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Thread: Figure Skating and Ballet

  1. #31
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    Katherine Healy had a long ballet career in Europe.

    I'm curious as to what ballet techniques should not be taught to skaters?

  2. #32
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    Thanks a million for all these informative comments on ballet and/or any other dance exercises.

    I hope skaters, espacially young skaters should get to read this thread. Seriously.
    They probably do everyday training without getting aware of their own bodies, I fear. Getting to understand their body mechanics will definately help them to avoid potential injuries in future and to stay healthy, so that they can have longer competitive careers than that of today.

    Not only this, your guys' deep knowledge and opinions on ANY topics, are just amaging! Really. Just reading all your comments are fascinating and very educative for those who is no familiar/professional to that certain area like me. Again thanks!

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Penny View Post
    I'm curious as to what ballet techniques should not be taught to skaters?
    It's not that they shouldn't be taught, but that they don't work well for skating so they shouldn't be emphasized to the point that they become such ingrained habits that the skater does them automatically when they shouldn't.

    E.g., spotting during pirouettes/spins.

    Also, the free leg and free hip position on scratch spins is not the same as on pirouettes.

  4. #34
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    I remember Katherine Healy's ballet teachers disapproved of her involvement with figure skating because they thought it would mess up her ballet technique. So the mapping from ballet skills to skating isn't perfect.

  5. #35
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    I definitely agree that ballet is a great foundation for or complement to skating because of the focus on core and centering. That also makes Pilates a great addition to the skater's training regimen.

    I vaguely remember Kurt Browning talking about training ballet much later in his career and how it was a positive addition. Does anyone recall that? Perhaps it was after he turned pro or when he met his wife. Not sure.

  6. #36
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Yoga is also an awesome addition because THAT also teaches proper breathing technique.

  7. #37
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    I can tell you what doesn't go with figure skating. Jazz dancing!! All those body oppositions you are taught definitely do not help you stay on your edge.

    Stick with ballet for the beautiful lines, core strength, and lovely extensions. Pilates would be good too.

  8. #38
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    conga ,

    Re; Kurt ... it was definitely through meeting his wife , and I think that was around the time he was turning pro.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mskater93 View Post
    Yoga is also an awesome addition because THAT also teaches proper breathing technique.
    Yoga is definitely a love-hate activity for me. I am not very flexible so some of the poses are challenging, but it has definitely helped improve my running, so that's why I love it!

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by conga View Post
    I definitely agree that ballet is a great foundation for or complement to skating because of the focus on core and centering. That also makes Pilates a great addition to the skater's training regimen.

    I vaguely remember Kurt Browning talking about training ballet much later in his career and how it was a positive addition. Does anyone recall that? Perhaps it was after he turned pro or when he met his wife. Not sure.
    I remember his talking about that, too. He had already turned pro by that time, I'm pretty sure. The dance vocabulary he learned showed up especially in a piece like Nyah. I suspect the training also helped prolong his career; even now in his forties, he retains a lot of his earlier skills.

    I echo other posters in thanking the GS people who are knowledgeable in this area for taking the time to explain all this. It's great to have such enlightening information! Little details such as the discrepancy between how spins/pirouettes are done in skating vs. ballet, with no spotting in skating--such fascinating information, and really helpful to know while watching a program.

  11. #41
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. P View Post
    Yoga is definitely a love-hate activity for me. I am not very flexible so some of the poses are challenging, but it has definitely helped improve my running, so that's why I love it!
    I agree with you, there, Mrs. P - total love-hate - but it IS good for skating. It's another thing that develops core strength, flexibility, and breathing

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by brightphoton View Post
    I remember Katherine Healy's ballet teachers disapproved of her involvement with figure skating because they thought it would mess up her ballet technique. So the mapping from ballet skills to skating isn't perfect.
    Yes, Healy's ballet teachers could always tell when she had been skating more because of the changes in the musculature in her legs. Skating develops the leg muscles differently than ballet, and Healy's teachers did not approve. They felt it interfered with what they were trying to accomplish with her ballet training. (Gelsey Kirkland actually wrote a children's book about the problems of horseback riding while in serious ballet training because of the different muscle development, and the idea is similar).

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I remember his talking about that, too. He had already turned pro by that time, I'm pretty sure. The dance vocabulary he learned showed up especially in a piece like Nyah. I suspect the training also helped prolong his career; even now in his forties, he retains a lot of his earlier skills.

    I echo other posters in thanking the GS people who are knowledgeable in this area for taking the time to explain all this. It's great to have such enlightening information! Little details such as the discrepancy between how spins/pirouettes are done in skating vs. ballet, with no spotting in skating--such fascinating information, and really helpful to know while watching a program.
    Indeed.. esp. gkelly (okay I make sure I get it right/spellcheck this time ) whose fs expertise and patience in trying to expand the knowledge of this sport, has helped me (and probably others) to better understand fs. Once again,

    Olympia, I LOVE Kurt's Nyah. Just couldn't take my eyes off his feet.

  14. #44
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    Ballet is great way to lengthen and lean out your body. Also it deals a great amount with musicality and elegance. The strength and flexibility that can be achieved through balletic study can greatly enhance a skater's performance. Look at early Caroline zhang. Gorgeous lines, musicality, and interpretation can hide a lot of technical issues

  15. #45
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    Maybe we should have a thread about Zumba and how it helped Rachel flatt. Lol

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