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Thread: For Anyone But Ptichka

  1. #1
    mathman444
    Guest

    For Anyone But Ptichka


    No Ptichkas allowed!!!!

    Well, OK, if no one gets this in three days, then Ptichka can come on and show us all how easy it is! :lol:

    Here's another quadrivia question:

    CAN YOU BEAT TIGER WOODS?

    A certain golf course has nine holes, of 300, 250, 200, 325, 275, 350, 225, 375 and 400 yards. You can use only two clubs, but each of these clubs has the magical property that it always goes perfectly straight with exactly the same distance every time (a different distance for each club), and so will either go straight toward the hole, pass over the hole, or drop into it.

    Tiger Woods chose distances of 125 and 75 yards, which allowed him to complete the course in 28 strokes.

    Find two distances that will beat Tiger.

  2. #2
    emiC
    Guest

    Re: For Anyone But Ptichka


    You expect us to solve this w/o a computer program?

    I don't have an answer.

    Here are some thoughts.

    There is an assumption that all 9 holes are lined up in a straight line?

    The following is not drawn to proportion

    l-----yd 0
    l
    l
    l-----yd 300
    l
    l
    l-----yd 550
    l
    l
    l-----yd 750
    l
    l
    l------yd 1075
    l
    l
    l-----yd 1350
    l
    l
    l
    l-----yd 1700
    l
    l
    l-----yd 1925
    l
    l
    l
    l-----yd 2300
    l
    l
    l
    l
    l-----yd 2700

    So we have to choose 2 clubs of different lengths, so in a series of strokes forward and backward the numbers 300, 550, 750, 1075, 1350, 1700, 1925, 2300, and 2700 will be hit. In order to beat Tiger the total # of strokes to advance and regress of the golf ball will have to be < 28 (probably 27)

    You are telling me this can be solved w/o a computer program?

    Anyways, if the prize is a dish of virtual dim sum, I want first pickings for understanding the question. :lol:

  3. #3
    cborsky
    Guest

    Re: For Anyone But Ptichka


    I think this is it!

    Choose distances of 100 and 125 yards

    300 yards: 100+100+100=3 shots
    250 yards: 125+125=2 shots
    200 yards: 100+100=2 shots
    325 yards: 125+100+100=3 shots
    275 yards: 125+125+125-100=4 shots
    350 yards: 125+125+100=3 shots
    225 yards: 125+100=2 shots
    375 yards: 125+125+125=2 shots
    EDIT: oops apparently I can figure out the problem, but unable to count strokes! 125+125+125 is 3 shots not 2!
    400 yards: 100+100+100+100=4 shots

    3+2+2+3+4+3+2+3+4=26 shots

    What's my prize mathman?

    ~Cassie


  4. #4
    mathman444
    Guest

    Re: For Anyone But Ptichka


    For emiC, here ya go:

    metro.thestar.com.my/rest...dimsum.jpg

    Cassie, that solution deserves the birthday club! So far, birthday CDs have been won by emiC for Jenny Kirk (August), SkatingCanuck for Jennifer Robinson (December) and Ptichka for Belbin and Agosto (July, for Tanith). What skater would you like to honor with a card and the gift of music?

    There aren't any rules for this contest, but if we go for one per month, September, October and November are open.

    Mathman

  5. #5
    cborsky
    Guest

    Re: For Anyone But Ptichka


    I'd like to give the gift to Jeffrey Buttle please.

    His Birthday is September 01, 1982

    Thank you soooo much!

    ~Cassie

    P.S. Do you need anymore information?

  6. #6
    mathman444
    Guest

    Re: Jeffrey Buttle


    Eventually I'll need his mailing address if you know it.

    Included in the card will be a recap of the questions that you answered for Jeffrey, including the geometry question on the other thread. I can only image Jeffrey's astonishment and admiration at all the effort you put into this contest!

    Eltamina -- No rush, but we need to start thinking of Jeff Buttle music for September first.

    Mathman

  7. #7
    eltamina
    Guest

    Poor Freddy he is the forgotten poet


    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>So far, birthday CDs have been won by emiC for Jenny Kirk (August), SkatingCanuck for Jennifer Robinson (December) and Ptichka for Belbin and Agosto (July, for Tanith). [/quote]

    So far emiC won 3 Hilary Hahn cds on various violin concertos - from MM, on the basis of some Egyptian thing for Kirk

    Ptichka won some cd(s) (to be announced, I am lobby for Louis Moreau GOTTSCHALK's A Night in the Tropics A Night in the Tropics, with the tarantella piece) from MM for solving some super duper math thing for Ben and /or Tanith

    Cassie won cd(s) to be announce from MM, on the basis of beating Tiger Woods for Buttle

    sk8tngcanuck won a 4cd box set of classical pieces from Elta for Jennifer Robinson for counting the rabbits and ducks

    Freddy the Pig2 won a 4 cd box set of classical pieces from Elta for Michelle Kwan for naming Pez as the name of the composer and candies.

    Honor mention for virtual candies and dim sum:

    Sk8cync named Vivaldi as the "Red Preist"

    4DK successfully named Penny Lane, and Rage over a lost penny as something that Beethoven, and the Beatles have in common.

    Freddy Pig 2 identified Goldberg and goldberg variaitons as the piece of music that cure count Kaiserling's insomnia.

    emiC started drawing a picture of the golf course.

    So stay tune folks, sometimes you may win cd(s) for your favorite skater(s), sometimes virtual candies and dim sum for yourself.

  8. #8
    mathman444
    Guest

    Re: Poor Freddy he is the forgotten poet


    Eltamina, about the Tarantella, I found another CD (Naxos) featuring the music of Castelnuovo-Tedescu perfromed by guitarist Lorenzo Micheli. It has "Tarantella," which the liner notes praise as C-T's best and best-known work for solo guitar. Also a lot of other cool stuff. I got one for myself and am listening to it now.

    www.musicweb.uk.net/class...lnuovo.htm

    What would you think of packaging this with the Gottschalk? I also found the Chopin tarantella on a Sony Essential Classics label for $7.99, with the Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-sharp Minor and 10 Polonaises, performer by Alexander Brailowsky. The reason that I mention the price is that at these prices we can send three CDs for the price of one full price CD, without sacrificing quality. Furthermore, as you know Naxos keeps bringing out wonderful stuff by lesser known performers and composers.

    Anyway, Tanith and Ben, being dancers, are sure to appreciate this Tarantella idea as something a little bit off the beaten path for most skaters. I have composed my letter to them, mentioning Ptichka's astonishing mental feats on their behalf and saying that now if the tarantella is ever chosen for the Original Dance they will be ahead of everybody else in the choice of music! :lol:

    Mathman

  9. #9
    mathman444
    Guest

    Re: Poor Freddy he is the forgotten poet


    PS. Dr. Watson deserves an honorable mention (with an assist from emiC) for solving Ptichka's conundrum about the ages of Sam's kids.

    But Freddy only won some Pez candy. Plus, I don't think that he really knew Goldberg.

    BTW, I see that no one has been able to answer Freddy's last trivia question: What Olympic gold medalist was represented by Michelle Kwan's agent, Shep Goldberg?

    MM

  10. #10
    eltamina
    Guest

    Re: Poor Freddy he is the forgotten poet


    From www.naxos.com

    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The Tarantella, Op. 87b,written for Segovia in the same year, became the composer's best-known guitar solo and a standard element in the guitarist's repertory. Castelnuovo-Tedesco was exploring Italian traditions in those years, and so it was only appropriate that he explore the possibilities of this most popular of national dances; he wrote several other tarantellas in his career, notably the Tarantella scura from Piedigrotta 1924, Op. 32.[/quote]

    Unfortunately, I can only listen to 1 minute of that piece, anyway your triple cds idea sounds good.

    MM
    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>But Freddy only won some Pez candy. Plus, I don't think that he really knew Goldberg.[/quote]

    Actually Freddy won a 4 cd set (same as Tara's Bday gift) for Michelle. He also won some virtual Hershey Kisses for the Goldberg thing. LOL that trivia about Goldberg variations and Bach is actually easy. If one does a Google search and put in the key words insomnia, and golden goblet the entire story will pop up.

    MM
    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>I see that no one has been able to answer Freddy's last trivia question: What Olympic gold medalist was represented by Michelle Kwan's agent, Shep Goldberg?[/quote]

    Well actually I kinda know the answer, of course after some hints from Freddy. Didn't the whole universe heard him sang

    Marylou, Marylou
    I luv U

    while he was splashing around in the McDonald farm?

    <span style="color:orange;font-size:small;">Folks, please answer this trivia for a virtual basket of FLORIDA SWEET oranges </span>

    <img src="http://www.macks-groves.com/Images/Products/FullSize/navels.jpg" style="border:0;"/>

    <strong>Name the mystery English composer</strong>

    <span style="color:orange;font-size:medium;">His father sent him to Florida to learn the art of cultivating FLORIDA SWEET.He spent all his time in Florida composing music instead. </span>

    <strong>Hint, in order to answer this question you have to take some poetry lessons from Freddy. Hmmmm, so what rhymes with FLORIDA SWEET?</strong>

  11. #11
    DrWatson
    Guest

    Re: Poor Freddy he is the forgotten poet


    My good Dr. E.:

    Ah, how well do I remember the despair of Mr. Julius Delius -- an upstanding merchant in the textile trade -- at the waywardness of young Frederick! Master Delius was such an unsatisfactory son, always so lost in slothful (as it seemed to those who could not share the visions of his genius) daydreams of molto crescendo and alegretto vivacci that his older disapproving relatives referred to him as Frederick the Pig.

    My colleague Mr. Sherlock Holmes, however, remains in Frederick's debt. Mr. Delius' experience as a Florida orchardsman, disastrous though it may have proved as a business venture, gave insight into the workings of a certain sinister American organization in the matter of The Five Orange Pips.

    If I may venture into your entertaining "quadrivia" game, I pose: What organiztion am I referring to, and what happened to Mr. Holmes' client, who appealed to Mr. Holmes for protection?

    John Watson, MD

    PS. I do enjoy a good pun! The Florida Suite, indeed!

  12. #12
    eltamina
    Guest

    Where is Mr. Holmes, we need a good detective


    J.W.

    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>his older disapproving relatives referred to him as Frederick the Pig.[/quote]

    :rollin: :rollin: :rollin:

    <span style="color:red;font-size:medium;">Notice, Stradivarius Violin was stolen in June 1996 </span>
    <span style="color:red;font-size:x-small;">from the Glinka museum of musical culture</span>

    Reward

    a virtual tiara, previously owned by Queen Elisabeth of ------

    royal-jewels3.tripod.com/...tier-2.jpg

    Hint
    Queen Elisabeth of ------- was the first royalty to be received at the Kremlin.
    She was a patron of the art, and an accomplished violinist.

    She gave her Strad to a king. Who was he? What is the name of the violin?

    After his death, his family bequeathed the Strad to the Glinka museum.


  13. #13
    4dogknight
    Guest

    Re: Where is Mr. Holmes, we need a good detective


    Dr. Watson you posed the following question:
    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>My colleague Mr. Sherlock Holmes, however, remains in Frederick's debt. Mr. Delius' experience as a Florida orchardsman, disastrous though it may have proved as a business venture, gave insight into the workings of a certain sinister American organization in the matter of The Five Orange Pips.

    If I may venture into your entertaining "quadrivia" game, I pose: What organization am I referring to, and what happened to Mr. Holmes' client, who appealed to Mr. Holmes for protection?[/quote]

    The sinister American organization is the KKK (Klu Klux Klan) and John Openshaw was murdered by agents of the KKK because John Openshaw’s grandfather, father and John himself did not follow directions sent to them from the KKK agents.

    John Openshaw was referred to Mr. Holmes, after contacting the police who did not take his story seriously, by Major Prendergast who was a client of Holmes in a previous case.
    After Holmes heard Openshaw’s story he made several deductions:
    1. That Openshaw’s life was very real and imminent danger.
    2. That Openshaw must follow the directions in the letter;
    “You must put this piece of paper which you have shown us into the brass box which you have described. You must also put in a note to say that all the other papers were burned by your uncle, and that this is the only one which remains. You must assert that in such words as will carry conviction with them. Having done this, you must at once put the box out upon the sundial, as directed”
    3. That because it was not yet nine, the streets would be crowded and he might be in safety. Openshaw told Holmes that he carried a weapon.
    4. Holmes told Openshaw, "Do not think of revenge, or anything of the sort, at present. I think that we may gain that by means of the law; but we have our web to weave, while theirs is already woven. The first consideration is to remove the pressing danger which threatens you. The second is to clear up the mystery and to punish the guilty parties." Holmes also told Openshaw that he would contact him in two days.


    The meeting was never to be because according to the morning’s newspaper Openshaw’s body was found in the Thames near Waterloo Bridge and the police determined he was the victim of an unfortunate accident. (Unfortunate accidents were also determined to be the cause of his grandfather’s and father’s death.)

    Holmes deduced that Openshaw’s grandfather, after serving in the southern military and had taken a strong part in opposing the carpet-bag politicians who had been sent down from the North, had some very strong reason for leaving America. Men at his time of life do not change all their habits and exchange willingly the charming climate of Florida for the lonely life of an English provincial town. His extreme love of solitude in England suggests the idea that he was in fear of someone or something, so we may assume as a working hypothesis that it was fear of someone or something which drove him from America. As to what it was he feared, we can only deduce that by considering the formidable letters which were received by himself and his successors.

    Holmes also deduced from the dates on the letters to the three Openshaws that the letters were sent by the man or men on a sailing-ship and that they always sent their singular warning or tokens before them when starting upon their mission.

    Holmes spent an entire day over Lloyd's registers and files of the old papers following the future career of every vessel which touched at the ports from which the letters containing the orange pips were sent. He deduced that it must be an American and that the vessel Lone Star, instantly attracted his attention, since the name is that which is given to one of the states of the Union.

    The ship had cleared London en route to Savannah and Holmes thinking to extract some retribution for the Openshaws, cabled the police of Savannah that the three American crew members were want in England upon a charge of murder.

    From Dr. Watson’s journal:
    “There is ever a flaw, however, in the best laid of human plans, and the murderers of John Openshaw were never to receive the orange pips which would show them that another, as cunning and as resolute as themselves, was upon their track. Very long and very severe were the equinoctial gales that year. We waited long for news of the Lone Star of Savannah, but none ever reached us. We did at last hear that somewhere far out in the Atlantic a shattered stern-post of the boat was seen swinging in the trough of a wave, with the letters "L. S." carved upon it, and that is all which we shall ever know of the fate of the Lone Star.”

    There is the answer to your questions. if anyone wants to read the short story, here's a link to a great site. Just scroll down to "The Five Orange Pips".
    221bakerstreet.org/

    4dk, who is now in the midst of re-reading some of these wonderful stories. Thank you Dr. Watson for the interesting question.




  14. #14
    4dogknight
    Guest

    Re: Where is Mr. Holmes, we need a good detective


    Wow eltamina what an interesting puzzle but I could only figure out some of it. I can't connect the king to the violinist:

    <span style="font-size:small;"><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr><em>Notice, Stradivarius Violin was stolen in June 1996
    from the Glinka museum of musical culture
    Reward
    a virtual tiara, previously owned by Queen Elisabeth of -------
    royal-jewels3.tripod.com/...tier-2.jpg
    Hint
    Queen Elisabeth of ------- was the first royalty to be received at the Kremlin.

    She was a patron of the art, and an accomplished violinist.
    She gave her Strad to a king. Who was he? What is the name of the violin?
    After his death, his family bequeathed the Strad to the Glinka museum.</em>[/quote]</span>

    Queen Elisabeth of the Belgians in 1958 was the first royalty to be received at the Kremlin.

    I assume Queen Elisabeth would have given the violin to her grandson, King Boudouin. That would take care of the king question.

    The name of the Strad was the Oistrakh - named after David Oistrakh the winner of the first Ysaÿe Competition (1937).

    Now it's here that I can't get the direct link of Glinka Museum and your question of who bequeathed the Strad.
    What I found was the following:

    The Oistrakh, a present of the Queen Elizabeth of Belgium, was stolen from the Glinka Museum for Music and Culture in June, 1996.
    and
    The exhibits representing the general European professional tradition include a violin made by the great Antonio Stradivari (17th century), which was donated to the museum by David Oistrakh's family.

    So eltamina, where am I running amok? Have I taken the path less traveled? Am I barking up the wrong tree?

    Please advise because this is going to drive me nuts.

    4dk






  15. #15
    eltamina
    Guest

    Bravo 4DK


    You solved the Oistrakh (the violin) mystery. By the king I meant the king of the violin of course. David Oistrakh had been called the king of the violin.

    Even though I list a virtual tiara as the prize, unfortunately the link did not work, and you have answered more quadrivia questions than most.

    So I will send a cd to your favorite skater. Please let me know who is the skater and his/her Bday, and mailing address.

    BTW, stay tune, next week I will post a musical quadrivia for real (cd) prize.

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