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Thread: Relearning?

  1. #1
    Dreaming and dancing Bennett's Avatar
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    Relearning?

    I used to figure skate for six years when I was a kid. But I quitted it after I became busy with my school. I haven't gone to the rink for really a long time. Now I only do ballet.

    I am curious if I can skate again. I don't think that I can jump well (I never liked jumps in the first place). But it would be nice if I could spin again. During the period of time I was gradually quitting FS, I remember losing the techniques from the most difficult to the easiest---just one by one. Last time I went there (already a year ago), I could only do regular layback, sit, camel, and upright and felt dizzy I was also too scared to jump. It's kind of irretating for not being able to do what you could do before.

    Does anyone have experience of learning FS as a kid and restart it as an adult? If so, do you take lessons? Have you been able to relearn what you were able to do before?

    I am also interested in ice dancing. I recall a lot of adults learning ice dancing. Would you recommend to adult skaters ice-dancing over single?

    Also how much shall I expect to pay for the lesson for single and for ice-dancing? I recall my parents paying like $50 per 30 mins when I was a kid. I am afraid that it can be even more expensive now.
    Last edited by Bennett; 12-09-2007 at 11:25 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bennett View Post
    I am curious if I can skate again. I don't think that I can jump well (I never liked jumps in the first place). But it would be nice if I could spin again. During the period of time I was gradually quitting FS, I remember losing the techniques from the most difficult to the easiest---just one by one. Last time I went there (already a year ago), I could only do regular layback, sit, camel, and upright and felt dizzy I was also too scared to jump. It's kind of irretating for not being able to do what you could do before.
    Try again if you're interested. You probably won't be able to do everything the first time back, but each time you go again it will get easier and soon you should be able to do most of what you used to do.

    Does anyone have experience of learning FS as a kid and restart it as an adult? If so, do you take lessons? Have you been able to relearn what you were able to do before?
    Yes, I skated for a couple of years in my early teens and came back in my early 30s. Within a couple weeks I could pretty much do everything I used to except (single) lutz and axel, and some of my spins were actually better than when I was a kid. I did eventually get the lutz and axel back and get closer to double sals than when I quit, but then I cut back on jumping because of various injuries and they're probably gone for good again. But at everything besides jumps I'm better than I was as a teenager.

    I am also interested in ice dancing. I recall a lot of adults learning ice dancing. Would you recommend to adult skaters ice-dancing over single?
    Definitely give it a try if there are opportunities available, and see how you like it.
    I had not ice danced as a kid and I took a few years of lessons as an adult and passed 2 2/3 dance tests before deciding to concentrate on singles before I got too old to jump at all. The lessons are certainly valuable for basic skating technique, and if you have opportunities to skate with one or more partners it can be a fun thing to do socially.

    Also how much shall I expect to pay for the lesson for single and for ice-dancing? I recall my parents paying like $50 per 30 mins when I was a kid. I am afraid that it can be even more expensive now.
    That's about what I'm paying now, plus a few more dollars for the ice time . . . and then with additional practices, it can end up being about $100 a week for half an hour of lesson and 4-5 hours of skating. Depending where you live you may find some coaches who charge less, you may find empty public sessions you can practice on instead of freestyles, you could practice less often or take shorter lessons or take lessons every other week, or whatever you can work out to be able to afford it. Obviously, the more often you skate and have lessons, the quicker you'll progress, either in recovering old skills or learning new ones.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    I skated until about 16 and then went off to college. When I was in my late 20s, I started skating again. I currently have regained all my skills that were lost and several new ones as well. If you are going to start again, you need to make sure you do it consistently.

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    Dreaming and dancing Bennett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    Try again if you're interested. You probably won't be able to do everything the first time back, but each time you go again it will get easier and soon you should be able to do most of what you used to do.



    Yes, I skated for a couple of years in my early teens and came back in my early 30s. Within a couple weeks I could pretty much do everything I used to except (single) lutz and axel, and some of my spins were actually better than when I was a kid. I did eventually get the lutz and axel back and get closer to double sals than when I quit, but then I cut back on jumping because of various injuries and they're probably gone for good again. But at everything besides jumps I'm better than I was as a teenager.



    Definitely give it a try if there are opportunities available, and see how you like it.
    I had not ice danced as a kid and I took a few years of lessons as an adult and passed 2 2/3 dance tests before deciding to concentrate on singles before I got too old to jump at all. The lessons are certainly valuable for basic skating technique, and if you have opportunities to skate with one or more partners it can be a fun thing to do socially.



    That's about what I'm paying now, plus a few more dollars for the ice time . . . and then with additional practices, it can end up being about $100 a week for half an hour of lesson and 4-5 hours of skating. Depending where you live you may find some coaches who charge less, you may find empty public sessions you can practice on instead of freestyles, you could practice less often or take shorter lessons or take lessons every other week, or whatever you can work out to be able to afford it. Obviously, the more often you skate and have lessons, the quicker you'll progress, either in recovering old skills or learning new ones.

    Good luck!
    Thank you so much gkelly for your detailed explanations. I am very appreciative. It is really admirable that you regained what you were able to do before within a couple weeks! It is also encouraging to hear that you are now even better.

    Thank you for your thoughts on ice-dancing. I agree that it will help basic skating skills. Although I used to find watching ice-dancing boring when I was younger, I have come to have a greater appreciation of it. Since I do some ball room dancing nowadays, I can see that it may be socially fun as well.

    Thank you for your advice on costs, too! Although I don't think that I can afford the time to skate 4-5 hours a week, I would love to try taking lessons again.
    Last edited by Bennett; 12-10-2007 at 10:07 PM.

  5. #5
    Dreaming and dancing Bennett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mskater93 View Post
    I skated until about 16 and then went off to college. When I was in my late 20s, I started skating again. I currently have regained all my skills that were lost and several new ones as well. If you are going to start again, you need to make sure you do it consistently.
    Wow you regained all your skills that were lost and have learned new ones! That's great!

    Yes, I agree that practicing consistently would be the key! Thank you for your advice, mskater93. I really appreciate it.

  6. #6
    Beliver in Sasha's Perfect Program Tinymavy15's Avatar
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    The best coaches are 40 dollars for 20 min now, but most are more like 30 for 20min-30min. I am surprised that coaches were that much years ago!

  7. #7
    Dreaming and dancing Bennett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinymavy15 View Post
    The best coaches are 40 dollars for 20 min now, but most are more like 30 for 20min-30min. I am surprised that coaches were that much years ago!
    Thanks for your info. It wasn't in the US. Also it was a famous coach. The most reasonable coach that I knew of was $20 per 30 min.

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