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Thread: Death Threats for Johnny

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by elingrace4eva
    First of all, skating is not Johnny's job. Johnny is an amateur, skating is his chosen activity....

    And I would hardly call working extremely hard to become an elite at your sport is doing the "bare minimum" of it.
    Skating is not only Johnny's chosen activity, it is how he supports himself. My point was very simple, though -- yes Johnny works extremely hard to become an elite in his sport, but the same can be said for every other elite skater. That is why I called it the "bare minimum" of elite skating -- every elite skater has to do it. It is the "extra" -- understanding that they are role models and acting accordingly, or just making people happy -- that sets some elite skaters apart from others in popular opinion, at least.

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by attyfan
    Skating is not only Johnny's chosen activity, it is how he supports himself. My point was very simple, though -- yes Johnny works extremely hard to become an elite in his sport, but the same can be said for every other elite skater. That is why I called it the "bare minimum" of elite skating -- every elite skater has to do it. It is the "extra" -- understanding that they are role models and acting accordingly, or just making people happy -- that sets some elite skaters apart from others in popular opinion, at least.

    Skaters should not be expected to be role models. If people feel that the lives of these athletes should be emulated, than by all means they should do so. But skaters are not "understood" to be role models by definition. To expect Johnny to act differently than he naturally would simply to fit into some tiny, defined "role model" box is unfair. He's an athlete. He is not out there trying to save the world, and he is not, by definition, a role model. He is a skater. To excel at his activity is to skate well and win world medals. Nothing more should be expected of him.

    If people want role models, they have to find them for themselves. People shouldn't have to change their behavior simply because they are in the public eye just so people will see them as such. Johnny Weir is an amazing skater. He shouldn't have to change himself.

  3. #123
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    But the other side of the coin is -- we are the ones who are paying for the athletes to strut their stuff.

    I sent a small check to the USOC. They used it to send Bode Miller to Torino. Bode partied day and night and when he fell all over the ski slopes the next day, he quipped that at least he won a gold medal in partying.

    OK. But do it on your own dime.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by elingrace4eva
    Skaters should not be expected to be role models. If people feel that the lives of these athletes should be emulated, than by all means they should do so. But skaters are not "understood" to be role models by definition. To expect Johnny to act differently than he naturally would simply to fit into some tiny, defined "role model" box is unfair. He's an athlete. He is not out there trying to save the world, and he is not, by definition, a role model. He is a skater. To excel at his activity is to skate well and win world medals. Nothing more should be expected of him.

    If people want role models, they have to find them for themselves. People shouldn't have to change their behavior simply because they are in the public eye just so people will see them as such. Johnny Weir is an amazing skater. He shouldn't have to change himself.
    First, insofar as exceling at his activity is "to skate well and win world medals", Johnny isn't even doing that much.

    Second, no one said said he should change. It's just that people (especially kids) do see athletes as role models -- whether they should or shouldn't do this doesn't alter what they in fact do. It also doesn't alter the fact that people like athletes who understand that behavior, and behave accordingly. Therefore, when an athlete "gives a little extra" (i.e., in addition to excelling in their sport, serving as role model), they tend to "get a little extra" (i.e., popularity, support) then those who don't. If Johnny doesn't want to serve as role model, he doesn't have to -- but neither he nor his fans should complain about his getting less respect/support than the Michelles, Sashas and Kimmies who manage to do both.

  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by attyfan
    First, insofar as exceling at his activity is "to skate well and win world medals", Johnny isn't even doing that much.

    Second, no one said said he should change. It's just that people (especially kids) do see athletes as role models -- whether they should or shouldn't do this doesn't alter what they in fact do. It also doesn't alter the fact that people like athletes who understand that behavior, and behave accordingly. Therefore, when an athlete "gives a little extra" (i.e., in addition to excelling in their sport, serving as role model), they tend to "get a little extra" (i.e., popularity, support) then those who don't. If Johnny doesn't want to serve as role model, he doesn't have to -- but neither he nor his fans should complain about his getting less respect/support than the Michelles, Sashas and Kimmies who manage to do both.
    I totally agree with you on the first part. But people aren't complaining about him not winning, they're complaining about his behavior.

    I haven't heard anyone complain about Johnny "getting less respect". In fact, I've heard the opposite. The only complaints I've heard are from people saying that Johnny should act a certain way, or "give a little extra". If Johnny is willing to give up public support in order to act the way he does, why does it matter? If you don't like him, don't support him. That probably isn't going to change the way he skates.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by elingrace4eva
    If Johnny is willing to give up public support in order to act the way he does, why does it matter? If you don't like him, don't support him. That probably isn't going to change the way he skates.
    That's exactly how I feel.

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by elingrace4eva
    I totally agree with you on the first part. But people aren't complaining about him not winning, they're complaining about his behavior.

    I haven't heard anyone complain about Johnny "getting less respect". In fact, I've heard the opposite. The only complaints I've heard are from people saying that Johnny should act a certain way, or "give a little extra". If Johnny is willing to give up public support in order to act the way he does, why does it matter? If you don't like him, don't support him. That probably isn't going to change the way he skates.
    We must have been reading different threads, since I've heard a lot of people on a lot of boards (including, but not limited to this one) complain how they think the USFS is "promoting" Evan at Johnny's expense, or otherwise "dissing" Johnny (such as the alleged absence of his picture on the website for the 2007 Nats) -- and my theory about some skaters "giving a little extra" is addressed to those people.

    I agree wholeheartedly that Johnny has the right to do his own thing, and I also agree that certain consequences (such as hate mail) should not be tolerated.

  8. #128
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    What exactly does it mean when it is assumed a Federation (or Association) is promoting one of its own skaters over another of its own skaters?

    In the case of Weir, what would be the advantage to promoting Lysacek more than him?

    Joe

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz
    What exactly does it mean when it is assumed a Federation (or Association) is promoting one of its own skaters over another of its own skaters?

    In the case of Weir, what would be the advantage to promoting Lysacek more than him?

    Joe
    Yeah, I really don't get this either. Assuming the judging is fair (which is a huge assumption), federation favoritism really shouldn't matter, should it?

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