This might just be interesting for math geeks, but nere it is nonetheless. Standard deviation is basically how much a set of numbers diverges. This is relevant for FS scores because a small standard deviation means all judges pretty much agree whereas a large deviation means there is no agreement. For example, scores of 7.25,7.5,7.5, 7.75 have standard deviation of 0.2, whereas scores 6.5, 7.25, 7.75, 8.5 have s.d. of 0.84. Mathman, feel free to explain it better

I thought it would be interesting to see standard deviations in the component scores of men free skate. Note that I took a standard deviation for all components and all judges, so I had a set of 40 numbers for each skater (5 components times 8 judges). In general, standard deviation grows as we move down the ranks, that makes sense. What I found interesting, though, was that by far the largest standard deviation of the night went to Plushenko (Lysacek's is among the smallest). Also found it interesting that Weir's deviation wasn't all that big at all (I thought it was a matter of just some judges not liking him - not so).

So, here it is, in order from largest deviation to the smallest; number in parenthesis indicates placement for the free skate.

  1. Plushenko (2) - 0.8953
  2. Ten (14) - 0.8581
  3. Kovalevsky (24) - 0.7530
  4. Pfeifer (20) - 0.7426
  5. Bacchini (22) - 0.7150
  6. Lindemann (23) - 0.6920
  7. Borodulin (12) - 0.6880
  8. Chipeur (21) - 0.6810
  9. Verner (17) - 0.6752
  10. Joubert (16) - 0.6691
  11. van der Perren (18) - 0.6613
  12. Schultheiss (13) - 0.6579
  13. Contesti (19) - 0.6373
  14. Fernandez (10) - 0.5901
  15. Weir (6) - 0.5568
  16. Lambiel (3) - 0.5367
  17. Brezina (11) - 0.5282
  18. Kozuka (8) - 0.5171
  19. Oda (7) - 0.5144
  20. Abbott (9) - 0.5042
  21. Lysacek (1) - 0.4413
  22. Chan (4) - 0.4367
  23. Takahashi (5) - 0.42957
  24. Amodio (15) - 0.4291