Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 77

Thread: Songs I Like

  1. #1
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,235

    Songs I Like

    Would you like to share some songs you love with other posters?

    Let me start with mine:
    1. "Smiling Face" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2c3fqClRYc ) (Composer: Li Tai Xiang): Excerpt Lyrics: "Drizzling faint sorrow, wisps of memory, like dreams, like fantasies, like realities"
    2. "Olive Tree" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrjQm...feature=fvwrel)(Composer: Li Tai Xiang): Excerpt Lyrics: "Don't ask me where I'm from. My hometown is far away. Why do I wander in a distant land? For the olive tree of my dream." Note the Dorian mode (also known as Russian minor, a diatonic scale corresponding to the white keys of the piano from "D" to "D") used by the composer to create a "far-away" feel. Dorian = Olive???--an interesting connotation anyway.
    3. "Walking in the rain" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUjPk...eature=related)(Composer: Li Tai Xiang).
    4. "Mistake" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuEQu9QUe4o, Sorry for the poor sound quality that skips notes in many places, but that's the only link I can find)(Composer: Li Tai Xiang): Excerpt Lyrics: "The clip-clop of my horse's hooves is a beautiful mistake. I'm not a homecomer, but a transient."
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-26-2012 at 10:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Now, these are songs I would never have found on my own. Thanks, BC!

    Hmmm. What to give in return?

    This is a song from Portugal called "Os indios de meia praia." I apologize that I have no idea what it means; a friend at the office shared it with me after I found fado music in Carlos Saura's film about fado, the Portuguese national music genre.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aepOA5zSP0E

    Here is a cantata written by Sibelius, a song (I have deduced that laulu is the Finnish word for "song") about Leminkainen, a legendary Finnish character. Again, I don't know the words, though I gather they might be kind of ribald. I love the song for the jaunty, stirring tune.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WQRfqUnNM8

    This is a song by an early music consort called Arpeggiata. I just love the rhythm. Talk about syncopation!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62xfkKkYsCw
    Last edited by Olympia; 04-22-2012 at 09:26 PM.

  3. #3
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,235
    Thanks for the great songs. I could feel the sunshine radiating from those songs.

    Frankly, I failed to detect any mournful tune in the fado ("fate") music you recommended: "Os indios da meia praia" ("Indians of the Middle Beach"). The lighthearted melody, to me, is at odds almost in a comical fashion (like the Dixie Chicks' Goodbye Earl) with the overtly political lyrics that depict the life of the poor who came to the sea town and worked like a slave to make a living. One reason I thought of might explain such "oddity" concerns the intent of the song writer (Zeca Afonso, a left-wing activist)--to have political resonance in the working-class circles. What can be more easily accepted than a simple, lighthearted song that everyone can sing along?

    Speaking of Dixie Chicks, some of their works were really outstanding. The inconsonance between killing a man and the happy tune surely drew my attention. Here are some examples of their songs that I love:
    1. Goodbye Earl (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gw7gNf_9njs)
    2. Not ready to make nice (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pojL_...feature=relmfu)--very beautiful song .

    Also, I have been quite interested in how languages influence the music. Since Finnish always places the primary stress on the first syllable of a word, it is my hypothesis that Finnish songs are less likely than others to start a musical phrase with an upbeat. Sibelius' Laulu Lemminkäiselle kind of confirms my theory or at least does not invalidate it. The only times (with a relatively low frequency) that the song begins a phrase with an upbeat involve such linking words as ja ("and") and nyt ("now").
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-23-2012 at 03:58 PM.

  4. #4
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    BC, you put your finger on one of the things I have found fascinating about fado music. There doesn't seem to be any one rhythm or mood, despite the name. I expected them all to be mournful, sung by women with plangent voices like Edith Piaf. But if you think about it, Portuguese music would be likely to have influences from Brazil and Africa, and I think that explains it. My friend says that many of the fado singers come from college campuses, by the way.

    If you can find the Carlos Saura film, which I think is just called Fados, by all means rent it. It's a delightful view of a little-known but very rich art form. One thing I found fascinating watching the movie, which was mainly a performance picture, not a narrative, is that almost every singer, male or female, performs with eyes lowered and almost closed. I don't know why that is.


    I'll check into the Dixie Chicks. One country song I love is "Rocky Top, Tennessee." It's got interesting melodic progressions and intervals (if I'm calling the note changes by the right name). Here's an early performance, by a very un-glitzy country group, the Osborne Brothers. Listen to that banjo!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_n9prNixjbg

  5. #5
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,235
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Here's an early performance, by a very un-glitzy country group, the Osborne Brothers. Listen to that banjo!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_n9prNixjbg
    Your banjo led me to another song I love: Man Of Constant Sorrow (http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=GDA708XlFIo). I always thought it was composed specifically for the movie "O, Brother, Where Art Thou?", and I was always impressed with the composer's ability to make it sound so old-time till I found out just now after a quick google search that it was indeed an old song, more than a century old. Although some people claim it was written by Dick Burnett (1883–1977), I strongly suspect that the real author probably bore an Irish last name, for I hear in that song a pure pentatonic scale (Gaelic jumped into my mind) as well as the extensive use of ornaments (e.g., slides)--a major distinguishing feature of Gaelic music, which I believe is closely associated with what some linguists called the "Irish falls" (rising pitch movements in the final position of a phrase or sentence). In contrast, Osborne Brothers' Rocky Top used a somewhat "contaminated" pentatonic scale and exhibited a relative lack of ornaments in their voice, a giveaway that it is rather "Americanized" (probably "modernized" is a better word).
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-23-2012 at 03:42 PM.

  6. #6
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    I can't remember whether Judy Collins or Joan Baez used to perform "Maid of Constant Sorrow"; maybe both of them did. (My two vocal touchstones for American folk revival music.) (hunts around a bit)

    Here's Baez, very early in her career. She tends to sing the authentic gender identification, so she sings it as "Man of Constant Sorrow." The notes to this video say that the origins are in dispute. To me it sounds American, but of course most Southeastern American folk music is descended from either Irish or English folk songs. You could go through the music collected by John Jacob Niles and the songs collected in the U.K. by people like Vaughan Williams and find parallels.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQQjBjwe3-s

    And here's Collins doing the song as "Maid of Constant Sorrow," changing the gender and also the state (to Colorado, where she actually grew up, instead of Kentucky).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFGftqJex2c

    I love a lot of English Revival folk music, especially by the group Steeleye Span, who I think did a lot of their own arrangements and adaptations, and used electric instruments. Here's "The Weaver and the Factory Maid," which has everything: Maddy Prior's clarion voice, some story, some dancy music, and a glimpse of the Industrial Revolution and the people who lived through it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Do7ep...eature=related

    Back to Canada. I'm sure you know Stan Rogers. I came upon him after his untimely death, and I just adore him. This guy's lyrics I listen to. How can he make such complex and particular words fit so neatly into rhyme and rhythm? Two of my favorites are both sea songs: "Bluenose" and "The Mary Ellen Carter."

    Bluenose:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vo1IvV6qAWY

    The Mary Ellen Carter (a song of hard-won renewal if ever there was one)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fhop5VuLDIQ


    By the way, the observation you made about the way Finnish tends to stress the first syllable explains for me the very tricky rhythm at the beginning of the Sibelius, which seems to accent the beat I'm not expecting, and then it kind of shifts. Thanks for the extra insight!

  7. #7
    Custom Title Johar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Petoskey, Michigan
    Posts
    1,751
    I don't remember this song when it came out but I heard it in zumba class last month and fell for it's lively beat. I just want to get up and dance when I hear it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpzIJ...eature=related

  8. #8
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Definitely foot-tapping, Johar! I think zumba class must be a lot of fun.

  9. #9
    skating philosopher Mrs. P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    The land of Agent Dale Cooper
    Posts
    8,596
    Ooh music thread! I like all sorts of music, but I have to say I love K-Pop. To be honest, my love for K-Pop started after finding a bunch of videos while looking for Yuna Kim commercials on YouTube a few years back.

    Also it makes AMAZING running music. (It's true)

    Anyway here's a few of my favorites:

    Sistar, "Alone" — I really love the blend of synths and piano licks in this song. Very sensual and I love the dance moves. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XVIFSM1tEQ&ob=av2n

    Brown Eyed Girls "Sixth Sense" — Also sensual and powerful, but in a different way. I love the anarchy theme in the music video. Also can you believe that three of the four members are in their early 30s?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdH1GwyZJuY

    Seugri, "VVIP" — The Alice in Wonderland theme is quite fun. Sort of a Korean-version of Justin Timberlake. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygkhxUItiUM

    The Koxx, "12:00" — Love the electronic sound of this Korean indie rock band. Also love the lead singer sings completely in English. The cinematography int his video is gorgeous! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN8RR9ZYcwA

    4Minute, "Dream Racer" — This is a song where an idol girl group crosses with indie (the song was produced by The Koxx). The Koxx's electronic sound is very apparent here, but yet maintains the girl group sound of 4minute. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U23E9tHo2y0 (Also like the 1980s-style outfits the girls wear in this performance)

    Clazzi, "How We Feel" — More Electronica goodness. And this video is off the hook! http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=TCYOTV92rpE

    Epik High, "Love Love Love" — This group was on the forefront of hip-hop in Korea. Tablo (the skinny one) is actually Korean-Canadian and graduated from Stanford. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=MkzNG0j06l0


    More on other genres later!

  10. #10
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Thanks, Mrs. P. This thread is great, like a world tour of music that most of us would either never know about or never be able to weed through to find the best songs. It's wonderful to realize how much inventive music (and video creation) is out there.

  11. #11
    Custom Title Johar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Petoskey, Michigan
    Posts
    1,751
    Summer Breeze by Seals & Croft
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsW8rXPcnM0


    Right Down the Line by Gerry Rafferty
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSfOB8ANdWU


    Rose's Theme, by James Horner
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moaIzaUfP0Y
    Last edited by Johar; 04-24-2012 at 07:49 AM.

  12. #12
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Staring at the ocean and smiling.
    Posts
    15,964
    I spent quite a while lately listening to music for Yankee polka SD's and previously for folk OD's.

    Many were quite forgettable, but some made me smile enough that I play them for fun when I'm feeling low.

    Loituma's Ieva's Polka (Finnish)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ygdAiDxKfI

    Here's the Bling Polka I think it is Slovenian?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_W80WVrVRDk

    And I like the Dropkick Murphy's crazy mix of punk and celtic

    I ran into them when they created the "End the Curse of Babe" anthem Tessie
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6EIN3EeE78

    Here's Shippin up to Boston
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qxXUTZ31N0

    and The State of Massachusetts
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HTL5...eature=related


    Here's a Ukrainian song, Pidmanula pidvela in modern version by Via Gra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4-vMxa-KvE

    It means you tricked me & you let me down

  13. #13
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,235
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I can't remember whether Judy Collins or Joan Baez used to perform "Maid of Constant Sorrow"...To me it sounds American
    Thanks for pointing out that there are in fact many versions of "Sorrow". The earliest I could find and listen to is Emry Arthur's (1928)(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d70uxe9FCls), which reminds me of Pretty Saro (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6ArylRGWME), an English folk ballad preserved in the Appalachian Mountains. Those early versions, including Collins' and Baez's, indeed sound "American" (I mean a mixture of English, Gaelic and African influences). Strikingly, none of the early versions ends in the tonic major. The Soggy Bottom Boys' version, sung in a minor scale and ended in the tonic, is clearly a recent rearrangement. It reminds me of Pretty Polly (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR6_rz1VfF8&feature=fvst), which is said to have Scottish roots.

    Quote Originally Posted by Johar View Post
    I just want to get up and dance when I hear it.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpzIJ...eature=related
    Indeed, the music tells me it's time for the nightclub. My head bobbing, my arms waving, my hips shaking, my lips smiling...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. P View Post
    I have to say I love K-Pop...
    The Korean Wave is irresistible, so many good stuff in K-pop, which excels in both musical and visual entertainment. What a great list, very enjoyable. Some part of Sistar's "Alone" reminded me of Michael Jackson's music. BTW, I love Summer Breeze as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    Loituma's Ieva's Polka (Finnish)
    What a cute song, tickling, making me smile. A Finnish song, eh? Not surprisingly, it starts with a downbeat--the first syllable of a word, which is always stressed.
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-24-2012 at 05:12 PM.

  14. #14
    skating philosopher Mrs. P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    The land of Agent Dale Cooper
    Posts
    8,596
    Next on the musical world tour Scandinavia!

    The region that bought you the likes of Laura Lepisto, Kiira Korpi and the Heglesson sisters also is a regaion full of beautiful music:

    Jens Lekman, "The Opposite of Hallelujah" — Jens has somewhat of a melancholy voice but it's backed by major-key melodies so somehow it has a happy feel to it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=x4K90J59LQ4

    Also worth checking out Jens Lekman, "A Sweet Summer's Night On Hammer Hill" — Who knew a man of Nordic descent show such SOUL? http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=CN4fPZpV1dU

    Kings of Convenience, "I Rather Dance With You" — A guy with red hair and a track suit dancing with ballerinas — the video alone is worth watching. But the song has a soft folk melody with a cool drum hook. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OczRpuGKTfY&ob=av3e

    The Whitest Boy Alive, "Burning" — And the lead singer of Kings of Convenience (Eelyand Oye) goes from folk rock to a completely awesome electronic sound. Sort of reminds me of Joy Division or New Order. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAWurnyKZUM

    Royksopp, "What Else Is There" — A song with a haunting dark melody and beautiful female vocals. The video is pretty cool too. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADBKdSCbmiM&ob=av2e

  15. #15
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,235
    Like Bulgarian songs?
    Here is one I like: "The Mystery of Bulgarian Voices: Who am I?" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyL8U...feature=relmfu)

    Care for "Chinese" music? Here are some samples of aboriginal music of Northwestern China.
    1. Eastern Iranian: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...Lj4KF0M8#t=49s
    2. Turkic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGAdGlbFMhc

Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •