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Thread: Do some countries put to much pressure on their skaters?

  1. #1
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    Do some countries put to much pressure on their skaters?

    I think so, it really bothered me when I heard them talking about how Yuna doesn't get any congratulations e-mails when she gets second. I really think some countries turn something so fun and beautiful into stress

  2. #2
    Custom Title heyang's Avatar
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    I felt bad for Mao. She looked so disappointed with her Silver - I think it was a combination of not having the skate that she wanted, in addition to not meeting the expectations of her country.

    I think part of Yu-Na's popularity is because she is multi-talented (I believe she sings.), as well as being the 1st medal contender the country has ever had in figure skating. Korea is still 'dark' in many ways and I think she represents the hope of what the country wants to be in the world, but can't be, as long as they remain divided. Hopefully, democracy will come to the entire country soon. Well, now, at least the pressure of winning is done, but I suspect that her stardom will go to new heights in her country now - definitely a double edged sword. I wonder if she will continue skating after this year or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by heyang View Post
    I felt bad for Mao. She looked so disappointed with her Silver - I think it was a combination of not having the skate that she wanted, in addition to not meeting the expectations of her country.

    I think part of Yu-Na's popularity is because she is multi-talented (I believe she sings.), as well as being the 1st medal contender the country has ever had in figure skating. Korea is still 'dark' in many ways and I think she represents the hope of what the country wants to be in the world, but can't be, as long as they remain divided. Hopefully, democracy will come to the entire country soon. Well, now, at least the pressure of winning is done, but I suspect that her stardom will go to new heights in her country now - definitely a double edged sword. I wonder if she will continue skating after this year or not.
    I agree that Mao performed brilliantly, except for her two mistakes, and her triple axels were just amazing, maybe even better than most of the men. It's a shame that she was disappointed with her silver. I wish she would understand that her accomplishments are amazing, and she should be happy with all that she has achieved, becoming the first woman to land all three triple axels. Japan unintentionally put a lot of pressure on her, but that applies to every skater as well especially Yuna Kim and Joannie Rochette.

    As someone who lives in Korea, Yuna's popularity derives from the fact that she had to endure and overcome the deficient figure skating conditions in Korea. The fact that she workd to hard to accomplish all that she has inspires others. Also, I know that it was not your intention, but I take offense to your statement that Korea is still 'dark' in many ways. How can a nation that has the 11th largest economy in the world and a thriving democracy (first Asian nation to have a peaceful transition of power) still be 'dark?' South Korea is a legitimate democratic country as it has been since 1987 (the fact that the country would host the 1988 Seoul Olympics triggered the democratic movement).

    I agree with your statements about her stratospheric stardom being a double edged sword. I wonder how she will handle all of it...

  4. #4
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    the idea that she has this picture in her mind that all of Korea will disown her if she doesn't continue to get gold and only gold is just heartbreaking.

    nothing is worth that sort of feeling, imo.

    congratulations for both ladies. they both accomplished so much tonight.

  5. #5
    Custom Title Nadia01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyang View Post
    I felt bad for Mao. She looked so disappointed with her Silver - I think it was a combination of not having the skate that she wanted, in addition to not meeting the expectations of her country.

    I think part of Yu-Na's popularity is because she is multi-talented (I believe she sings.), as well as being the 1st medal contender the country has ever had in figure skating. Korea is still 'dark' in many ways and I think she represents the hope of what the country wants to be in the world, but can't be, as long as they remain divided. Hopefully, democracy will come to the entire country soon. Well, now, at least the pressure of winning is done, but I suspect that her stardom will go to new heights in her country now - definitely a double edged sword. I wonder if she will continue skating after this year or not.

    I hope you don't mean what I think you meant. Otherwise it's really insulting to a country that has big successful global corporations such as Samsung and LG. Let's not forget the 11th largest economy in the world and the host of 88 summer Oly & co-host of 02 World Cup.

    A country doesnt' have to be U-S-A to be 'enlightened'.

  6. #6
    can't come down to Earth prettykeys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UM84 View Post
    I think so, it really bothered me when I heard them talking about how Yuna doesn't get any congratulations e-mails when she gets second. I really think some countries turn something so fun and beautiful into stress
    You mean like this?

    [url]http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1004657/index.htm[/url]

    Sure enough the headlines back in Japan read, MIDORI FAILS.

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    USA may be one of the countries. Unintentionally, of course. In an interview of Kwan with SBS filmed when she visited Korea last January, she said that the media pressure to win OGM was huge. In 1998 she thought it was like a matter of life or death.

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    In the the poster is refering to North Korea as "dark", which it is.

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    Custom Title Nadia01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UM84 View Post
    In the the poster is refering to North Korea as "dark", which it is.
    Um.

    Yuna does NOT represent North Korea. So that's just freaking random to say that the poster meant North Korea when talking about Yuna.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nadia01 View Post
    Um.

    Yuna does NOT represent North Korea. So that's just freaking random to say that the poster meant North Korea when talking about Yuna.
    I know she does not represent North Korea, chill out

  11. #11
    Custom Title Nadia01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UM84 View Post
    I know she does not represent North Korea, chill out
    Perhaps it is you who should chill out. I wasn't even addressing you in my earlier comment about the "dark" Korea.

    ETA: It is usually better to stay out when you have no idea what the poster meant and cannot speak for him.
    Last edited by Nadia01; 02-26-2010 at 08:03 AM.

  12. #12
    Always Believed! Sk8n Mama's Avatar
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    Yes, they do. But it's no different to the pressure we're putting on our hockey team here in Canada. If they don't win gold, I think most Canadians will consider it a failure. Obviously, the pressure isn't too big a factor for Yu-Na or she couldn't have skated like that. I hope the Japanese will be kind to Mao. Though I suspect they will feel she was robbed, which will make them go easier on her, since she did the 3axs and didn't win (and they'll have so many Elvis Stojko quotes to back them up )
    Last edited by Sk8n Mama; 02-26-2010 at 09:22 AM.

  13. #13
    Rinkside
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    i think the Mao has the pressure of the past Japanese women skaters who've done really well while Yuna has a clean slate (i.e she's the first prominent figure skater from Korea) so it is more likely that with any medal Korea would be very happy while for Mao the only option is Gold.

  14. #14
    Waiting for on-ice perfection.
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    Mao's pressure was a tad worse because Japan has no gold medals up till now. Both skaters had to skate tethered to their countries expectations and hopes, and it's amazing that they were able to deliver mesmerizing performances in spite of that. Both countries took a gold for granted, putting even greater pressure.

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