Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 47

Thread: Help for FS-watching newbie

  1. #16
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    3,799
    Quote Originally Posted by cvg16 View Post
    Oh, I see. My approach is slightly wrong then. I barely look at the skaters' feet and I mostly just focus on the body lines. I'll try it your way for the next few videos. Thanks!
    Well, it depends what you're watching for.

    If you want to understand the results of the sporting event, what the blades are doing on the ice is by far the most important thing.

    If you just want to get aesthetic pleasure from watching the movement to music, then focus on whatever provides you the most pleasure.

  2. #17
    Throwing tomatoes at corrupt judges Audrey19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    268
    I'm going to do pairs:
    The very first to mention should be Belousova & Protopopov: they were (are) true artists, IMO the best pair skaters ever.
    Moonlight sonata EX 1970: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKSk0...eature=related
    Unfortunately you can't find that much of them on youtube...
    Gordeeva & Grinkov 1994 olympics EX:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW3AE09j8O4
    "Lady Caliph" by Berezhnaya & Shikarulidze is probably the best pairs short program ever, but it has been mentioned already. Here's their swan lake SP from 1998: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJCGGBmCmf0
    Shen & Zhao's Turandot from worlds 2003 is legendary as well, here's the nutcracker from 2004: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHQRfNDX3kI
    And not to forget our reigning world champions savchenko & Szolkowy!
    The mission, FS from 2007, unfortunately with terrible commentary that destroys the whole atmosphere and makes it difficult to enjoy the program...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBRKR8y9GPs

    Enjoy!

  3. #18
    On the Ice
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    37
    Wow, I am developing new appreciation for pairs...and falling in love with Gordeeva and Grinkov. Amazing!

    I'm hoping the same happens for ice dance. But I just can't get into it because I don't know what actually to watch for - no throws and jumps. I guess this is the discipline where feet-watching is a must.

    Thanks again for the videos!

  4. #19
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Kenai, AK
    Posts
    18,659
    skating is not all about jumps and throws.

  5. #20
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    3,799
    For ice dance, yes, watching the feet is extra important for understanding the results. It's also really hard to tell skating quality from video, especially tiny youtube videos, so don't worry if your preferences in terms of enjoyment have nothing to do with the results.

    Ice dancers tend to be better than freestylers about skating to the music and performing for the audience, so it's easy to enjoy the dances on that basis without worrying about the sporting aspects.

    The rules and trends have changed over the years. Originally ice dance was all about translating ballroom and other social dances to the ice. Then stage dance influences and theatricalism ended up having more of an impact in the 1980s, mostly as a result of the influence of Torvill and Dean.

    This is the classic: Bolero


    Here's a variety of some significant free dances from the late 80s and 90s; you can probably find at least one you enjoy:

    Duchesnays 1988

    Wilson and McCall 1988

    Rahkomo and Kokko 1991

    Klimova and Ponomarenko 1992

    Usova and Zhulin 1992

    Grishuk and Platov 1994

    Krylova and Ovsiannikov 1997

    Bourne and Kraatz 1998

    Anissina and Peizerat 1998

  6. #21
    Off the ice Buttercup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Left field
    Posts
    3,407
    Quote Originally Posted by cvg16 View Post
    Wow, I am developing new appreciation for pairs...and falling in love with Gordeeva and Grinkov. Amazing!

    I'm hoping the same happens for ice dance. But I just can't get into it because I don't know what actually to watch for - no throws and jumps. I guess this is the discipline where feet-watching is a must.
    I think pairs is the discipline that was hurt the most by CoP, which is kind of ironic considering it was a pairs event that provided the reason for the change in the judging system. Dance IMO has mostly improved, and it's great that the "wait your turn" thing isn't as bad; in singles, there are some positive changes (spins) and some that aren't as good (upper body movement in step sequences is almost as evil as snooker during GPs). But pairs has gotten very cookie cutter, and while there are some good programs here and there (Robin and Aliona have had some good ones, and M/T had a beautiful SP this past season), it just seems a lot less creative and interesting.

    Has anyone posted G/G's 1988 Olympic performances? Here's the SP. Was everyone skating to Carmen that year? And the LP; the video includes some of the warmup and they start around 2:50.

    I've gotten much more inetersted in dance because there's more room for individuality and creativity. The top teams are usually quite different from each other, and while I don't always agree with the results, it's fun to watch.

    And now, I have to confess to what appears to be the very worst thing a FS fan can feel; worse even than not really thinking Kwan was that great. Maybe because I didn't see it in real time... I never liked T&D's Bolero that much. There, I've said it! Now I will run and hide .
    Last edited by Buttercup; 06-26-2009 at 11:21 AM.

  7. #22
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,102
    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    And now, I have to confess to what appears to be the very worst thing a FS fan can apparently feel...
    No, thinking that Kwan was not really all that great is the worst, and not liking T&D's Bolero that much is only the second worst.

  8. #23
    Off the ice Buttercup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Left field
    Posts
    3,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    No, thinking that Kwan was not really all that great is the worst, and not liking T&D's Bolero that much is only the second worst.
    Hmm... I'll take your word for it, MM!

    I also committed the sin of writing that sentence badly, and you quoted me before I could fix it!

  9. #24
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,580
    oh oh, i also think that their bolero was not that great and even worse than just great , maybe cause i didnt see it in real time also ?But I think Boitano was that great without seeing him in real time either.
    Maybe because i dont like bolero music?
    sorry:o
    for kwan my opinion has not changed in years, she was/is that great
    B where do you hide?can I join?

  10. #25
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    6,889
    It has been said Ravel wrote "Bolero" to prove a point and win a bet. The point was that by using colorful and innovative orchestrational techniques he could take a simple melody and rhythm and repeat it over and over again - and still write a piece that would become a part of the modern symphonic repertoire. Ravel won the bet and next time you listen to Bolero you might consider what he is doing. It is not everyone's favorite music - but it was so innovative in it's time. After the premier performance, legend has it that a woman screamed at Ravel, " you are totally mad!" Ravel replied "you understand the music very well."
    Ravel was one of the greatest orchestrators that ever lived.
    Last edited by janetfan; 06-26-2009 at 12:24 PM.

  11. #26
    L'art pour l'art Medusa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,752
    Quote Originally Posted by janetfan View Post
    It has been said Ravel wrote "Bolero" to prove a point and win a bet.
    Others say that Ravel's neurological condition was in parts responsible for the repetitive nature of the Bolero.

  12. #27
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Medusa View Post
    Others say that Ravel's neurological condition was in parts responsible for the repetitive nature of the Bolero.
    There are many, many stories about Bolero. Ravel also said he never thought it would be played again after the premier. He also had a big fight with Toscanini over the tempos.
    My story about the "bet" is one I learned from my orchestration teacher at music school. I don't believe for a second that his illness had anything to do with the way he wrote the piece. There are more stories about how he came up with the idea for the rhythmic pattern. He also wrote other works after Bolero and they are not limited or similar to Bolero - yet he was still ill.
    But what is important to realize is Ravel never changes the rhythmic pattern, keeps to the same melody with very few modulations and through great orchestrational technique came up with a piece that has become a staple of the repertoire.
    I am from Philly - and "Bolero" has long been one of the most famous works performed by our world renowned orchestra. Scheherazade was another - wonder if our conductors were skating fans (Stokowski, Ormandy, Muti, etc...)
    Last edited by janetfan; 06-26-2009 at 01:01 PM.

  13. #28
    Rinkside
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    8
    I have decided to stop lurking and post, mostly because I am envious that you'll see so many fantastic performances for the first time!
    With the giants like Browning, Yagudin, Lambiel it'll be worth it to watch everything available ( that is, if you like their style)
    Here's a little more:
    Browning SP, Worlds1991 ( "Hindu War God)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyoSJKjZums

    Lighter side of Yagudin- SP Worlds 2000 (" Nutrocker")
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuPCGUbz42c

    Although I usually prefer competitive programs to exhibitions, sometimes exhibitions are amazing revelations.
    Here are some:
    Browning, the first man to land a quad, performs the most amazing Flamenco ("Nyah") - all footwork, no jumps. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT3lfjFiydY

    Lambiel- the most joyful piece of improvisation ever ( he had to change the EX at the last moment due to music repetition)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcGnq2kHd90
    and a very different Stephane - Un Giorno Per Noi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVK4SL91rzI

    Gordeeva/ Grinkov, once they turned pro. Vocalise. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PoRZRVQyLo

  14. #29
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,102
    Thanks for joining us, and welcome, dinakt. Post often, post long!
    Last edited by Mathman; 06-26-2009 at 08:59 PM.

  15. #30
    Rink Rat i love to skate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,477
    This thread caused me to do some YouTube searching and I came across two of my favorite Kurt Browning's exhibition programs that I think are worth viewing:

    1994
    I was lucky enough to see this program live when I was eight. I was amazed by him them and still am now. This program is all about passion, passion, passion. Not to mention an amazing triple axel!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWWb7...eature=related

    1998
    This program is where he landed a quad, ten years after landing the first one. And at the age of 32! Amazing musicality, footwork, and body control. To me this program is a work of art!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Tcy-...eature=related

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •