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Thread: Songs I Like

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I'd also compound your agonizing by adding several of the French composers to the list, like Ernest Chausson. Here is his Concerto for piano, violin, and string quartet. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aR9U6nhP7t4
    Another masterpiece, the best piano sextet ever! That live recording seems a little off-balanced to me. I mean the piano somehow overwhelms the violin in some places. Here is another one, stereo recording, that I enjoy better: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-uwugKe3xU.
    Of course, speaking of French composers, how can we not mention Ernest Chausson's student Claude Debussy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvFH_6DNRCY)? and Mao Asada's performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=327n8Gue9Ic)?
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I'm listening to my favorite part of Rimsky Korsakov's orchestral suite from his opera Le coq d'or.
    And of course, his famous Scheherazade (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17lEx...eature=related) and Michelle Kwan's performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9cLv...eature=related).

    Some more early 20th century (or late 19th century) composers:
    Sergei Rachmaninoff's Concerto No. 2(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecRu6R3qwV4) (Cohen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZQPy...eature=related)
    Giacomo Puccini's Tosca (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_pg-...eature=related) (Kwan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNtCqLJddNQ) and Turandot (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fYvVRLPVcs)(Arakawa: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xzGdVragbo)
    Igor Stravinsky's Firebird (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WsqK1mCGeY) (Rochette: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZqWXBhJXck)

    I wonder why Dvorak's music has not been used for skating yet? His famous New World Symphony (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tkWv...feature=relmfu) is arguably one of the top 10 best symphonies ever written.
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-28-2012 at 04:35 PM.

  2. #47
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    I'm not sure I realized that Debussy was a student of Chausson. He certainly did his teacher proud. Among other things, he did some deliriously lovely chamber music, along with everything else he did. (Speaking of chamber music, let's add Faure to our list.) Thanks for the alternative rendition of the Chausson, and the video of Mao skating to Clair de Lune. Her style is so compatible with French music, isn't it? I always envisioned Michelle skating to French music as well. They both have the lightness and lyricism for it.

    Back to Jewish music...I thought of two composers who drew from Jewish liturgy. One is I think early baroque: Solomone Rossi. His works sound like Monteverdi or Schutz, but if you listen carefully, they're in Hebrew. Iluvtodd, I wonder whether your choir has ever performed any Rossi.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86YhKN19daQ

    More modern is Ernest Bloch. He wrote a ceremonial piece called the Sacred Service (Avodath Hakodesh), for baritone cantor, chorus, and orchestra. Here's one part of it:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1uiUpRn7HY

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I'm not sure I realized that Debussy was a student of Chausson.
    Sorry, not really teacher-student, they were more like patron-guest. I was told that Chausson, who was older and very wealthy, was a patron of Debussy and often invited him to be his house guest.
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Back to Jewish music...I thought of two composers who drew from Jewish liturgy. One is I think early baroque: Solomone Rossi. His works sound like Monteverdi or Schutz, but if you listen carefully, they're in Hebrew. Iluvtodd, I wonder whether your choir has ever performed any Rossi. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86YhKN19daQ
    It reminds me of Thomas Tallis as well (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9Bnq...eature=related).
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-29-2012 at 09:55 AM.

  4. #49
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    I love the idea of Chausson being a patron. He must have loved music so much that he didn't just want to take part in it himself, he wanted all the most promising people to have a chance to take part as well. I know he didn't live long, but he left some beautiful music for the rest of us. Have you ever heard his vocal piece, Poeme de l"Amour et de la Mer? Sublime. That whole bunch of late-Romantic French composers is so tantalizing, even some of the more obscure ones like Vincent D'Indy. His Symphony on a French Mountain Air (I think it's really a piano concerto in structure) is so exhilarating. Hmmm...who could skate to that first movement...(Do I have a one-track mind?)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Y6hDP18WD8

    Another of my favorite French piano concertos is Saint-Saens' Fifth. (Yes, the thought of a skater comes to me with this music also. Well, it would have the virtue of uniqueness, as well as giving many possibilities for tempo changes and emotional shading.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOn8P3ODsCI

  5. #50
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    It's funny that you put Vincent D'Indy and Saint-Saens together--They didn't get along and hated each other. D'Indy, after becoming its president, kicked Saint-Saëns out of Société Nationale de Musique, a society founded by Saint-Saëns himself to promote French music.
    Saint-Saëns' piano concertos are very exciting to play, very dramatic. His fast and rhythmic sections always make me feel like jumping off the piano stool. And the sad sections, if you play them really slow and pay attention to each note, are the saddest music--crying deep sorrow. He grew up without a father. Both his children died in the same year, and he literally abandoned his wife. He was outspoken and had many enemies. I guess his life was a drama in itself. Besides music, he was also an accomplished scientist in various field. I think he must be a genius, with an exceptionally high IQ. He was of Jewish descent. I don't know if that played any role in the animosity between him and D'Indy, who was anti-Semitic.

    Speaking of analyzing each note, Chopin's piano concertos are simply poems. I don't know how to describe it. The best I can say is that every note is so beautifully arranged--so beautiful.

    Do you remember Mathman once mentioned the judging scandal in 1980 International Frederic Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw? This is Chopin Piano Concerto No. 2 performed by Dang Thai Son, the winner of that event (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...GCE4s5s#t=196s) . And this is performed by Ivo Pogorelic, who caused the controversy due to his "openly provocative style of interpretation and behavior on the stage" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...ZJiUhZE#t=140s). What do you think? If I were a judge, I would have been in the group of judges that found Pogorelic's playing unacceptable. "An immense talent gone tragically astray"--I kind of agree with that.
    Last edited by skatinginbc; 04-29-2012 at 09:23 PM.

  6. #51
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    Olympia, I am familiar with Salomone Rossi & Ernest Bloch! My choir hasn't sung either in the context of a synagogue service, but I did get to sing Rossi's "Barechu" in a Jewish music course that I took @ Gratz College (a college in the Phila. area for Judaica studies). One of my favorite Judaica music CDs is a Judeo/Baroque one that includes Rossi's "Barechu." I was thrilled to find it, as I have always loved it since I was introduced to it in that course. I love Baroque music in general, anyway!

  7. #52
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    I'm so jealous (in the nicest possible way) of you two, who have sung or played such wonderful music. I just looked up "Barechu." BC, you have to listen to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lz7c9f_TjKU

    I also love Baroque music, especially early Baroque like Schutz, Monteverdi, and Gabrielli.

    No kidding, there's a college named for the Gratz family? It makes sense, because wasn't Rebecca from Philadelphia? That's such a wonderful story, how Scott heard of Rebecca from Washington Irving and may have been inspired by her as he created Rebecca of York in Ivanhoe. Yes, I am a romantic.

    BC (you lucky duck, playing Saint-Saens), I think I read somewhere that Saint-Saens was equal parts unpleasant and brilliant--probably in my favorite book about music, Harold C. Schonberg's Lives of the Great Composers. I have a vague memory of Schonberg's recounting an incident where Saint-Saens as a boy played by sight a piano transcription of something amazingly complicated like Tristan und Isolde? It's interesting that he and Faure, two of the longest-lived great composers, pretty much coincided in terms of lifespan, living from the early 1800s into the 1920s. I think Schonberg pointed out that one of them met Rossini in his youth and Gershwin in his old age. Wow. I don't remember reading anything about D'Indy, but I'll go back and check. Phooey on him if he allowed anti-Semitism to color his actions like that. I'll still love Symphony on a French Mountain Air, I suppose, seeing as how I do love large swaths of Wagner. Many artists create works that are bigger and warmer than they are as people. As Geoffrey Rush's character says in Shakespeare in Love, "it's a mystery."

    I remember Math talking about the judging scandal. I'll check out your two tapes and compare.
    Last edited by Olympia; 04-30-2012 at 07:01 AM.

  8. #53
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    Yes, Olympia, Gratz College is named for the Gratz family, a prominent Jewish family back in the day. Rebecca Gratz was part of that family, and she did many wonderful things in her lifetime - starting the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society for needy Jewish women and the first Jewish Sunday School in America - The Hebrew Sunday School Society (back in 1838).

    I love Saint Saens music. One of the pieces I really enjoy is the music that was used in the soundtrack for "Babe," with lyrics ("If I had Words"). This is coming from a soundtrack "nut!"

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by iluvtodd View Post
    Yes, Olympia, Gratz College is named for the Gratz family, a prominent Jewish family back in the day. Rebecca Gratz was part of that family, and she did many wonderful things in her lifetime - starting the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society for needy Jewish women and the first Jewish Sunday School in America - The Hebrew Sunday School Society (back in 1838).

    I love Saint Saens music. One of the pieces I really enjoy is the music that was used in the soundtrack for "Babe," with lyrics ("If I had Words"). This is coming from a soundtrack "nut!"
    I just looked up the Babe song on YouTube. It's the melody from the last movement of his third symphony, the "Organ Symphony." That's the part played by the organ. I agree, it's a wonderful stirring tune...even when sung by mice! I have to mention another piece that Saint-Saens actually planned words to when he wrote it, the lovely aria from his opera Samson and Delilah. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwynxOAoKjo

    In French, it's "Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix," literally "My heart opens at thy voice," but I think it's usually called "My heart at thy sweet voice" in English. It's one of the tenderest songs in opera, though of course the woman was lying through her teeth at the time. The vile seductress.

    Remember that great program Rochette skated to Samson and Delilah? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB2N7aDEN9M

  10. #55
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    For that matter, D&W skated to Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S65MXD3XHvQ


    It's just very good music to skate to.

  11. #56
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    It sure is, Doris!

    There's a lot of lovely stuff in French opera. Here are two duets, both coincidentally same-gender duets (soprano/mezzo, and tenor/bass), and both are set exotically: India and Ceylon, respectively, I think. One is the Flower Song from Leo Delibes' opera Lakme. The other is "Au Fond du Temple Saint" from Georges Bizet's The Pearl Fishers. Don't know if they are skiable by an ice dance duo, but as an exhibition piece for a singles skater or for an ensemble in a pro ice show, some inventive skating could be designed around them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vf42IP__ipw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tLrPVkfCIQ
    Last edited by Olympia; 04-30-2012 at 12:39 PM.

  12. #57
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Here's a bunch of songs that I used to love to blast on the car stereo during my commute. They all take me on a trip to different times in my life.

    Paul Simon
    Late in the Evening
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57RIlznOpDM

    Al Stewart
    Time Passages
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLJGIcWA8Ck

    Chicago
    If you Leave Me now
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlKaV...eature=related

    Dire Straits
    Money for Nothing
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwDDswGsJ60

    Dire Straits
    Sultans of Swing
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xo-J1...eature=related

    Mamas & the Papas
    California Dreamin'
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0UcQDUR-fU

    Simon & Garfunkel
    The Sound of Silence
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqGP6...eature=related

    Janis Joplin
    Piece of My Heart
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mzy_BEzlHWI
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 05-01-2012 at 01:29 AM.

  13. #58
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    That's a great road map, Doris. I'd put a certain amount of Paul Simon in mine as well.

  14. #59
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    Ah, Al Stewart's Time Passages! it, along with Song on the Radio!

    Olympia, I have the Saint Saens' Organ Symphony (at least part of it, if not all of it) on a CD. It's glorious!
    Last edited by iluvtodd; 05-01-2012 at 04:32 AM.

  15. #60
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    Isn't it wonderful? I love that first movement, so intense, with such--well, movement! It almost speeds up my heartbeat as I listen to it. Funny; I don't really know anything about the other two symphonies. The third one seems to get all the spotlight. And it can't be easy to perform, just logistically: they have to lug an organ into the performance space.

    Is anyone else here a fan of the singer-songwriters of the 1970s?

    Jim Croce: I Got a Name
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcqauC49Xmc

    Dan Fogelberg Leader of the Band
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsocZrEcp0Y

    Fogelberg again: Longer Than
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Go6I...eature=related

    Oh, heck, we have to have at least one John Denver. This is Calypso, in honor of Earth Day last week
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35x_rwyBh-8

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