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Thread: The US system... Help?

  1. #1
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    Question The US system... Help?

    Hey guys, I would like to know about how the US system works. Tests, levels, different classes, basically EVERYTHING. I am probably not making any sense, so I'll try with an example.
    If I came and moved to the US and wanted to compete, what would I need to do? Like tests and what different kinds. I'm only interested in Singles

    If you still aren't clear on what I'm looking for, I'll describe our system so you'll get an idea on what I'm looking for.
    Here in Sweden we first devide by age. Easily described the classes are;
    0-10 Minior
    10-15 Ungdom
    15-19 Junior
    19 and up Senior
    (There is also a beginners class but that doesn't really count. No age limit, no skills required)
    Then we go by skill which is determined by two sorts of tests, the Basic and the Free.
    The Basic is steps, moves on the ice and parts from the old school figures. Just general stroking is included too. There are 6 different Basic tests
    The Free is jumps and spins. 6 levels there too.
    In the age groups there are 3 different classes. A B and C. The A's are the best ones, then comes the B's, well you get the drill. To be in the different classes you need different tests. Like to be in Ungdom A, you need Free3 and Basic3. But to be a Junior A, you need F4 B4.
    I am currently in SeniorB but is working my *** of in hope to become a SeniorA before November (Sectionals [A's don't have to qualify from Regionals]).

    So please, anyone, explain the system to me. If you have some great website somewhere where it's easily explained, I'll be happy for that too. But I'm not that super great with the real posh formulations they tend to put in the "official" documents on like ISU.
    So... any takers?

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    Gliding Along dlkksk8fan's Avatar
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    Hello c_e_ahlen! What level are you at? Have you taken any tests or done any competitions in Sweden? How old are you.

    Check out the USFSA web site.

    If you come here you would probably have to begin at the beginning tests, that are through the USFSA. Once you pass certain tests you qualify to compete at that level. Here are the levels:

    Senior singles -- Senior moves test and senior free skate test

    Junior singles -- Junior moves test or higher and the junior free skate test but no higher

    Novice singles-- Novice moves test or higher and the novice free skate test but no higher

    Intermediate singles--Intermediate moves test or higher and the intermediate free skate test but no higher

    Juvenile singles---Juvenile moves test or higher and juvenile free skate test but no higher

    Juvenile would be the first test to take.

    I am a adult skater who has passed the pre bonze tests. That means I can compete at that level. I will be taken my bronze tests which if I pass will allow me to compete at the bronze level in adults.

    Hope this helps

  3. #3
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Actually, prepreliminary, preliminary, and prejuvenile come before juvenile (which is the first qualifying level for 12 and under). Each test must be taken in order with the MIF test coming first.

  4. #4
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    My two cents:

    Age categories are much more open in the US. Only Juvenile qualifying meets (like regionals and sectionals) have an upper age limit of 12. If there is a non-qualifying meet with an age limit for Juvenile, they will typically have an Open Juvenile event.

    Question for those more in the know: Does intermediate have an 18-year-old age limit?

    For sure, the US novice level and above does not have any age restrictions.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_e_ahlen View Post
    Hey guys, I would like to know about how the US system works. Tests, levels, different classes, basically EVERYTHING. I am probably not making any sense, so I'll try with an example.
    If I came and moved to the US and wanted to compete, what would I need to do? Like tests and what different kinds. I'm only interested in Singles
    ...
    I am currently in SeniorB but is working my *** of in hope to become a SeniorA before November (Sectionals [A's don't have to qualify from Regionals]).

    So please, anyone, explain the system to me. If you have some great website somewhere where it's easily explained, I'll be happy for that too.
    I recommend that you look over Don Korte's useful site -- his "Rules and Regulations" section includes By-Level Element Summaries for USFS test vs. competition: http://www.sk8stuff.com/m_rules.htm

    As a senior skater in Sweden, you should be allowed to compete as a senior representing your federation in U.S. non-qualifying (club) competitions. Skaters from Canada, Russia, Mexico, etc. competed at the major Liberty club competition this past July, for example. Or are you thinking about possibly entering U.S. national qualifying competitions? (Novice, Junior and Senior level skaters compete at Regionals in October as the first qualifying competition on the road to U.S. Nationals).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alsace View Post
    Question for those more in the know: Does intermediate have an 18-year-old age limit?
    17 is the maximum age for Intermediate singles skaters (turning 18 after the Sept. 1st Regionals application deadline is okay) -- see Regionals "Age Limited Events" at: http://www.sk8stuff.com/f_rules/regi...nformation.htm

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    dlkksk8fan- Yes, I have taken 8 tests, 4 in basic and 4 in Free, so I have test 3-3 (the first one in each isn't numbered, it's a "basic skill" test). I'm 19½ and have 48 competitions behind me.

    Sylvia- No, I am not allowed to compete FOR Sweden. I'd have to send in papers to the Swedish federation, and they wouldn't allow it, since according to them, I'm not good enough. But if I went on my own, I guess I could compete. But then only as a representative for the club KKlutz, which just happens to be in Sweden.
    Thanks for the link, it looks like a good one. I'll check it out!

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    Gliding Along dlkksk8fan's Avatar
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    Actually, prepreliminary, preliminary, and prejuvenile
    opps forgot to put these. Thanks msskater93

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    I should have written: "As a senior skater in Sweden, you should be allowed to compete as a senior representing your Swedish CLUB in U.S. non-qualifying (club) competitions." It's definitely worth checking out further to see if you can do this.

    Feel free to post any other questions you may have in this thread.

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    Okey, I just read the rules and is wondering why I don't live in the US! Your tests seem to be so much better then ours. You actually get to skate a program? We don't... By looking at your system, I would either be a Junior or a Senior. However if I had had bad timing, I'd still be in Intermediate thanks to my toeloop... It just refuses to work. All the other doubles are solid. Except the Axel.
    Don't understand half of what's in the Moves in the Field-tests though. I think the elements are named differently in Swedish...

    Oh and btw, what the heck is a "double toe Walley" and "Waltz jump"? And looking at the Juvenile Freestyle Test, I get the split jump, but stag, falling leaf, half loop? Why do half a jump? I saw it in the PrePreliminary Freestyle Test
    as well, but there as half Flip and half Lutz. We don't do half jumps. It just confuses me.

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    You should also know that what is required for testing at a certain level, and what you see in competition at that level are two very different things.

    For example, (I'm assuming you're female), to be competitive at junior in most larger competitions you'd need a double axel and at least a few triples (probably at least one in combination), along w/ the usual spins, speed, footwork, etc. Someone else who follows the singles comps could confirm that or correct it if I'm wrong. I believe they start throwing in triple attempts at Intermediate.

    The competitors are held back from testing long past the point that they could go out and pass the test.

  12. #12
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    The Junior Ladies who will make it out of Sectionals will usually be those with 4-5 different triples. Novice is a double Axel and a couple triples (2-3 usually), Intermediate to make it out of IR at Junior Nationals is double Axel and 1-2 triples, Juvenile is usually double Axel for IRs at Junior Nationals.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_e_ahlen View Post
    Oh and btw, what the heck is a "double toe Walley" and "Waltz jump"? And looking at the Juvenile Freestyle Test, I get the split jump, but stag, falling leaf, half loop? Why do half a jump? I saw it in the PrePreliminary Freestyle Test
    as well, but there as half Flip and half Lutz. We don't do half jumps. It just confuses me.
    A toe walley is like a toe loop from an inside edge. Judges count them as the same thing.

    Waltz jump takes off and lands like an axel, but has only a half a rotation. I think they're also called Three jumps. It's one of the first jumps most kids learn. A really pretty one almost looks like a split position.

    Stag is like a split jump, but with the front leg bent.

    Falling leafs are hard to describe... Sarah Hughes does one 5 minutes into this recording. You can do it in a split position, or in a stag position, or with both legs bent and turned out so that from above they look like (I hate to have to describe such a pretty move this way) a half of a swastika.

    Half loop is like a regular loop that lands on the other foot. It's good for sequences into salchows or flips. Sarah Hughes does one with artistic arms and legs in that program right after the falling leaf.

    Do you know bunny hops in Sweden? You take off on one foot going forwards, then land on the toe of the other foot and step down onto the foot you took off from. Half flips and lutzes take off like the full versions, but the landing is like a bunny hop. It helps beginning skaters learn the take-offs early.

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