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Thread: What Makes a Relative New Skater Special?

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    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    What Makes a Relative New Skater Special?

    This is just my way at predicting a skater who will be special in the years to come.

    The young skater whether in juvenile, junior, novice or even seniors whom I've never seen before has the following traits for my own prediction)

    1. A sincere demeanor while stepping onto the ice before the judges and audience.

    2. Begin to skate to, and continue to skate to, the music with any variations the music has to offer.

    3. The all important flow over the ice should be seen almost immediately. Clean cut edging should flow from one element to another with excellent jump landings, and spin finishings.

    The above, in my opinion, is with the individual skater. Teaching or Coaching of the above is fruitless unless the skater has the natural feeling for figure skating.

    A good choreographer can work wonders with a skater who has the above traits and a style will be formed.

    Quads and Bielmans are fine but are they really figure skating?

    Joesitz

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz View Post
    This is just my way at predicting a skater who will be special in the years to come.

    The young skater whether in juvenile, junior, novice or even seniors whom I've never seen before has the following traits for my own prediction)

    1. A sincere demeanor while stepping onto the ice before the judges and audience.

    2. Begin to skate to, and continue to skate to, the music with any variations the music has to offer.

    3. The all important flow over the ice should be seen almost immediately. Clean cut edging should flow from one element to another with excellent jump landings, and spin finishings.

    The above, in my opinion, is with the individual skater. Teaching or Coaching of the above is fruitless unless the skater has the natural feeling for figure skating.

    A good choreographer can work wonders with a skater who has the above traits and a style will be formed.

    Quads and Bielmans are fine but are they really figure skating?

    Joesitz
    Well, I think it is focus, focus, focus. If they need to make straight As, if they want to chase boys, or girls, if they play other sports, or maybe if they are worried about money or their parents' staying together, they can't focus on any of the above, and that's a tall order. I am not a parent so I far from know what I'm talking about, but it has to count for something.

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    ~ Figure Skating Is My Passion ~ Ladskater's Avatar
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    I saw Karen Magnussen interviewed and she said she started figure skating at the age of six. Her mom took her to the rink for a mom's and kid's session. Karen skated around the rink a few times with the help of the metal apparatus (looks kind of like a chair) and the next thing her mom saw was Karen skating unassisted and the metal apparatus on the other side of the rink. Her mom knew then that Karen was destined to be a great skater.

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    MY TVC 1 5 SeaniBu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladskater View Post
    I saw Karen Magnussen interviewed and she said she started figure skating at the age of six. Her mom took her to the rink for a mom's and kid's session. Karen skated around the rink a few times with the help of the metal apparatus (looks kind of like a chair) and the next thing her mom saw was Karen skating unassisted and the metal apparatus on the other side of the rink. Her mom knew then that Karen was destined to be a great skater.
    What a inspirational story!

    I have always thought that there are so many different types of people and skaters on the simplest level a refection of types of people. It takes so many types to fill this world, so skaters can come in may different types of people. There are definitive types of skaters with their own types of personalities, but one thing holds true of all - perseverance and demur tenacity. These beautiful people that give their all to give us the truest meaning of expression through perseverance.

    Whatever you skate (on what level) thank you for giving a great amount of life to a sport that embodies all that is competition AND entertainment!

    Tomorrow at 11:00 is a great time for me, the rest of the world will see!

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    Matt Savoie~Soul Skater CzarinaAnya's Avatar
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    Emotional stability/Sportmanship is a also a key factor in how well a skater will connect with his/her audience. The ones who just kept reaching for the gold and never quite got it, or even the ones who do leave the sport early, and do it gracefully, are both usually remembered fondly by the avid skating fan. We can all attest to who we remember not so fondly, because they weren't able to control themeselves.

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    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Remember I'm not talking about What Makes a Champion - big jumps and convoluted spins will do that (with a clean routine, of course)

    I'm talking about those 10, 15, 16 year olds who can wow you with beautiful basics, and you know that there is a special skater trying to come out.

    It was Caroline Zhang last year and this year it seems to be Adam Rippon, but I will hold off on the latter to see him again.

    There are,imo, many other talented skaters coming up to standard but few have that neat technique to make them special.

    My special skaters of the past: Johnny Weir, Sasha Cohen, Yukina Ota. They don't necessarily win competitions but they are still special.

    Joe

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    ~ Figure Skating Is My Passion ~ Ladskater's Avatar
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    I think what really makes a new skater special or capture one's attention is the skaters' love of figure skating. The Toller Cranstons, and Kurt Brownings are inspiring to watch. They are a gift to the ice. Watching Toller skate was like watching an artist paint a picture from the beginning to the end - of course Toller is an artist as well. The same goes for Kurt. He is inspiring and a joy to watch.

    I know what you are getting at here. What makes a particular skater stand out from the rest when they burst on the competetive scene.

    I noticed Shawn Sawyer's gifts right away as soon as I saw him skate. Toller Cranston more or less "discovered" Shawn and featured him in one of his last specials. Toller recognized Shawn Sawyers special talents right away. Shawn's line and flexibility are awesome.

    All skaters work hard, but some just have that extra something that makes them special and it is always inspiring to watch them when they come along.

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    IMHO, good answer.

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    Sexy, smart and sterilized! childfreegirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz View Post
    Quads and Bielmans are fine but are they really figure skating?
    They are part of skating, but IMO, they should not be the focus. So somebody has a quad - fine. But do they also have a sense of style? Do they interpet the music, skating fast when it's called for and slowly when that's called for? Do they really get into the program, or are they just skating from jump to jump or element to element like a robot? That feel for the music, the interpetation, is what I look for and what I enjoy in skating. Quads and bielmans in a program are fine, but they don't make or break the program for me.

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    When I watch "new" skaters, I look for spark and personality. I don't want to see someone who looks terrified or something like that. Second, consistancy, and third, a willingness to take risks.

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    What's sad to me is, the many beautiful skaters that will never reach the limelight.......mainly because they don't ever get the triple jumps.

    There's a girl at my rink, novice level, who just skates with pure joy and abandon. On a good day, she makes me cry to watch her run through her program. But you'll never see her in the higher ranks because she's a nervous competitor and the jumps just aren't there.

    I wish there were more show or ice theater performance opportunities for skaters like this, who truly do shine on the ice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by backspin View Post
    What's sad to me is, the many beautiful skaters that will never reach the limelight.......mainly because they don't ever get the triple jumps.

    There's a girl at my rink, novice level, who just skates with pure joy and abandon. On a good day, she makes me cry to watch her run through her program. But you'll never see her in the higher ranks because she's a nervous competitor and the jumps just aren't there.
    We have a girl at our rink who found herself in a similar situation. She tested out and is now co-coaching a young girl who seems to have great talent. I can already see the influence of this beautiful skater taking hold in the little spitfire. May make for a wonderful combination.

    Let's hope the beautiful skaters can find a way to impart their skating talents. There seem to be plenty of coaches to work on the jumps.

    JW

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz View Post
    Remember I'm not talking about What Makes a Champion - big jumps and convoluted spins will do that (with a clean routine, of course)
    Joe
    This an over simplistic and disregarding definition of a "what makes a champion".
    Being a champion is not about being the best jumper or spinner, having the best choreography or being the most talented. It’s about mastering your fears, controlling your nerves, withstanding the pressure even if you feel it crushes you. This is the hardest part in any sport and separates the champions from the rest of the pack.
    And the Olympic champions are even more special since the chances to win the gold are so very few. Imagine you failed once. Imagine how sublime is to be able to win on your last try.

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    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amber68 View Post
    This an over simplistic and disregarding definition of a "what makes a champion".
    Amber - I seldom use emoticons. If I did for my simplistic definition of a champion I would have used

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    what didn't kill me-made me stronger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz View Post

    Quads and Bielmans are fine but are they really figure skating?

    joe, I SO agree with you!
    That's exactly what I meant in my post in that thread about Asada's and Kimmie's quads. I hope ladies skating will not become just a fight for better jumpin mashine.
    And bielmans...I SO didn't like on one of the competitions where I was last year, almost EVERY girl did a bileman. Maybe each...20th didn't. So, atleast for me, bielman isn't what it used to be.

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