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Thread: Can someone please explain edging to me?

  1. #1
    Custom Title Johar's Avatar
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    Can someone please explain edging to me?

    What exactly is it? Are there pics that demonstrate good edging from bad?

  2. #2
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    skaters get more power if they're on the edge of the blade as opposed to the flat....

    after that I can't explain it, but that was the definition that I remember from Kristi's book for dummies lol

  3. #3
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Go forward on the right skate and make a circle. That's a forward outside edge. Now without changing your position go forward on the left skate and make a circle. That's a forward inside edge.

    Back edges are the same except one skates backwards on outside and inside to fom the circles.

    A serpentine is going forward for a half circle and change to another circle. that's a change of edge from outside to inside. One can also do a change of edge starting out on an inside edge for half a circle and change to outside.

    Similarly, back edges are the same except one skates backwards to make the serpentinesl.

    One needs good leaning body positions and especially the pressure one has to put on the skating foot.

    Adding 3 turn, brackets, rockers and counters form the basics.

    I don't know about twizzles. they weren't around in my hayday.

    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johar View Post
    What exactly is it?
    What context are you referring to?

    "Edging" isn't really an official term, but it can be used colloquially to refer to edge quality* or just using the edges of the blade at all as opposed to skating in straight lines, and including more complicated moves using the blade edges, such as turns and changes of edge.

    But first, do you need an explanation of what the edges are? Does Joesitz's post make sense to you or would an even more basic breakdown be useful?

    Are there pics that demonstrate good edging from bad?
    We could find pictures that demonstrate deep edges (skaters leaning over their blades at a more acute angle) vs. shallow (more upright blades), but you really can't tell the quality of the movement across the ice from still pictures.

    *When I think of edge quality, I think of it including things like
    -how deeply the skater is leaning over the edge of the blade
    -how curved the path s/he's traveling is
    -how controlled and smooth the curves are
    -how much power the skater gets from each push
    -what part of the blade the skater is pushing from and what part s/he's gliding on
    -how quiet the blades are on the ice and what kinds of sounds they make when they do make sound
    -how fluid or flowing the skater's movement across the ice is
    -how effortlessly they appear to glide

    Often if people say a skater has "good edging" they mean that the skater does all those things well.

  5. #5
    Gliding Along dlkksk8fan's Avatar
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    The blade on each skate has two edges, with a hallow in between them. Each edge is sharp allowing the skater to grip the ice securely when the body is aligned right. In the olden days of school figures, only one edge of the blades were allowed to touch the ice. If you skated "flat" that meant you were skating on both edges, not good.

    Footwork, spirals and jumps all call for use of a single edge. Brain Boitano has beautiful edges, especially his spread eagles. Michelle Kwan's spirals were always on a beautiful edge inside and out.

    The skate edge on the outer side is called an outside edge and the edge between the feet is called and inside edge.

  6. #6
    MY TVC 1 5 SeaniBu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlkksk8fan View Post
    The blade on each skate has two edges, with a hallow in between them.
    I don't know how many would agree with this, but I see a blade as having 4 - front and rear are also included and I don't see them as being the same because you can't skate on the front and the back of the blade simultaneously. Granted it is one edge per side but...?
    Last edited by SeaniBu; 01-30-2007 at 09:51 PM.

  7. #7
    In my heart, I'm actually Canadian....
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    If you look at "action photos" of skaters from the 50s and 60s, you'll often notice that they have rather an extreme "lean" going on and yet remain in motion, as opposed to falling on their side. This is an example. The best example of this kind of thing I can come up with is the "hydroblading" that Shae-Lynn & Vic used to do.

    The best example of "bad edging", if any edging was going on at all, would be to look at Surya Bonaly's programs from the late 80s/early 90s (if not her entire career). Notice how she seems to be rather "lumbering about" out there; that's because she's not skating on an edge, she's skating on the "flat" with both edges on the ice at once. Definite no-no, tho, hey, she got 5 Euro titles despite it, so who am I to judge???:sheesh: :sheesh:

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    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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  9. #9
    Ballroom Baby
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    Mechanically, a skate blade has two edges, left and right. In kinetic terms, there are forward inside, forward outside, back inside, back outside. (If you want, break that down further into right and left for each.) You push more effectively from an edge, you turn on edges, basically everything in figure skating is properly done on an edge, not on the flat.

  10. #10
    Gliding Along dlkksk8fan's Avatar
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    I don't know how many would agree with this, but I see a blade as having 4 - front and rear are also included and I don't see them as being the same because you can't skate on the front and the back of the blade simultaneously. Granted it is one edge per side but...?
    Seanibu- that's an interesting concept, the blade having four edges. But I can assure you that the blade has only two edges. You don't want to skate on the rear of the blade because what happens is that you fall. Leaning too far back is not a good idea. Besides having two edges a figure blade is curved from the front to the back. This is called the radius or rocker.

    Power and glide across the ice fundamentally derives from efficient use of the edges to generate speed.

  11. #11
    Gliding Along dlkksk8fan's Avatar
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    Mathmann if you look at the line on the ice from Michelle's blade you can see it is only one line and not two. She is on the right outside edge.

  12. #12
    MY TVC 1 5 SeaniBu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlkksk8fan View Post
    Besides having two edges a figure blade is curved from the front to the back. This is called the radius or rocker.
    .
    That is precisely what I am saying. The front and rear of the curve. I understood in "reality and all" just the way I think of it. JVC explained it well.

  13. #13
    Rooting for the divas with Kwanford Spun Silver's Avatar
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    This is a wonderfully informative thread. I am usually too embarrassed to ask such basic questions, so thanks to Johar as well as those who wrote such good replies. They are so informative and complementary - an example of Goldenskate teamwork.

  14. #14
    Down With It
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    I agree, very informative. Thanks.

  15. #15
    Medalist
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    Thanks guys, very informative. Everytime someone brought up edging, I was confused, but everything makes sense now.

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