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Thread: Top 10 Ladies in Skating History?

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    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Top 10 Ladies in Skating History?

    Here is a list of the Top 10 Lady figure skaters.
    Compiled in 2008 it considers skaters from all eras.

    Did they get it right?

    http://sportales.com/skating/10-grea...s-of-all-time/

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    Desperate Mouse Killer kandidy's Avatar
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    All very well deserved to be called greatest skaters.

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    I think if they updated it now they might put Yu-Na in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by berrycute View Post
    I think if they updated it now they might put Yu-Na in.
    Yuna's Grand Prix record is out of this world. but I think she needs a few more major titles to make the list.

    Obviously Yuna is a better skater than the Ladies from an earlier era but that is because figure skating continues to evolve.

    Certainly Plushy is a better skater than Dick Button just as Michelle could do more than Dorothy or Peggy on the ice.

    I think Yuna needs an Olympic medal and another WC to make the list.

    I think if Yuna wins a few more major titles I would bump Dorothy Hamill off the list and replace her with Yuna. But not yet.

    Winning Grand Prix events is not comparable to winning the OGM or multi WC's.

    And what of Mao? Does she deserve a spot - maybe in place of Chen-Lu?

    I was happy to see Lulu make the list because she was one of my all-time favorite skaters.

    Are medals the most important criteria to make this list?
    In my mind the two most influential Lady skaters were Sonja and then Janet.

    But the list is not about the most innovative skaters but about the greatest.

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    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    I would try to squeeze Madge Syers onto the list. The pioneer of women's figure skating, she set the skating world on its ear by entering the 1902 World Championships. The ISU discovered to its horror that there was no specific rule that women could not compete in this sport! (She won silver behind Ulrich Salchow.)

    The next year the ISU acted quickly to cover up this scandalous state of affairs by forbidding women to skate, relying on the rationale that a woman's ankle-length skirt prevented the judges from seeing the skaters' feet properly. Syers responded by switching to mid-calf skirts.The ISU had no choice but to institute a women's event.

    Sayers won the first two women's world championships (1906 and 1907) and the 1908 Olympic gold medal.

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    Yum, I love top ten lists! Thanks for posting this.

    It almost looks like a list done by an outsider, because it seems to go by medal count. By contrast, I can't imagine any Top 10 list without Janet Lynn, and I think any skating buff would agree, but a general sports expert wouldn't count her because she never won an international gold. I know a lot of people (maybe some of you) who would even put her just a smidge above Peggy Fleming for the quality of her skating. I love both Fleming and Lynn and would have them both on this list. Henie certainly belongs as a pathfinder and a three-time Olympic gold winner. Some might include Barbara Ann Scott as the first North American Olympic gold medalist. Widening the parameters a bit, I'd include Irina Rodnina, also a three-time Olympic gold medalist and arguably the engine of both of the pairs she skated with. Kwan definitely, by every criterion. I'm glad they included Slutskaya instead of Baiul, because I like longevity: a career with persistence gives a better view of both athletic and artistic essence.

    I hope that lists of the future are able to include Mao--in other words, that she recovers and continues to grow. YuNa certainly seems the giant of this era, and she'll probably be in, but only time will tell.

    Isn't it much easier to make a list of men! Ulrich Salchow (first OGM and inventor of the salchow), Gillis Graftstrom (3 OGMs), Button, Curry, Cranston (included because he and Curry really are the two pillars of modern men's interpretive skating), Hamilton, Browning, Yagudin, fill in two more of your choice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    I would try to squeeze Madge Syers onto the list. The pioneer of women's figure skating, she set the skating world on its ear by entering the 1902 World Championships. The ISU discovered to its horror that there was no specific rule that women could not compete in this sport! (She won silver behind Ulrich Salchow.)

    The next year the ISU acted quickly to cover up this scandalous state of affairs by forbidding women to skate, relying on the rationale that a woman's ankle-length skirt prevented the judges from seeing the skaters' feet properly. Syers responded by switching to mid-calf skirts.The ISU had no choice but to institute a women's event.

    Sayers won the first two women's world championships (1906 and 1907) and the 1908 Olympic gold medal.
    Thankyou for such a fascinating post. BTW, where was Madge from?

    Is it possible for you to squeeze in Madge - and if so - who would you bump from the list?

    Informed GS readers want to know


    ETA: Here is the list of the Top 10 Men:

    http://sportales.com/skating/10-grea...s-of-all-time/
    Last edited by janetfan; 11-28-2009 at 09:57 AM.

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    Yu Na is better than most of those ladies....but I guess it's hard to compare because ladies have started doing much harder jumps recently. Also Mao before this season's meltdown could go on their too...I mean she does triple axels

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverlake22 View Post
    Yu Na is better than most of those ladies....but I guess it's hard to compare because ladies have started doing much harder jumps recently. Also Mao before this season's meltdown could go on their too...I mean she does triple axels
    Many think Midori's 3A had better height was better rotation wise - and it was also done back in the late 80's. Midori did not make the list.......

    It is obvious that today's skaters are more tecnically advanced than skaters from previous generations. I don't think that is much of a consideration for this list or Sonja and Peggy, etc would not be on it.

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    Custom Title NatachaHatawa's Avatar
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    Obviously Yu-Na should be in there.

    I'd say the top 3 are Sonja Neie, Katterina Witt and Michelle Kwan.
    People like Peggy Flemming, Dorothy Hamill, Lu Chen and Irina Slutskaya should obviouslt be in there. However, ther being only ten spots, ther was no space for people like Midori Ito. It's always hard to choose a specific number of people.

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    Gaak! The men's list doesn't have Curry on it. That's just ridiculous. I think they put some guys on the list for jumps they either pioneered or advanced--hence Stojko's presence--but Curry really changed men's skating in a fundamental way, and he did win an OGM. I'd put him on there, maybe even instead of Boitano. (No offence meant at all to Boitano or to his fans, of whom I am one.)

    I definitely agree that Madge Syers should be on the list. I'd put her on instead of Herma Szabo.

    Much as I love Chen Lu (and that second Olympic bronze was one of the most satisfying moments in skating history), I think I'd have to agree with the idea of putting Midori Ido instead of Chen. Ito wasn't just a triple axel on blades. She actually was a very musical, emotional skater. Because she didn't have the long limbs and supple torso people often interpret as graceful, it was easy to assume she was merely a powerhouse. She was powerful, of course, but she was also graceful. And she pioneered the triple axel for ladies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Barbara Ann Scott as the first North American Olympic gold medalist.
    ,,, and inspiration for the all-time classic, "Ba-ba-ba, Ba-barbra Ann."

    Isn't it much easier to make a list of men! Ulrich Salchow (first OGM and inventor of the salchow), Gillis Graftstrom (3 OGMs), Button, Curry, Cranston (included because he and Curry really are the two pillars of modern men's interpretive skating), Hamilton, Browning, Yagudin, fill in two more of your choice.
    Seven-time world champion Karl Shafer and Jackson Haines, inventor of the concept of skating to music and performing for an audience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I definitely agree that Madge Syers should be on the list. I'd put her on instead of Herma Szabo.
    Szabo is one of three ladies to win five world championships. The other two are Carol Heiss and Michelle Kwan.
    Last edited by Mathman; 11-28-2009 at 03:59 PM.

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    [QUOTE=Mathman;435411]
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Barbara Ann Scott as the first North American Olympic gold medalist.['quote]

    ,,, and inspiration for the all-time classic, "Ba-ba-ba, Ba-barbra Ann."



    Seven-time world champion Karl Shafer and Jackson Haines, inventor of the concept of skating to music and performing for an audience.



    Szabo is one of three ladies to win five world championships. The other two are Carol Heiss and Michelle Kwan.
    Carol won Olympic Silver in 1956 and later that season her first WC. I don't think she ever lost again and she retired in 1960 with Olympic Gold and her 5th straight WC.
    She won her last four Natls from 1957-60 and twice won Gold at the old bi-annual North American championship.

    What a dominator she was
    Last edited by janetfan; 11-28-2009 at 04:01 PM.

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    Am I the only one to think that Alexei Yagudin is under-rated?

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    Quote Originally Posted by NatachaHatawa View Post
    Am I the only one to think that Alexei Yagudin is under-rated?
    I am sure many think Yagudin belongs in the top five.

    Speaking of underrated skaters, here is 14 year old Janet Lynn from the '68 Olympics.

    If anyone is interested she appears to do a combination jump after 1:42 and the on the second jump she raises her arm over her head.

    Brian Boitano said he used to study tapes of Janet and I wonder if this little 2Flip +1axle with the arm over her head inspired his "Tano" lutz?

    Brian said he used to study her IN and pick up steps/footwork from Janet - but maybe he noticed something else too

    Or maybe I need to stop eating so much turkey and gravy.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jukiK...om=PL&index=49
    Last edited by janetfan; 11-28-2009 at 04:33 PM.

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