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Thread: Fibonacci, Music and Skating

  1. #16
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    there was one professor of physics (greek) in my uni that had analyze michell's and plush jumps concerning their torsional movement , collecting of arms and impetus and how they preserve the angular momentum, for his class while watching 2004 worlds, I read it years later but it was fun!
    Fibonacci regarding skates and figure skating in general is a great idea for master thesis!
    well if you understand Cop , greek language is easier to get
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    I'm on it! Already I see that there are 13 hooks and eyes on a skating boot.
    LOL!

  2. #17
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    .. and i used to like you here..it was one of the rare moments with extremely luck and guts and it wont happen in this century again, promise.
    No piano, but i know reed organit goes simpler than this if you consider 8 notes in octave and 13 piano keys, all fibonacci nunbers
    I was cheering for Greece in Euro Cup and agree it was a gutty, determined game they played in the final (and for entire tournament)

    One more thing about the keys - the black keys are in groups of : 2+3 = 5 in an octave.
    So I need to know did the Egyptians figure this Golden ratio, 1.61803,,,,,,, before the Greeks? (The great pyramids are older than the Parthenon )

  3. #18
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    I'm on it! Already I see that there are 13 hooks and eyes on a skating boot.

    http://visual.merriam-webster.com/im...gure-skate.jpg

    Unbelievable Or did I stumble across a real skating secret??

  4. #19
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    egyptians had such a perfect mathematic and astronomic system so probably they had discovered φ number before anyone else..but I know nothing on egyptians and fibonacci, i cant help!!
    history mathematics and fs in one, my brain is flambée right now

  5. #20
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    well if you understand Cop , greek language is easier to get [/S


  6. #21
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    dont laugh, Even fibonacci proof seems mush easier.I wonder if egyptians could figure out jump rules/marks or Cop would make them wanna jump off the pyramids, pretty much what happens also to the average fs fan.

  7. #22
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    dont laugh, Even fibonacci proof seems mush easier.I wonder if egyptians could figure out jump rules/marks or Cop would make them wanna jump off the pyramids, pretty much what happens also to the average fs fan.
    - :chorus:

    Are you always this funny when you are sleep deprived?

    Seriously though, I think Mishin has the secret of the Golden ratio.
    Human genetics are based on this Golden ratio. That is what scientists follow for cloning. That finaly explains this "mini-Plushenko to me.
    Even the nose of mini- Plushenko is an exact replica of original Plushenko. That could only be possible through cloning and Golden ratio.

  8. #23
    The King has arrived - no questions! plushyta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janetfan View Post
    Seriously though, I think Mishin has the secret of the Golden ratio.
    Human genetics are based on this Golden ratio. That is what scientists follow for cloning. That finaly explains this "mini-Plushenko to me.

    Even the nose of mini- Plushenko is an exact replica of original Plushenko. That could only be possible through cloning and Golden ratio.
    Mishin has a "magic vest"

    Someone has already mentioned the impact of Plushy's nose in balancing during jumps

  9. #24
    Rinkside
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    Quote Originally Posted by janetfan View Post
    Does the Fibonacci sequence occur in, or apply to figure skating?
    Hmmm, good question. Thanks for giving me an idea for my thesis!

  10. #25
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janetfan View Post
    - :chorus:
    Even the nose of mini- Plushenko is an exact replica of original Plushenko. That could only be possible through cloning and Golden ratio.
    I know you enjoy the mini plushy clone thing but artur's nose is quite cute and in general i dont see much resemblance with plush on ice or off ice. The bad thing with that boy is that everyone expected him to be plushenko No2 from his 14 years and that put pressure on him, maybe he will blossom later.
    Here is 2008 exhibition of arthur skating to adagio , i think he is more artistic skater than plush and naturally more cop friendly http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb3pN1zYNJA

    hey mm you deleted your students paper? I was about to have an eye on it, I had an interesting conversation in the morning about egyptian maths
    Last edited by seniorita; 06-09-2009 at 06:09 AM.

  11. #26
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    hey mm you deleted your students paper? I was about to have an eye on it, I had an interesting conversation in the morning about egyptian maths
    I think you have to subscribe to the journal in order to read it on line. You can probably access it from a university network, since most universities subscribe. (The Fibonacci Quarterly is kind of a niche journal, as the name suggests.)

    If you Google the author's name you can find the actual thesis itself, which is longer but much easier to read because it contains more expository material. This, however, also is available only through inter-university llibrary loan. We wrote up a version of the results for the lay audience and submitted it to Scientific American (a pop science magazine widely read in the U.S.), but it was not accepted for publication. (Oh well, like Sasha in the Grand Prix, I already have tenure. )

    About the Egyptians, I think it is a stretch of the evidence to conjecture that they knew or cared anything about the golden ratio. Thousands of documents have been preserved from dynastic times, but only four have any real mathematical content, the most famous being the Ahmose, or Rhind, papyrus.

    The relative dimensions of the pyramids were determined by a ratio called the seked -- what we now call the cotangent. The great pyramids had a seked of either five palms one finger or five palms two fingers. This means that the pyramid rises one royal cubit in height for every 5.25 or 5.5 palms in horizontal distance.

    A royal cubit was 7 palms, so this gives a raio of 7/5.25 = 1.333 -- somewhat smaller than the golden ratio (sqrt(5)+1)/2 = 1.618.

    (Now you are probably wondering why the royal cubic was so big. The Pharaoh, being a god, naturally had longer forearms than anyone else. A cubit is the distance from your elbow to the tip of your fingers. The common cubit, which was used in Egypt for less grand construction projects than the great pyramids, was 6 palms, which is about right, if you measure your cubit agains your palm. (A "palm" is four fingers -- don't count your thumb. ) Etymology: Latin "cubitum = elbow," from the Latin root word for "lying down," the idea being that the Romans reclined on their elbows for feasts).
    Last edited by Mathman; 06-09-2009 at 11:26 AM.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    About the Egyptians, I think it is a stretch of the evidence to conjecture that they knew or cared anything about the golden ratio. Thousands of documents have been preserved from dynastic times, but only four have any real mathematical content, the most famous being the Ahmose, or Rhind, papyrus.

    The relative dimensions of the pyramids were determined by a ratio called the seked -- what we know call the cotangent. The great pyramids had a seked of either five palms one finger or five palms two fingers. This means that the pyramid rises one royal cubit in height for every 5.25 or 5.5 palms in horizontal distance.

    A royal cubit was 7 palms, so this gives a raio of 7/5.25 = 1.333 -- somewhat smaller than the golden ratio (sqrt(5)+1)/2 = 1.618.
    )
    Thanks for sharing that information. I am sure seniorita will be glad to hear 1.6 belongs to the Greeks afterall.
    Spirals were mentioned before - but is there anyway to explain Caroline's "pearl" position? Would pi be more applicable than phi - since her bending ability seems to be infinite?
    (Sorry if that is too dopey - I should have taken more math courses back in the day.)
    Last edited by janetfan; 06-09-2009 at 10:50 AM.

  13. #28
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    i asked them in the morning about our last night conversation and they didnt know about fibonacci and egyptians thats why i was curious to see it, the conversation ended up talking about their approach to π along with indians, which looked easier for skating relation
    what you mean niche journal?
    Thanx for info I will find a way to search now I m free for the summer

  14. #29
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    i asked them in the morning about our last night conversation and they didnt know about fibonacci and egyptians thats why i was curious to see it, the conversation ended up talking about their approach to π along with indians, which looked easier for skating relation.

    what you mean niche journal?

    Thanx for info I will find a way to search now I m free for the summer
    Here is a good way to determine the value of π. Take a string as long as you are tall. Now wrap it around your head. How many times does it go around? About 3.14?

    By the way, the value of π in the real world depends on the curvature of space-time. If space is positively curved, then π is slightly smaller than 3.14159..., and if space is negatively curved, then π is slightly greater than the Euclidean value.

    One way that cosmologists try to determine the curvature of the universe is by computing the ratio of the surface area to the radius of large imaginary spheres, using information from distance quasars and supernovae.

    By a "niche journal" I mean one that is dedicated to one particular narrow topic -- Fibonacci numbers, in this case -- rather than a general mathematics journal that publishes papers on a broad spectrum of topics.

    If you seriously want to learn something about Egyptian mathematics you could start with primary documents such as the Rhind (Ahmose) Mathematical Papyrus. Assuming that you don't read the archaic Coptic language , there is an excellent translation into English by Robins and Shute, complete with photocopies of the document itself.

    Ahmose (Ahmes) was the Egyptian scribe whose copy (16th centruty B.C.) has come down to us. Rhind was the rich British traveller who acquired the document from 19th century A.D. grave robbers and bequeathed it to the British Museum.

    If you can't find the article that I referenced, here is another one (by three more of my students ) on a similar theme.

    http://www.ams.org/mcom/2000-69-229/...88-1/home.html
    Last edited by Mathman; 06-09-2009 at 01:15 PM.

  15. #30
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janetfan View Post
    Spirals were mentioned before - but is there anyway to explain Caroline's "pearl" position?
    Hmmm...

    http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Mathematic...07/CourseHome/

    http://web.icenetwork.com/images/200...8/RfaMqwn3.jpg

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