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Thread: data sonification helps to make a killing at the stock mark

  1. #1
    eltamina
    Guest

    data sonification helps to make a killing at the stock mark


    I am a sound junky. I ran across this guy Jonathan Berger's (not to be confused with Wilhelm Peterson- Berger) website. He is a music associate prof at Stanford, who is into: Sonification of Complex Data (whatever that means)

    www-ccrma.stanford.edu/~brg/

    <strong>Our aim is to find an auditory representation of multidimensional data that is intuitive, easy to learn, and ammenable to comparing multiple data sets simultaneously. Possible examples include meteorological data (in which temperature, humidity, pressure etc. are changing and interdependent), stock market data (following price and volume of trade of different stocks), or medical data. </strong>

    I have no idea what that means, here is the page to the sonification of some stock data:

    www-ccrma.stanford.edu/gr...index.html

    Select stock from the left hand column. There are samples of Intel stocks etc. I listened to it, I am totally lost.

    He is also a composer, here are some audio samples of his compositions:

    www-ccrma.stanford.edu/~brg/comp.html

    I understand the composition samples better. Anyway bottom line is, is there an opportunity for stock market earnings if we follow this sonification thing.

  2. #2
    mathman444
    Guest

    Re: data sonification helps to make a killing at the stock m


    Well, I've just spent a couple of hours reading about this topic, from the links that you provided. How do you find this stuff? It is a cool concept. My best friend in college wrote his PhD thesis on computer programs that compose music. Some of it wasn't too bad, especially works such as rounds that involve counterpoint. Computer analysis of sound (based on inversion of Fourier series) is a very well advanced science, which is also closely related to imaging techniques such as CT scans.

    Aside: Joseph Fourier

    www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/...urier.html

    was a French mathematician who was obsessed by the concept of heat. He was cold all the time and he spent most of his life bundled up in front of a roaring fire. His analysis of heat (scroll down to "On the Propagation of Heat in Solid Bodies") eventually established that anything that is propagated in waves (heat, light, sound) can be decomposed into elementary sine and cosine functions. In particular, his work on boundary value problems in partial differential equationsis became the basis of our understanding of accoustical architecture.

    Anyway, using a computer to analyze sounds (and other collections of complex overlain data) is by now quite a well developed area of inquiry in which advances are made daily.

    But this "Sonification of complex data," developed by the interdisciplinary music/computer program at Stanford, takes the opposite point of view. By encoding large amounts of data as "music" (or anyway, as sounds), this may enable human researchers to use their inborn sound pattern recognition talents to notice patterns (in the stock market, for instance) that would otherwise be lost in a vast and comfusing sea of data that no one can understyand because we don't really know what we are looking for. An interesting concept.

    Why do human beings (and other animals) like music in the first place? Some of the papers on this topic believe that the talent to recognize "pleasing" combinations of sounds is a natural consequence of
    survival driven abilities to respond to auditory signals in the environment, and, in humans anyway, to communicate with each other with an astonishing variety of shouts, barks, clicks, whistles, hoots and hollars, as well as by beating on our chests or on hollow logs with a stick. So (these researchers argue) it is not too farfetched to imagine that the complicated data of the modern world can likewaise be communicated and understood by reducing meanings to sound, in the same way that drawing a graph presents to the eye a summary of data in a form that we are well equipped by evlolution and natural selection to be able to make sense of.

    Well, it's probably a crock. You can make anything sound plausible by using a lot of big words. But I don't think our ears are that good. I'll wait and see whether these guys strike it rich in the stock market.

    Mathman

  3. #3
    emiC
    Guest

    subjective feeling of cold is a function of????


    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Fourier was obsessed by the concept of heat. He was cold all the time and he spent most of his life bundled up in front of a roaring fire. [/quote]

    Just my intuitition, nothing scientific, I think subjective feeling of heat/ cold is not just a function of external temperature. Temp sensors both peripherally and centrally in the <strong>brain</strong> are involved. There must be a cultural/ behavioral component too. Why didn't Fourier pursue the biological/ physiological aspect of the heat / cold topic. Interesting he went into the physics side. Ah... answer is in the neuronal connections in his <strong>brain</strong>?

    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>His analysis of heat scroll down to "On the Propagation of Heat in Solid Bodies eventually established that anything that is propagated in waves (heat, light, sound) can be decomposed into elementary sine and cosine functions. In particular, his work on boundary value problems in partial differential equationsis became the basis of our understanding of accoustical architecture[/quote]

    Intuitively, it is easier for me to understand wave being decomposed into sine and cosine functions. OTOH compressing data into sound (wave) is more difficult for me to conceptualize? Why is that? Wiring in my <strong>brain</strong>?

    <span style="color:red;font-size:small;">I manage to sneak "brain" in three times. </span> :rollin: :rollin:


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