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Thread: ISI vs. USFS

  1. #1
    Rinkside
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    Question ISI vs. USFS

    Greetings,
    I was brought up competing through USFS and have taught Basic Skills and lower level students within that program. I am now working with an ISI learn to skate program and it's quite different. I'm also a bit confused on how the testing of private students works, do they have to go to a test session similar to USFS and what level in ISI is similar to no-test of pre-pre in USFS? I have ordered the rule books but am looking for insight. Would a student who has through a flip jump with average spins and edges be able to do no-test? And no-test still actually has to take a test?
    Help?
    -bobby

  2. #2
    Rinkside
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    I am unsure of that information you are looking for, as ISI doesnt have non test, just usfsa.
    ISI 6 and below are passed by a coach.You have a form and mark what elements and a number. ISI 7 has to be done by three gold judges, and ISI 8,9 and 10 has been to either be sent in to HQ to be reviewed or judged at ISI Worlds.
    There is a comparsion chart somewhere but I think ISI 3 /4 is pre pre and ISI 5 is pre pre with axel.Non test would be ISI 4 I would guess.

  3. #3
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    Here are the test requirements. Look at FS 1-10:
    http://www.skateisi.com/site/sub.cfm...g_requirements

  4. #4
    Beliver in Sasha's Perfect Program Tinymavy15's Avatar
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    ISI is much less structured than USFSA, and in my opinion, a better way for young skaters to start off. There are no "offical" tests where skaters have to sign up and perform moves in the field in front of judges. If the skaters are in group lessons, they usually go through one level a semester. For example, in the spring session that would last from feb-may or whatever, a coach would teach them layback, axel, lutz, and camel for freestyle 5 level. At the end of the session the coach would just check off a card for each student that they had learned the required moves for each level. If you looks at ISI competitions you will find a list of elements that are expected at each level.

    as for the skater you mentioned...if the highest jump she can do is the flip, i would say either freestyle 3 or 4...probably 4.

    hope i helped!

  5. #5
    Rinkside
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    I just wanted to mention that the requirements to pass an isi test differ depending on the district your rink is in. In my district, we require fs 1-6 test on a test session at our rink when they want to pass. They must pass 2 out of 3 judges (who are just coaches at the rink). They are only allowed to miss one element in their program, which can be reskated at the end to retry it. We are in a competitive district and we have strict testing requirements. Fs 7-9 have to sign up on a special test session where there are 3 gold certified judges.

  6. #6
    Mrs. Roman Kostomarov icedancingnut31's Avatar
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    I skate ISI. ISI there are basic skills levels Pre-Alpha to Delta. Then people can go into either Freestyle (Jumps and Spins), Dance, Pairs, Couples and Figures. There are 10 levels in each of those divisions like Freestyle 1, 2,3,4 all the way untill 10. Any level including tot which is beginners who have just started skating can compete. ISI also has a special skater program for people with special needs. In Pre-Alpha through Delta, skaters pass informally with just the elements but at least in Freestyle,skaters need a program as well. There are no moves in the field but at least in Freestyle we do have required dance step patterns. I am currently in Freestyle 4 where there is a flip, loop, half loop, 2 back spirals, a sit spin and a dance step. ISI is more recreational than USFSA which is more competitive. But some skaters skate both. Rohene Ward passed Freestyle 10. I started seriously skating when I was 15 and now I am 20 and because I am a full time college student, I have not done anything with USFSA.

  7. #7
    Landing my axel..............again skatergirl45's Avatar
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    Hi-

    I am a USFS member and an ISI one. I have never tested/competed ISI. I am considering competing ISI in a few months. I would be Freestyle 6. Would I need to test ISI before I compete? Or, do I just need my coach to see that I can do the elements? Also, does my coach need to be an ISI member for me to compete ISI?

    Thank you in advance....

  8. #8
    On the Ice
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    Your coach doesn't have to be a member but the coach or official that monitors your test does. You can take several tests in one day as I remember. I stopped at FS4 because of the axel. There are several footwork patterns that you have to have in your FS for each level. Go to the ISI site, it is very informative. Good luck. The adults in ISI are a great bunch of people.

  9. #9
    Custom Title
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatergirl45 View Post
    Hi-

    I am a USFS member and an ISI one. I have never tested/competed ISI. I am considering competing ISI in a few months. I would be Freestyle 6. Would I need to test ISI before I compete? Or, do I just need my coach to see that I can do the elements? Also, does my coach need to be an ISI member for me to compete ISI?

    Thank you in advance....
    You should have your coach look at the requirements and be sure there is enough time to test you and have the results sent to ISI long before the event is scheduled. Results need to be received by ISI at least 30 days prior to your event.

    You will have to test through each level, there is a "moves" type of test and a freestyle test. Both are fairly simple and straighforward. You do get a re-skate for each element (moves & freestyle). The freestyle is done with a time limit and not usually done with music (unless it gets you right-of-way during your skating session-we did it that way).

    The highest level passed is submitted to ISI. That's pretty much it-plain and simple and much easier than USFS. The ISI people are very friendly and you should call and order a manual if you have time-it's very useful.

    I skated USFS but switched over to ISI and really enjoy the relaxed atmosphere and the more even playing field during competitions. When you compete, concentrate on the "dance steps" which is the footwork portion-some people only focus on the jumps and spins and their footwork falls apart-you can really lose points doing this.

    Membership to ISI is inexpensive and you can join for 2 years at a time. When you call to join you can order your manual.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Skate@Delaware; 08-31-2009 at 10:26 AM. Reason: adding something

  10. #10
    Mrs. Roman Kostomarov icedancingnut31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatergirl45 View Post
    Hi-

    I am a USFS member and an ISI one. I have never tested/competed ISI. I am considering competing ISI in a few months. I would be Freestyle 6. Would I need to test ISI before I compete? Or, do I just need my coach to see that I can do the elements? Also, does my coach need to be an ISI member for me to compete ISI?

    Thank you in advance....
    Yes, you need to test in ISI in order to compete. My coach is an ISI judge and referee so she is really knowledgeable like this. But also ISI has new open events for people who have never competed ISI and they are grouped in level groups called Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum. As a freestyle 6 you would compete in Gold which consists of Freestyle 5 and 6. There are no required elements and you can do moves from Freestyle 6 and below. And you can compete in any event. You could also compete in regular ISI as a Freestyle 6 (but they may make the groups in to open freestyle in some events and you will be put with other levels), which is stricter but open freestyle is a great program.

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