Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 77

Thread: Jennifer Kirk: Skating's Not-So-Secret Shame

  1. #31
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    134

  2. #32
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by CzarinaAnya View Post
    What's sad is that it's usually not comments from fans that make skaters go too thin. Half the time it comes straight from their coaches.
    True but fans are perfectly guilty too.

    I've seen plenty of comments of 'X skater having the "perfect" body', 'Y skater should be playing basketball instead or skates too manly' (all because of a muscular build), or 'Don't want to be mean but Z skater looks really heavy.' I've seen them one form or another on forums and YouTube comments. For the record, I am quoting (anonymously) posters who have said this, be they ubers or just non-ubers.

    I believe Canada released an article about how the Asian women are successful primarily because of their body frames. Not for nothing, it wasn't very encouraging.

    It's hard to believe that building muscle would hinder a skater's air turns. I'll have to think about that.
    I'd imagine it's different for every skater, which is another thing. Some skating fans need to understand that no two skaters will have exactly the same body frame/type and that their bodies work differently. *gasp* /rant

    Joesitz, Sasha is a good example of someone with muscle that rotates well in the air. Yes, Sasha's body changed dramatically as her career progressed. However, during the Salt Lake City, Sasha was probably the most muscular in her entire skating career. Yet, she had no problem springing into her loop and axels, most notably of her jumps. Her rotation is incredible.

  3. #33
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    20,185
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkestMoon View Post
    Joesitz, Sasha is a good example of someone with muscle that rotates well in the air. Yes, Sasha's body changed dramatically as her career progressed. However, during the Salt Lake City, Sasha was probably the most muscular in her entire skating career. Yet, she had no problem springing into her loop and axels, most notably of her jumps. Her rotation is incredible.
    Thank you, DM. I certainly agree, Sasha has a tight body and a tight body works everything better than a flabby one. As Wilde said, "Youth, it's wasted on the young." Sasha knows better.

  4. #34
    Rinkside
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    23
    Jenny is right about this and it has been going on for a long time. When I was skating, I was naturally thin and weight was not really a problem for me. I didn't pay much attention to it until one summer at skating camp when a couple of the girls spent a lot of time talking about weight, food, calories etc They were far from heavy, but they said they had put on a few pounds during the winter and were unhappy about it.
    One day after a trip to the buffet restaurant in town, I made the mistake of telling one of them that I had eaten too much was not looking forward to my jump lesson. She immediately launched into a graphic lesson in how I should just go throw up my lunch and the sooner the better. She said they had all started doing this and were losing weight. Their parents and coaches were pleased that the weight issue seemed to be under control and they seemed to think they had discovered a brilliant way to have their cake without the calories.
    This was in the early seventies and I had never heard of bullemia but that's what it was.

  5. #35
    Custom Title antmanb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    UK - Manchester
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkestMoon View Post
    I'd imagine it's different for every skater, which is another thing. Some skating fans need to understand that no two skaters will have exactly the same body frame/type and that their bodies work differently. *gasp* /rant
    No skaters don't have exactly the same bodies but they are all extremely similar - especially the men. The only male skaters that break that trend are pairs skaters as they tend to be bigger/bulkier because that helps with the lifts and throws. Most male skaters are more or less the same body wise, there is a reason you don't see 7foot tall 250lb male skaters - they just don't rotate as fast for the jumps.

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkestMoon View Post
    Joesitz, Sasha is a good example of someone with muscle that rotates well in the air. Yes, Sasha's body changed dramatically as her career progressed. However, during the Salt Lake City, Sasha was probably the most muscular in her entire skating career. Yet, she had no problem springing into her loop and axels, most notably of her jumps. Her rotation is incredible.
    I wasn't really thinking about the women when discussing muscle mass - I was referrring specifically to Joubert's comments about his upper body bulking up easily and it throwing off his jumps. Joannie made a similar statement so there has to be something in it if both of these skaters have said the same thing.

    Ant

  6. #36
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    820
    Good for Jenny to come forward with this problem. Maybe it will help others to "wise up."

  7. #37
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by antmanb View Post
    I wasn't really thinking about the women when discussing muscle mass - I was referrring specifically to Joubert's comments about his upper body bulking up easily and it throwing off his jumps. Joannie made a similar statement so there has to be something in it if both of these skaters have said the same thing.
    True. I do agree with you because muscle weight weighs more than actual fat. Sasha's case conflicts with this correlation. Joannie is similar in height with Sasha, though taller by an inch. Sasha having muscle weight doesn't seem to affect her rotation in the air but for Joannie, it is if she adds more than what she already has. Mao and Yuna have similar bodies but Yu-na is more prone to injuries.

  8. #38
    Custom Title McWicked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Harford, Maryland.
    Posts
    294
    For some reason my last post was deleted. So I will just say this is such SAD news

  9. #39
    Mrs. Roman Kostomarov icedancingnut31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    186
    This is sadly all true. I am a skater and I am pressured to lose weight. My coach is my main supporter and NEVER tells me I am fat or that I need to lose weight. She is like my therapist and my best friend and if I have problems in life I go to her.The atmosphere around me does pressure me on my weight. All the girls I skate with are stick thin while i am an average sized person my bmi within normal range. But I sometimes think I really want to lose weight. Skating dress companies really lower myself esteem, their sizes are so tiny and an average sized adult is who normally wears an Adult Small or Medium in most clothes is considered a large or an extra by a skating dress company. My body in the skating world is considered "large" which in skating dress designer language means fat. My family members call me overweight or fat a lot and sometimes I want to quit skating because off all the weight pressures. I don't have an eating disorder but I feel like all the pressure the skating world puts on being skinny may want to induce one. I hate it how normal sized people (not fat, not skinny) are considered fat in this sport. By the way many skaters do have large thighs(including me) thanks to super strong leg muscles
    Last edited by icedancingnut31; 07-07-2009 at 12:17 PM.

  10. #40
    Down With It
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,694
    Quote Originally Posted by icedancingnut31 View Post
    This is sadly all true. I am a skater and I am pressured to lose weight. My coach is my main supporter and NEVER tells me I am fat or that I need to lose weight. She is like my therapist and my best friend and if I have problems in life I go to her.The atmosphere around me does pressure me on my weight. All the girls I skate with are stick thin while i am an average sized person my bmi within normal range. But I sometimes think I really want to lose weight. Skating dress companies really lower myself esteem, their sizes are so tiny and an average sized adult is who normally wears an Adult Small or Medium in most clothes is considered a large or an extra by a skating dress company. My body in the skating world is considered "large" which in skating dress designer language means fat. My family members call me overweight or fat a lot and sometimes I want to quit skating because off all the weight pressures. I don't have an eating disorder but I feel like all the pressure the skating world puts on being skinny may want to induce one. I hate it how normal sized people (not fat, not skinny) are considered fat in this sport. By the way many skaters do have large thighs(including me) thanks to super strong leg muscles

  11. #41
    Rooting for the divas with Kwanford Spun Silver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,880
    This is not fundamentally a skating issue, is it? It's a broad cultural issue. Just about everyone whom people are going to pay money to watch -- actors, models, dancers, athletes, or pop stars -- is expected to be thin unless their performance area (like football or sumo wrestling) actually demands extra muscularity or beefiness.

    Even opera singers (the traditional "fat ladies") are now pressured to be thin - e.g. the recent story of Deborah Voigt who lost a role because she didn't fit into the costume and then had gastric bypass surgery. And even male models, dancers, skaters and actors have to worry about their weight, so it's not just a female issue (even though it's far worse for women -- compare the PR over Jessica Simpson's weight gain over Russell Crowe's).

    There must be some psychological factor in this demand for thinness at a time when the population as a whole is increasingly obese. Or maybe it's economic. We can't be bothered to slim down ourselves so we pay our entertainers to do it for us, just like we hire a cleaning lady to take care of our house. Or perhaps we're projecting our desired selves into those gorgeously thin bodies. Or perhaps watching those almost transparent, "angelic" bodies is a way of experiencing transcendence in a post-religious society.

    Anyway I don't think this will change in skating unless the entire performing-arts aspect of skating disappears and it becomes pure sport. Since I would oppose the switch to pure sport, my recommendation is a big increase in the education of skaters and coaches about healthy nutrition.

    I really don't think censoring skating boards on the topic of weight is an appropriate response, any more than I think skating boards cause eating disorders. I always stand up for courtesy toward skaters, but not at the cost of censoring free speech.

    This board isn't censoring "weight talk" yet, is it? I just mention it because the idea always comes up in the context of eating disorders.

  12. #42
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Staring at the ocean and smiling.
    Posts
    17,136
    I wonder how much of the more recent increase in demand for thinness is due to the fact that so many of our digital TV's need to have the picture stretched horizontally 20% to fill up the screen? I always swap it back to normal with the black edges to watch skating to flatter the skaters, but I don't do it to watch the news, for example, so the people look 20% wider (fatter) than a tube TV picture from back in the day. And that was supposed to add 10 lbs to a person, so the thinness demands are even greater.

  13. #43
    bugs are smarter than we are bronxgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    1,197
    I am proud of Jenny Kirk's bravery in coming forward and writing this article. If it makes just one skater not develop an eating disorder, she will have performed a very good deed, and possibly even saved a life. (And yes, severe eating disorders can kill- anyone remeber the Carpenters? the old singing group?)

  14. #44
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,222
    Sadly, this whole weight issue is not a recent problem at all.

    I wasn't alive when Trixi Schuba and Janet Lynn were competing, but I had read and heard a lot of descriptions (both from the past and more recent ones) about how they differed--there was "nymph-like" Janet, enchanting the audiences with her free skating while Trixi was a superb figure skater who had an advantage because of her "heavy" and "large" frame. I remember feeling very shocked when I watched a high-quality video of both skaters for the first time--I expected Trixi to be much more full-figured but she was a slim, healthy-looking woman who looked a meagre five pounds or so heavier than Janet. The standards people have for figure skaters are often so ridiculous.

  15. #45
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,283
    Quote Originally Posted by soogar View Post
    Less weight is less pressure on the joints- especially with jumping. As a regular person, when I was really heavy I had a lot of problems with my joints. When I lost weight the pain was gone- and returns if I put on pounds.

    Keeping a strict diet during the competitive years is probably the best preventative against injury. A skater can always return to a normal diet after the competitive years, but hip, knee and back injuries can last forever and affect everyday life.
    I understand that it is a very good idea for overweight folks to lose weight to improve a variety of medical conditions, including joint problems such as you describe. However, those of normal and low weight will not experience the same benefts, as weight isn't the cause of their problems.

    I find your second statement to be a bit frightening. Remember that you're talking about kids, for the most part. Kids that are still growing and are putting in huge amounts of physical exercise and therefore need huge amounts of fuel for their bodies. I was a stick-thin, very active kid, and can remember quite clearly sitting down to lunch and eating 12 pancakes with as much syrup as I could get away with — and I didn't put on a pound because I was growing and expending energy. Strict dieting is almost never successful under normal adult circumstances, let alone for kids whose peers are eating burgers and fries. Keeping in shape is, of course, important for virtually any sport, and nutrition is an important part of this. But strict diet? Where they're supposed to feel bad/failure if they deviate and have a chocolate bar or a tub of popcorn at the arena? That's incredibly counterproductive, and simply exacerbates the mental components of eating disorders. Think about it — the message is that if they eat normally, they're fat.

    There's also the issue that, after a certain length of time, not getting enough calories (energy) causes the body to eat itself for fuel. This leads to muscle wasting, wasting of tissues in joints etc, and even problems with internal organs. And of course the heart, being one big muscle, is at terrible risk. So starving oneself does not contribute to prevention of injuries — quite the opposite in fact.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •