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Thread: ISU Where Will Worlds BE (formerly) JAPAN QUAKE FOR WORLDS

  1. #16
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    Oh, I agree. Just the fact that CNN is referencing Chernobyl in any context is enough to set people on the path to hyperbolic fear.

  2. #17
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    Thanks for clarifying. I was for a while a bit nervous that there is a development I am not aware of - or Japanese media do not want to broadcast!

  3. #18
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    American media go into hyperbolic fear-fear-fear mode every time the word "nuclear" is mentioned, and particularly the NY Times.

    The best place to get truthful info on this sort of thing is here:

    http://www.iaea.org/press/

    They update every time they get something new, and are neither industry apologists nor fearmongers. Basically, there is no release of radioactive steam, water or whatever material as yet. The fire in the plant that had a fire is out. People in a 10 km (6.21371 miles) radius from the plant should stay indoors. People within a 3km (1.8641 miles) radius have been evacuated. If this were in the US, at some point people within a 10 km radius would be advised to take their iodine pills, but the iaea isn't saying that yet, which points to the fact that there is as yet, no release of radioactive material into the air. (I live within 5 miles of 2 active, 1 inactive nuclear reactor, and a large number of nuclear subs, so we get this lecture frequently from our town's civil defense group.)

    It is hard to reach the page today-I'm sure people all over the world are hitting on it. So I'll copy the current status here:

    Japan earthquake update (1755 CET)
    11 March 2011

    Announcements, Featured

    Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) that they have ordered the evacuation of residents within a three-kilometre radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and told people within a 10-kilometre radius to remain indoors.

    The Japanese authorities say there has so far been no release of radiation from any of the nuclear power plants affected by today’s earthquake and aftershocks.

    “The IAEA continues to stand ready to provide technical assistance of any kind, should Japan request this,” IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said.

    The IAEA’s IEC continues to liaise with the Japanese authorities, and is in full response mode to monitor the situation closely round the clock.

    Japan Earthquake Update (1245 CET)
    11 March 2011

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    The IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre has received information from Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) that a heightened state of alert has been declared at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. NISA says the plant has been shut down and no release of radiation has been detected.

    Japanese authorities have also reported a fire at the Onagawa nuclear power plant, which has been extinguished. They say Onagawa, Fukushima-Daini and Tokai nuclear power plants were also shut down automatically, and no radiation release has been detected.

    The IAEA received information from its International Seismic Safety Centre that a second earthquake of magnitude 6.5 has struck Japan near the coast of Honshu, near the Tokai plant.

    The IAEA is seeking further details on the situation at Fukushima Daiichi and other nuclear power plants and research reactors, including information on off-site and on-site electrical power supplies, cooling systems and the condition of the reactor buildings. Nuclear fuel requires continued cooling even after a plant is shut down.

    The IAEA is also seeking information on the status of radioactive sources in the country, such as medical and industrial equipment.

    The World Meteorological Organization has informed the IAEA that prevailing winds are blowing eastwards, away from the Japanese coast.

    All IAEA staff in Japan, both in the Tokyo office and in nuclear facilities, are confirmed to be safe.

    Earthquake Hits Japan (0930 CET)
    11 March 2011

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    The IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre received information from the International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) at around 0815 CET this morning about the earthquake of magnitude 8.9 near the east coast of Honshu, Japan.

    The Agency is liaising with the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to confirm further details of the situation. Japanese authorities reported that the four nuclear power plants closest to the quake have been safely shut down.

    The Agency has sent an offer of Good Offices to Japan, should the country request support.

    Current media reports say a tsumani alert has been issued for 50 countries, reaching as far as Central America. The Agency is seeking further information on which countries and nuclear facilities may be affected.

    Please refer to this webpage for future updates from the Incident and Emergency Centre regarding this event.
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 03-11-2011 at 03:22 PM.

  4. #19
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Another IAEA update:

    IAEA Director General Expresses Condolences Following Japan Earthquake (2050 CET)
    11 March 2011

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    “I would like to express my condolences and sympathies to the people of Japan who have suffered from this earthquake and to the Government of Japan,” said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano.

    Japan earthquake update (2030 CET)
    11 March 2011

    Announcements, Featured

    Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) that today’s earthquake and tsunami have cut the supply of off-site power to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. In addition, diesel generators intended to provide back-up electricity to the plant’s cooling system were disabled by tsunami flooding, and efforts to restore the diesel generators are continuing.

    At Fukushima Daiichi, officials have declared a nuclear emergency situation, and at the nearby Fukushima Daini nuclear power plant, officials have declared a heightened alert condition.

    Japanese authorities say there has so far been no release of radiation from any of the nuclear power plants affected by today’s earthquake and aftershocks.

    The IAEA’s IEC continues to liaise with the Japanese authorities, and is in full response mode to monitor the situation closely round the clock.

  5. #20
    Constable , Costume Police colleen o'neill's Avatar
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    I was glued to BBC World late into the night and again this morning. They don't fall into the same hyperbolic mode and do provide pretty accurate info ; pretty much what doris has posted above, if the IAEA site stays swamped.

  6. #21
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    And as to energy disasters that weren't covered in US news, due to the quake & tsunami:

    http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-...es-away-homes/

    A dam broke, washing away homes in Fukushima prefecture and a massive fire broke out in an oil refinery at Iichihara near Tokyo

    Hours after the quake struck with devastating force, TV images showed huge orange balls of flame rolling up into the night sky as fires raged around a petrochemical complex in Sendai.

    A massive fire also engulfed an oil refinery in Iichihara near Tokyo.
    To put this disaster in the scale of things, the earthquake that devastated Haiti was only 7.3 on the Richter scale. This earthquake was 8.9. The aftershocks are worse than most earthquakes-one that just struck Nagao was 6.2 and before that there was another of 6.1 at Morioka.

    Because major earthquakes have major aftershocks, continued damage may occur.
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 03-11-2011 at 03:48 PM.

  7. #22
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    I can't recall when there was an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale which is logarithmic. Each additional point means ten times the energy or amplitude. That was why Doris called Haiti's quake as only 7.3, which unfornately was pretty much cnetred at a city of shabby dwellings. The Japan quake is off land but the major damage is actually caused by the resulting tsunamis. As well, Japan is one of the most densely populated nations on earth. The damages and losses are just tremendous and record breaking.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkateFiguring View Post
    I can't recall when there was an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale which is logarithmic. Each additional point means ten times the energy or amplitude. That was why Doris called Haiti's quake as only 7.3, which unfornately was pretty much cnetred at a city of shabby dwellings. The Japan quake is off land but the major damage is actually caused by the resulting tsunamis. As well, Japan is one of the most densely populated nations on earth. The damages and losses are just tremendous and record breaking.

    This morning, CP24 in Toronto reported that this was the 5th strongest earthquake ever measured.

    And yes, the scale is logarithmic, but the damage sometimes is not exactly in the epicentre, because the shock wave could spread in linear direction of the centre and if it hits on his way a densely populated area, there the damage could be much larger than in the epicentre, if that place is not populated for example. As you just stated, Skatefiguring, the most casualties were caused by the tsunami wave, and not by the quake itself.

  9. #24
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    More iaea updates. I'm staying linked to the alert site and doing a refresh when I walk through the office:

    Japan Earthquake Update (2210 CET)
    11 March 2011

    Announcements, Featured

    Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) that officials are working to restore power to the cooling systems of the Unit 2 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Mobile electricity supplies have arrived at the site.

    Japanese officials have also reported that pressure is increasing inside the Unit 1 reactor’s containment, and the officials have decided to vent the containment to lower the pressure. The controlled release will be filtered to retain radiation within the containment.

    Three reactors at the plant were operating at the time of the earthquake, and the water level in each of the reactor vessels remains above the fuel elements, according to Japanese authorities.

    The IAEA’s IEC continues to liaise with the Japanese authorities, and is in full response mode to monitor the situation closely round the clock.

  10. #25
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    the whole thing is just devastating. I'm on the other side of the water from Japan in the "Ring of Fire" so I know they've had all the same precautions and preparations we have and then some, but still nothing can prepare you for "the big one". Alaska's watching this very closely. We're pretty much next in line for a big one! praying for all of those out there who are going through this scare and their families.

  11. #26
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Ski was stationed in Kodiak just after the last big Alaska earthquake. The town was flattened, nearly everyone was living in trailers, and the phone book was 2 pages long.

    I hope that any other Alaska earthquakes have their epicenters far from Anchorage and the Kenai Peninsula...and Kodiak.

  12. #27
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    Ski was stationed in Kodiak just after the last big Alaska earthquake. The town was flattened, nearly everyone was living in trailers, and the phone book was 2 pages long.

    I hope that any other Alaska earthquakes have their epicenters far from Anchorage and the Kenai Peninsula...and Kodiak.
    we had a pretty large one a few years back that broke up the AL-CAN but thankfully the Epicenter was in the middle of no where so there were no human casualties. But yeah. Not looking forward to another '64 quake. (not that I was here for the first one lol but I've seen the pics and there are still scars all over the Peninsula and Anchorage from it)

  13. #28
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    I posted this in the other thread about the earthquake in Japan too.

    http://www.jiji.com/jc/c?g=spo_30&k=2011031200700

    translation:

    Ottavio Cinquanta held a press conference (in Inzell, Germany) and confirmed that the ISU will discuss with the JSF and make a decision next week, regarding whether to hold the WC in Tokyo or not, siting the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake and the explosion in Fukushima-Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Station as reasons for such consideration.
    He stated that the situation had changed since yesterday as they had received the information about the possible risk related to nuclear radioactivity.

  14. #29
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    The ISU is pretty funny--the vapor in question is a long way from Tokyo.


    Here's a rollup of current updates from the power companies (within the last hour). This should, of course, be taken with a grain of salt, (perhaps not alarmist enough) from the way I would take US media, but they are the ones most in touch with the situation also.

    UPDATE AS OF 9:30 A.M. EST, SATURDAY, MARCH 12:

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company says it has successfully vented the containment of unit 1 at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in northern Japan, according to several industry sources.

    Japan’s chief cabinet secretary Yukio Edano, told a news conference that there was an explosion at Fukushima-Daiichi at 15:36 local time, but he said it has not affected the reactor’s primary system or its containment, the news service NucNet reported this morning.

    Edano said there was hydrogen explosion in the space between the concrete containment and the reactor’s primary system, but the explosion did not damage the containment function or the reactor system, the report said. A portion of the fuel in the reactor was uncovered and TEPCO is using borated seawater to cover the fuel. Radiation measurements at the site boundary of Fukushima Daiichi were measured at 11 millrem per hour, but were reduced to 7 millirem per hour a few hours after the explosion.

    TEPCO also is preparing to vent the containment structures at Fukushima Daiichi 2 and 3, as of Saturday morning.

    Edano said, "We've confirmed that the reactor container was not damaged. The explosion didn't occur inside the reactor container. As such there was no large amount of radiation leakage outside.,"

    The Japanese government expanded the evacuation zone around the facility to 20 kilometers, or about 12 miles.

    Backup diesel generators and backup batteries have arrived at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

    U.S. support to Japan for the nuclear plant events and earthquake includes assistance from the industry and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

    TEPCO also is working to maintain safe condition of Fukushima Daini units 1, 2 and 3, which have lost reactor pressure suppression function.

    The nuclear facilities were damaged in a magnitude 8.9 earthquake on March 11, centered offshore of the Sendai region, which contains the capital Tokyo. Serious secondary effects followed including a significant tsunami, significant aftershocks and a major fire at a fossil fuel installation.

    UPDATE AS OF 8 A.M. EST, SATURDAY, MARCH 12:

    NEI is coordinating with the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) this morning and will provide a further update to the situation in Japan as soon as possible.

    UPDATE AS OF 5 P.M. EST, FRIDAY, MARCH 11:

    Pressure inside the containment of Unit 1 at Fukushima Daiichi reportedly has been increasing over the time that emergency core cooling systems have not been active. TEPCO reported at 2 a.m. local time that pressure had increased beyond plant reference levels, but was within engineered limits. The company said it will reduce the pressure within containment "for those units that cannot confirm certain level of water injection" by the safety systems. "We will endeavor to restore the units and continue monitoring the environment of the site periphery," TEPCO's press release states.

    The Federation of Electric Power Companies in Japan released a statement indicating that “slightly radioactive vapor will be passed through a filtering system and emitted outside via a ventilation stack.” TEPCO “is confident that this controlled release will help maintain the integrity of the reactor containment vessel while having no impact on health or the environment.”
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 03-12-2011 at 11:03 AM.

  15. #30
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    Doris and the rest of you, thanks for the information. I have to hope that a country like Japan, which is so stringent about buildings being constructed to earthquake code, would be at least as demanding in the design of nuclear plants. Even if the threat is exaggerated, it's still unsettling. As several of you pointed out, in a country with that kind of population density, the danger is exponentially greater in almost every location. I've never heard of Sendai, and now I read that it has a population of a million people. Many major cities in the U.S., including San Francisco, Atlanta, Boston, and Baltimore, don't have a million people. One of the saddest pieces of news I've read today is that several commuter trains are simply missing. At least maybe the nuclear outcome will be less catastrophic than we fear.

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