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Thread: Too Late to Compete? Standard Track vs. Adult

  1. #1
    it's olympic season :D bethissoawesome's Avatar
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    Too Late to Compete? Standard Track vs. Adult

    I posted awhile back about starting skating at a late age (I was 20 at the time). Since then (minus a period of time when I had a concussion), I've been skating upwards of 15 hours a week... kind of beside the point... but here is the question. I've now been skating for 2 years, because I had a background in dance in gymnastics, things came pretty quickly. I'm landing two triples extremely consistently (loop and toeloop) and can pull off a 3T-2L, sal and double axel are coming along but more on the inconsistent side (lutz and flip are VERY VERY VERY inconsistent). Spirals are good, spins are good (better in position than rotation), footwork and skating skills need a lot of work.

    BUT I have yet to take a single figure skating test. To my own embarrassment *blush*, one reason I haven't done any testing is pure stage fright. I don't know what avenue to pursue, the standard or adult route. Competing on the standard amateur level seems pretty silly to start doing at my age, but I really just don't know. My coach wants it to be my decision, but any input would help. Thanks in advance
    Last edited by bethissoawesome; 12-28-2007 at 08:46 PM.

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    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Considering there has not been a lady at Adult Nationals who landed a triple, why not go for standard track where you can challenge yourself? Many ladies are truly ladies (20+) at standard track nationals in the Senior ranks. You wouldn't be silly if you worked on your deficiencies AND you'd truly be an inspiration!!

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    You don't have to do one or the other. You can do both. But if you have everything through 2Lz and can land a double-double combination you have all the jumps you need to pass the complete standard test structure through Senior. Many people would find that a more satisfying accomplishment than just passing the adult tests. If you are a nervous tester, you are going to be nervous no matter what track you follow, so you might as well go for it all. Also passing the standard tests gives you more options for the adults events you can compete in.

    You don't say if you are working on MITF. Remember to take the free skating tests you have to do the MITF also. If you don't have time/interest to do them all then maybe the adult track would be better for you since there are only four adult MITF tests.

  4. #4
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Actually, you can't compete qualifying events (Regionals) and Adult events in the same season, but you could try one and then the other...

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    But you can do both test structures simultaneously.

    If the question is about competing, as opposed to just testing, another factor to consider is that at 22 you could not compete in the standard track until you have passed your Novice FS and MITF tests (other than Open Juvenile where you would be mixed in with girls mainly 13-16). So you would have quite a few tests to pass before you got started. In the adult competition track you would have fewer test to pass before you could start competing.

    And there is no reason to feel shy about trying to compete at Novice at 22. I know a few skaters who have competed in Novice who were 20, and in Junior and Senior there are plenty of ladies competing who are in their 20s (and late 20s at that).

    Sounds to me like you really want to try the standard track but are afraid you will look out of place. Once you get to Novice I don't think that would be true. Also, if you are mainly thinking of competing in local competitions, you "only" have to pass the Intermediate tests to compete at Novice, since nearly all local competiitons allow you to skate up a level.
    Last edited by gsrossano; 12-29-2007 at 01:52 PM.

  6. #6
    Beliver in Sasha's Perfect Program Tinymavy15's Avatar
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    well the first thing i would do is pass all those moves in the field tests. no matter how good you are to jumps (and you learned AMAZINGLY fast) those moves tests take a long time. By the time you got to the junior or senior level ( the only levels you could compete at when you are over 20 years old you would be like 4 years older. However, if you decide in 4 years... or however long it takes you to finish testing that you are too old and want to do adults, all the tests transfr over, meaning that if you passed the senior moves you would be considered a Adlut Masters Senior. So i would start testing the standard USFSA tests, esp the moves. You have to test the moves before the freeskate.

    good luck and feel free to PM me if you need more info.

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    Don't forget that there are age restrictions in Junior - so your only competitive options would be to Novice or Senior.....Junior is under 19 as of July 1st for singles - an ISU rule.

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    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    The Junior rule is only internationally. At the National level, there are no age restrictions at Novice or higher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mskater93 View Post
    The Junior rule is only internationally. At the National level, there are no age restrictions at Novice or higher.
    Exectly right. USFSA rules 3640, 3650, 3660. No age restrictions for Novice and above in USFSA competition.

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    Sorry- most countries follow ISU rules and have age limits on Junior....Didn't know the US was different!

  11. #11
    Moving up the testing structure Kypma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhotcoach View Post
    Sorry- most countries follow ISU rules and have age limits on Junior....Didn't know the US was different!
    Well, Canada follows the ISU guidelines for juniors except for pairs, in which there are no age restrictions. See this link: http://www.skatecanada.ca/en/skate_f...TOKEN=10761928 Also, aren't adul tracks limited to adults over 25 years of age?

    Kypma

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kypma View Post
    Also, aren't adul tracks limited to adults over 25 years of age?
    Used to be over 24, but it is now 21.

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    I think your accomplishmnents are really amazing. I have never heard of an adult skater (beginning as an adult) learning up to and including triple jumps in two years (or any year period!). So, it sounds like you have a lot of natural talent. It also sounds like you are competitive. 22 is actually not that out of place! There are a host of senior competitors in their twenties. I would say go for the standard track just because you'll challenge yourself more and you have greater goals in the future (ie. moving up to senior level).

  14. #14
    Tripping on the Podium
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    I would also agree that you should go through the Standard track. At a certain point it will grandfather you in to the Adult track anyway. But if you're nervous about testing, you'll be nervous about competing too: it's still done in front of judges! So just get the testing done and start competing when you can.

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    Manleywoman has a good point. I've taught quite a few adults over the years at all levels, and found that the learn-to-skate adults were quite interested in passing badges - once they switched into the test stream, were often reluctant to test at all. In fact, I have one adult who started in learn-to-skate with a group of adults about 8 years ago - and is the only one to have tested freeskate, dance and artistic (to the gold level!). Many of the adults tested lower level dances, and one did finish her Gold dances - but refused to challenge herself with freeskate and artistic tests, except at the very low levels because she wanted to
    'win' all the competitions in her age categories......One guy tested only his preliminary dances - and competes at that level - but could pass his golds in no time.

    The adult skater who stuck with the standard test stream failed numerous times and tests - but in the end has the satisfaction of learning to deal with failure (a good life skill) and the satisfaction of learning to handle nerves while achieving her goals.

    So try as many standard tests as you can - realizing that your fear of failure will get in the way but eventually you will learn how to compete - and the feeling of success will be ever so sweet!

    Dreams are a combination of hard work and determination.

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