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Thread: How to improve a "turnout" off ice?

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    Question How to improve a "turnout" off ice?

    How can I improve my turnout off-ice?

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    Rinkside
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    ballet!

    Ballet is a great way to do it. In addition someone who knows how to stretch (preferably someone with dance training) can help you set up a program. It involves a combination of strengthening specific rotating muscles, and learning to relax other muscles that work in opposition. It also involves stretching, and it takes a while to find the rotators. Like all the rest in skating, diligence is the key. The sooner you start, the better.

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    Sitting Here on Blue Jay Way silver.blades's Avatar
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    I agree ballet is a good way to work turnout, but keep in mind that your turnout might not get any better beacuse of your bone and muscle structure.
    Also try this stretch: go into the side splits and roll through to your stomach. Rest your head on your hands and keep your spine and neck in alignment. bring the bottoms of your feet together and try to align them with your neck and spine. Then let gravity pull them down. This should help to open up your hips.

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    Brazilian Eurotrash beep_beep's Avatar
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    Sit on a buttefly position (is this how it's called in English?): sit on the floor, bring your feet in front of your body and keep them together sole to sole Get your knees as apart you can. To help, put your hands on your knees and put the weight of your body on them, trying to get them to touch the floor.
    http://www.tinajuanfitness.info/exer...lystretch.html

    Something a bit more eficient is lie on the floor on your stomach, get your legs and feet on the same position as said before and let the weight of your body pull you down. Don't forget to keep your back straight.
    http://www.balletpeeking.com/y002/y002012l.jpg
    Last edited by beep_beep; 07-07-2008 at 08:08 AM. Reason: add pictures...

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    it's olympic season :D bethissoawesome's Avatar
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    There is also something called a Thai massage. It's almost like assisted yoga... Basically, you lay on a table and someone stretches you out while massaging the muscles as they are stretched. It's really great for hip flexibility and lower back. There are many stretches that you can't do without someone assisting you. Also, a lot of gyms have trainers specifically for stretching and flexibility. If you tell them what you need to work on... they will guide you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beep_beep View Post
    Sit on a buttefly position (is this how it's called in English?): sit on the floor, bring your feet in front of your body and keep them together sole to sole Get your knees as apart you can. To help, put your hands on your knees and put the weight of your body on them, trying to get them to touch the floor.
    http://www.tinajuanfitness.info/exer...lystretch.html

    Something a bit more eficient is lie on the floor on your stomach, get your legs and feet on the same position as said before and let the weight of your body pull you down. Don't forget to keep your back straight.
    http://www.balletpeeking.com/y002/y002012l.jpg
    Both of these are excellent and do not strain your knees. Whatever you do, you want to make sure your knees stay facing the same direction as your toes, which is why the "frog" stretch (stomach down to the floor) is so much better than just trying to turn your feet out with straight legs.
    However, if you have closed hips, you will never be able to get 180 degree turnout without straining your knees, so if you don't achieve hip and knee turnout after doing these for awhile, I'd suggest leaving it alone. This is not just a matter of stretching muscles and ligaments; it's a fundamental difference in the structure of the hip joint, which is hereditary and cannot be changed by stretching.

  7. #7
    Landing my axel..............again skatergirl45's Avatar
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    Stand in a spread eagle position(if you can) or you can have your feet a little more pointed forwards and then go down in a squat pressing your knees outward.
    It feels like you are in some weird pre-labor pregnancy class but works. lol

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    Thanks everybody for your helpful hints!

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatergirl45 View Post
    Stand in a spread eagle position(if you can) or you can have your feet a little more pointed forwards and then go down in a squat pressing your knees outward.
    It feels like you are in some weird pre-labor pregnancy class but works. lol
    Yes, this is a good one, too. This is actually what I do on the ice before doing any spread eagles or Ina Bauers, using the boards to make sure the turnout is coming from my hips, not my knees. With your knees bent, turn your feet out against the boards, then--keeping your knees bent--push your pelvis forward. Keep the insides of your knees pressed against the boards so that your knees have to stay turned out and lined up over your toes as you slowly straighten your legs into spread eagle position. If your knees don't stay turned out and lined up over your toes as you straighten your legs, bend your knees again and just press your pelvis forward for awhile. You should feel it in your hips.
    Last edited by vlaurend; 07-09-2008 at 08:24 PM.

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