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Thread: OMG! Very close call!

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  1. #1
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    OMG! Very close call!

    I was up in the air halfway through a salchow when out of the corner of my eye I caught this little girl about 7 or 8yo go sliding down on the ice right under me! I put my feet together and came down on both feet up on my toes.

    This kid was literally touching the bottoms of my blades! One extra second and she would have been toast. It's horrifying to think what would have happened to her if I hadn't seen her while up in the air. A blade through the face, a punctured femoral artery, a blade in the skull and brain damage, broken bones from me landing on top of her... thank God I saw her!

    And even after that near death experience, the kid still did not watch where she was going.
    Last edited by treesprite; 05-11-2012 at 08:11 PM.

  2. #2
    Tripping on the Podium
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    I'm guessing this was on a public session and the child was not supervised?

  3. #3
    Tripping on the Podium
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    It truly is amazing, and sad. In my lessons (half of them are in a public skate session) the other coaches seem to care less about whether their students are invading my space or not. What is important to them is THEIR student. Forget about the 40 year old man learning how to skate. These girls have shows to perform. They're not stopping, and they ain't looking. It's a shame that so few rinks exist now compared to yesteryear, and ice is so expensive for 1-3 people to share.

  4. #4
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Many coaches have lost the idea of teaching common courtesy. One of the two rinks that are 10 minutes apart has a sheet down right now and the other rink is SUPER full on the 2p-5p FS sessions (25-30 skaters) of various levels (barely able to stand up to 3+3's) and it's really hairy. This is why I like my early AM ice time...

  5. #5
    Custom Title macy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mskater93 View Post
    Many coaches have lost the idea of teaching common courtesy. One of the two rinks that are 10 minutes apart has a sheet down right now and the other rink is SUPER full on the 2p-5p FS sessions (25-30 skaters) of various levels (barely able to stand up to 3+3's) and it's really hairy. This is why I like my early AM ice time...
    some of the coaches at my rink are the same...they do not teach their students common courtesy and to be respectful to others when they are in their programs. they will literally run you over.

  6. #6
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    I like when the kid who's going to "run you over" is less than 1/2 your size. One day, I will land on one and squash them.

  7. #7
    On the Ice tietzd83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thevaliantx View Post
    Forget about the 40 year old man learning how to skate.
    Ouch... that would be me....

    The club that I have just joined has contract ice for use by only those who have passed Basic 4, and have strict rules on who can be doing what and where. They also stress to parents and skaters proper ice etiquette. I wonder if part of the problem is that people are unaware of such guidelines- especially in an open skate situation.

    Still, as a 40 something year old man learning to skate, I am handing over a decent sum of money for every lesson I take and deserve my practice time on the ice. Although I may not be skating shows, I do intend to compete in USFSA adult events down the road. Since I am currently barred from the contracted ice sessions, open skate is all that is left for me to practice. Luckily I skate in a small town and the open skate sessions are usually not well attended.

  8. #8
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Basic 4 is the minimum for contract ice? Very generous of the club to extend that far down. Typically it's FS1 and up because they can/should be able to move out of the way of skaters in program/lessons while working on their things. Below the basic FS levels, it's typically VERY miss (very little hit) in skaters' abilities to recognize patterns (jump set ups, programs, dances) and move with the flow of traffic. Sorry, but YOU would be a danger to others on contract ice and consequently to yourself until you can get further along than forward and backward swizzles and one foot glides for the reasons mentioned above. I know I am WAY more cautious on FS sessions populated by Prepre and Adult Prebronze and Bronze FS skaters than I am on sessions populated by Intermediate/Novice/Junior/Senior FS because I am less likely to suddenly be bearing down on someone for a jump who is either completely oblivous our can't get out of the way or can't recognize where I am headed. I am not saying I am a jerk on FS sessions (far far from the case), I just need to get my practice in and there's plenty of room out there for everyone, but when you expect someone to vacate an area during the time you are setting up from the other end of the rink and they're still there, it gets frustrating. I get "yelled" at for aborting more things on sessions populated by lower level skaters because they tend to be more oblivous (adults too) and don't recognize where another skater is/is going.

  9. #9
    On the Ice tietzd83's Avatar
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    I see your point. I can understand how my ignorance can cause all kinds of trouble and certainly do not want to be a danger or detract from other's learning. The problem I have is that between contract figure skating and hockey there is little opportunities for adults like me to get time to practice. The open skate sessions around here are almost exclusively during the day when the majority of adults are at work. Okay, that leaves weekends right? Well, I consider myself to be highly motivated and need more than 90 minutes a week to practice. As a flight instructor, once I solo a pilot I expect them to go out on their own and practice. It is cheaper for them, wastes less time, and much easier on my patience because they will hopefully have improved by the next time I fly with them. If we had to wait until all the big jets were safely on the ground before letting them venture out, there would very few newly minted pilots in the world. Just like the 40 year old want-to-be pilot that walks through the door with a goal to reach- more than likely NOT one of becoming a commercial pilot, there is me on the ice. I have a goal I want achieve and am willing to fork out a fairly decent sum of money to do it. This is money being spent in the local skating club, ice rink, and pro shop. Money being used to further promote the sport! I should not be made to feel like I am not important or have a place on the ice because of my age. Everyone had to start somewhere. Do I wish I would have started as a kid?? Certainly! But I am just as, if not more, excited and determined to succeed to the highest level possible as anyone else. To accomplish this, however, I need my fair share of practice time. Maybe I am wrong, but I think the USFSA has embraced the importance of adult skaters and has proven it through the development of its adult programs and competition.

    Forgive me if I sound confrontational and/or a bit "stand-offish," but I was really disheartened by the forget the 40 year old comment...

    Dave

  10. #10
    On the Ice
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    I really disagree with most of the comments about where certain levels should be. I'm an adult pre-bronze skater and I skate almost always with the few elite teenagers. It was agreed between me, my coach, and the skating director that I am more of a danger to the higher level kids than I am to the elite teens. I outweigh the kids by about 150pounds. It is not a pretty sight to see me collide with a 9 year old because she is so short that when I look over my shoulder she is in my blind spot. A parent threw a fit because I was on the ice with smaller kids. I am more comfortable being on the ice with people my size. I know when I see one of them flying down the ice I better get to the boards and fast.

  11. #11
    4th Time Around
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    I am a CW skater and I am 100% aware at all times that the other skaters probably think I'm about to jump when I'm about to spin. I think the people who see me a lot do a better job of sharing space with me than the skaters who aren't used to me. One of the first things I do when someone I don't recognize shows up is to observe the person's habits before trying to negotiate space simply by way of movement.

    The other day I was overjoyed when I heard an instructor tell her child student who was skating backwards around the center circle, to watch where she was going so she wouldn't run into the lady. That was the first time ever that I heard an instructor telling a student to watch behind them. I felt like going after her lesson was over and thanking her, but she left when I wasn't paying attention.

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