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Thread: Age Limit

  1. #16
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    It's in a results page somewhere, but there was a man who won the silver medal in the Olympics as a forty-one year old.

    When eligibility was being changed (reinstatements allowed) the Protopopovs (this was actually written in Sandra Bezic's book) considered making a run for Swiss nationals (since they have since become Swiss citizens) and maybe making the Olympics. They would've made it in their...late fifties/early sixties!

  2. #17
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    Oldest competitor

    well, she's not a figure skater, but Mrs. Lorna Johnstone rode dressage in the Munich Olympics at aged 70.
    Linny

  3. #18
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    With the age limit for Worlds and Oly maybe ther shoudl be a age limit to enter National on the Senior level. Just a thought then there would be question wether or not a skater can compete at Worlds or Oly.

  4. #19
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    Who should impose age limits at the national level? All countries? Any country that feels like it? Just the USA?

    A lot of smaller countries have few enough skaters that they're happy to have anyone who can land a triple jump compete in their senior championships.

    In the US is so happens that the competition especially in the ladies division is so stiff that anyone who feels ready to compete at the senior level at age 12 or 13 or 14 or 15 is probably pretty darn good. Often they have already medaled, sometimes gold (Sarah Hughes) at the junior level and it would be boring for them to compete another year in juniors domestically. Or they prefer the looser requirements of the senior vs. the junior short program. Or they have some other reason for wanting to finish their tests as soon as possible and may or may not also have good competitive results.

    I've seen some very young skaters locally compete at a level where they're really not competitive and wonder why they don't stay back with their age group where they would place much better. Obviously international age restrictions are not an issue for these skaters. But they may have other reasons for wanting to test up quickly. They might have reason to expect that their bodies, their finances, their location if a parental job change is anticipated, etc., might not allow them to train and perform well enough even to pass the tests at a later age. They might realize that competitive success is not going to be the area where they can excel, but passing tests in general, or becoming the youngest senior in their area, will give them something to be proud of. They might be deluded about their actual potential. They might just want to play with the big kids. They might be planning to compete in and someday for a parent's homeland and need to finish the US tests so they can transfer that credential to a different country and not have to start at the bottom of that country's test structure. We might approve of some of these reasons, disapprove of some, and be indifferent to still others. Ultimately it's the skater's (and parents' and coach's) decision, which they'll have to live with.

    Historically the USFSA has left it up to each skater when to test up. Except that they have sometimes had rules that skaters MUST test up after winning nationals at a lower level.

    As long as everyone knows going into Nationals what international events they are or aren't eligible for by age, where's the problem?

  5. #20
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    The age rule is ridiculous. If a skater's abilities qualify them, their age shouldn't matter.

  6. #21
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    I'm not so sure the health hazzard is a good enough reason. Skaters who have the bug to skate are going to practice whatever it takes at whatever age to their own satisfaction.

    Joe

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz
    I'm not so sure the health hazzard is a good enough reason. Skaters who have the bug to skate are going to practice whatever it takes at whatever age to their own satisfaction.

    Joe

    Exactly- unless they make certain jumps illegal to skaters at a certain age, barring them from skating at Worlds/Olys isn't going to make a difference.

  8. #23
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    At the 1997 Nationals, the SENIOR ladies winner, Tara Lipinski, was 1 year and 5 months younger than the JUNIOR ladies winner, Andrea Gardiner. I wonder how many times overall this sort of thing has happened.....

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by antmanb
    I think that Butyrsakaya was 29 when she won worlds.

    In terms of oldest skaters i think it would probably be Tikhonov who is something like 33, Zhao Hongbo is also over 30, is he around 31 or 32.

    Ant
    Butyrskaya was 26 when she won worlds in 1999.

    The Protopopovs (Ludmilla Belousova & Oleg Protopopov) were 32 & 35 when they won their first OGM in 1964.

    Vash

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serena
    Exactly- unless they make certain jumps illegal to skaters at a certain age, barring them from skating at Worlds/Olys isn't going to make a difference.
    I don't see why some jumps should be made illegal for 'underage' skaters. That would mean the same as not allowing them to compete at a certain level. I think the age rule in FS is ridiculous. If a skater can compete at a certain level, he/she should be allowed to. Skaters can be and have been injured at any age, for different reasons. It should be left upto the skater how much risk he/she wants to take.

    Vash

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vash01
    I don't see why some jumps should be made illegal for 'underage' skaters. That would mean the same as not allowing them to compete at a certain level. I think the age rule in FS is ridiculous. If a skater can compete at a certain level, he/she should be allowed to. Skaters can be and have been injured at any age, for different reasons. It should be left upto the skater how much risk he/she wants to take.

    Vash
    I didn't mean that they should be illegal- but unless they do that, the age rule is pointless. Then again, the younger skaters could just as easily be doing those jumps in practice. Either way, I guess there's no way to prevent injury by age limits.

  12. #27
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    Maybe the ISU felt thay had to put in age limits if they wanted to go with CoP judging. 15-year-old prodigies like Mao Asada can rack up the points by doing triple Axels, triple-triple-doubles, etc. The older ladies don't have a chance, no matter how many PCSs they can coax out of the judges.

    At TEB Mao outumped the field by more than 10 points and won handily despite giving something back on the artistic marks. Maybe the ISU did not really intend for the NJS to work this way.

    MM

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman
    Maybe the ISU felt thay had to put in age limits if they wanted to go with CoP judging. 15-year-old prodigies like Mao Asada can rack up the points by doing triple Axels, triple-triple-doubles, etc. The older ladies don't have a chance, no matter how many PCSs they can coax out of the judges.

    At TEB Mao outumped the field by more than 10 points and won handily despite giving something back on the artistic marks. Maybe the ISU did not really intend for the NJS to work this way.

    MM
    Interesting point, MM. If they had truly implemented this rule in 1998, Michelle would have won the OGM; not Tara Lipinski who just outjumped her. I wonder if the JGP loop hole was closed right after the 1998 Olys?

    I do, however, see something similar happen with the 16 year olds too- for example, Kimmie Meissner outjumping an older skater and winning, although the GP results have not been good for her. We did see 16 year old Sarah Hughes win the 2002 OGM with two (supposedly) 3-3 combinations. So I am not sure the age limit serves this purpose.

    Vash

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