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Thread: OMG! Very close call!

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by treesprite View Post
    It was a public session, but one in which 4 or 5 private freestyle lessons were going on. This girl was not in a lesson or anything. I don't know what she was even doing in the middle of the ice because in the couple times I've seen her, she has not done any jumping or spinning. I'm thinking maybe she was trying to do a shoot-the-duck, which has no business being through the center of the ice where people are doing freestyle and lessons.

    A big problem is that skaters who are not doing freestyle, most especially kids who are beginners, like to use the center circle to practice crossovers even though there are 4 circles at the ends (2 on each end), or the center lines just to do edges along, or work on 3 turns which they could do on the ends of the rink like most other people. I hate it when people do crossovers around the middle circle; they refuse to stray off the path of the circle even if it means having a run-in with someone spinning or jumping.
    I'm guilty of using the center circle for crossovers. The thing is that for a beginner skater the ice near the walls and at the ends of the rink can be in REALLY bad shape (at least that's the case at the rinks I go to), and those side circles are somewhat close to the wall, so a beginner skater might be afraid of losing control and hitting the wall. Now, I've also seen more experienced skaters refusing to alter the path of their movements, completely ignoring the fact that there might be folks taking lessons. Some of those skaters have an air of "I'm better than you, I own the ice!!!". Even my coach alluded to this fact. I told my coach that I'm just going to start sticking out my elbows around those skaters who intentionally cut in front of me.

  2. #17
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    Our end circles aren't close enough to run into the walls.

    I'm kind of torn about lessons in public sessions when it comes to right-of-way. Skaters who aren't taking lessons pay just as much to use the ice as those who are, and there is no public session rule that says right of way has to be given to lesson takers. However, there is a public session rule that the center ice is for freestyle skating, and there are cones set up to remind non-freestyle skaters to stay out of the area. I try to give the lessons right-of-way, but I feel like I have every right to not give it if I want to be a #$*&
    Last edited by treesprite; 06-17-2012 at 12:26 AM.

  3. #18
    Rinkside
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    It's really scary the other way around. There's this girl at my rink, and she jumps really high. She was doing a salchow and I was literally under her. It was frightening but I managed to get out of the way.

  4. #19
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    I'm glad you didn't get landed on!

    To be fair, I will say that it's no better (or possibly worse) when a freestyle skater goes into a crowded public session and springs up into a jump right in the main skating lane where there are people having to dodge out of the way. It can seem scary to those having to do the dodging.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by treesprite View Post
    Our end circles aren't close enough to run into the walls.

    I'm kind of torn about lessons in public sessions when it comes to right-of-way. Skaters who aren't taking lessons pay just as much to use the ice as those who are, and there is no public session rule that says right of way has to be given to lesson takers. However, there is a public session rule that the center ice is for freestyle skating, and there are cones set up to remind non-freestyle skaters to stay out of the area. I try to give the lessons right-of-way, but I feel like I have every right to not give it if I want to be a #$*&
    I wish the rinks in my area still had this rule, but they no longer abide by it. The monitors just skate around, and make sure kids aren't sitting on the boards. There are some sessions where we have people who can barely stand, the fast figure skaters, and the dodge-and-weave hockey players. It gets...scary.

  6. #21
    Custom Title Kitt's Avatar
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    It does get scary when hockey people are on the ice. One time a hockey player plowed right into me and then tried to break my fall by picking me up! haha now that I think of it, it's funny, but it wasn't at the time!

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by thevaliantx View Post
    Forget about the 40 year old man learning how to skate.
    Ouch... that would be me....

    The club that I have just joined has contract ice for use by only those who have passed Basic 4, and have strict rules on who can be doing what and where. They also stress to parents and skaters proper ice etiquette. I wonder if part of the problem is that people are unaware of such guidelines- especially in an open skate situation.

    Still, as a 40 something year old man learning to skate, I am handing over a decent sum of money for every lesson I take and deserve my practice time on the ice. Although I may not be skating shows, I do intend to compete in USFSA adult events down the road. Since I am currently barred from the contracted ice sessions, open skate is all that is left for me to practice. Luckily I skate in a small town and the open skate sessions are usually not well attended.

  8. #23
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Basic 4 is the minimum for contract ice? Very generous of the club to extend that far down. Typically it's FS1 and up because they can/should be able to move out of the way of skaters in program/lessons while working on their things. Below the basic FS levels, it's typically VERY miss (very little hit) in skaters' abilities to recognize patterns (jump set ups, programs, dances) and move with the flow of traffic. Sorry, but YOU would be a danger to others on contract ice and consequently to yourself until you can get further along than forward and backward swizzles and one foot glides for the reasons mentioned above. I know I am WAY more cautious on FS sessions populated by Prepre and Adult Prebronze and Bronze FS skaters than I am on sessions populated by Intermediate/Novice/Junior/Senior FS because I am less likely to suddenly be bearing down on someone for a jump who is either completely oblivous our can't get out of the way or can't recognize where I am headed. I am not saying I am a jerk on FS sessions (far far from the case), I just need to get my practice in and there's plenty of room out there for everyone, but when you expect someone to vacate an area during the time you are setting up from the other end of the rink and they're still there, it gets frustrating. I get "yelled" at for aborting more things on sessions populated by lower level skaters because they tend to be more oblivous (adults too) and don't recognize where another skater is/is going.

  9. #24
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    I see your point. I can understand how my ignorance can cause all kinds of trouble and certainly do not want to be a danger or detract from other's learning. The problem I have is that between contract figure skating and hockey there is little opportunities for adults like me to get time to practice. The open skate sessions around here are almost exclusively during the day when the majority of adults are at work. Okay, that leaves weekends right? Well, I consider myself to be highly motivated and need more than 90 minutes a week to practice. As a flight instructor, once I solo a pilot I expect them to go out on their own and practice. It is cheaper for them, wastes less time, and much easier on my patience because they will hopefully have improved by the next time I fly with them. If we had to wait until all the big jets were safely on the ground before letting them venture out, there would very few newly minted pilots in the world. Just like the 40 year old want-to-be pilot that walks through the door with a goal to reach- more than likely NOT one of becoming a commercial pilot, there is me on the ice. I have a goal I want achieve and am willing to fork out a fairly decent sum of money to do it. This is money being spent in the local skating club, ice rink, and pro shop. Money being used to further promote the sport! I should not be made to feel like I am not important or have a place on the ice because of my age. Everyone had to start somewhere. Do I wish I would have started as a kid?? Certainly! But I am just as, if not more, excited and determined to succeed to the highest level possible as anyone else. To accomplish this, however, I need my fair share of practice time. Maybe I am wrong, but I think the USFSA has embraced the importance of adult skaters and has proven it through the development of its adult programs and competition.

    Forgive me if I sound confrontational and/or a bit "stand-offish," but I was really disheartened by the forget the 40 year old comment...

    Dave

  10. #25
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    I object to the age comment as well. There are plenty of older skaters who still maintain higher skill levels and belong on freestyle sessions, not public sessions.

    It's beginners who don't belong on freestyle sessions. The skater needs to have enough skill to be able to get out of the way when necessary and enough awareness of surroundings to know when it's necessary. Adults are probably more aware than kids of the same skill level and in most cases are used to predicting and avoiding traffic while driving, which is a skill that translates to the ice as well even though the traffic patterns, all the specifics really, are different.

    And it is necessary understand the need for that awareness and not to get so focused on one's own practice as to look down at the ice all the time and not pay attention to the other skaters.

    Still, at the very least, a skater who can't yet do forward crossovers or skate backward at all does not belong on a freestyle session unattended. Many rinks allow beginners on freestyle sessions with a coach for lessons at lower levels than for unsupervised practice. If you're taking private lessons, you might see if you can schedule those for the contract sessions that you're not ready to skate on alone yet and save the practices on your own for the public/open sessions.

    Are the contracts with the rink directly or through a skating club?

  11. #26
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    I think valiant was referencing himself on the 40 year old beginner comment, not taking a jab at anyone or trying to make an age-related comment (meaning, pay no mind to the 40 year old (himself) learning how to skate). I made no age reference - I am typically more cautious on sessions populated with Prepre, Prebronze, and Bronze skaters (no matter if they age) because they tend to be less aware and/or less able to flow with traffic/understand patterns than high level skaters. I prefer sessions populated with higher level skaters but I am also a full grown adult working on Novice Moves and Intermediate FS.

    My point was also beginners don't belong on a FS as it's dangerous for everyone (it also depends on the coach, but I think there are some beginners in a lesson that STILL don't really belong on a FS session when that is allowed because there are basic level coaches who are rude/clueless/lack awareness as well as their basic skater - then there becomes two obstacles to avoid instead of one).

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    I object to the age comment as well. There are plenty of older skaters who still maintain higher skill levels and belong on freestyle sessions, not public sessions.
    Well I don't disagree with that at all, I think the point was that any "beginner" level skater at any age doesn't belong on freestyle ice - it's dangerous. You can't mix skaters learning crossovers with skaters doing doubles and triples... and it's not the high level skaters that create the risk, it's the low level skaters who don't know how to yield (because they don't know the patterns or jump set ups) or just generally freak out when they see a skater coming at them quickly.

    I skate on an "adult" session which is technically a public session and consists of some beginning adults, low to mid level freestylers, some dancers, a few hockey skaters, and there is sometimes a guy working on his senior moves... the guy working on his senior isn't truly a danger to the rest of the skaters (he is more than capable of altering patterns as needed, always watches where he is going), but the rest of the lower level skaters who "freak out" because he's skating fast towards them become a huge risk to him and others skaters - because they aren't predictable in how they try to move away at all (if they'd just stop and stay where they are or keep doing what they were doing it would be fine). I've watched countless near collisions that didn't directly involve him, but someone reacting him him (needlessly) and I sometimes want to yell at the other skaters to just chill out.

  13. #28
    On the Ice tietzd83's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=mskater93;652471]I think valiant was referencing himself on the 40 year old beginner comment, not taking a jab at anyone or trying to make an age-related comment (meaning, pay no mind to the 40 year old (himself) learning how to skate).

    I apologize for my misinterpretation and my obvious naiveté on the subject. I guess I am just hypersensitive because I feel so out of place whenever I step out on the ice. It's just a shame that there aren’t more hours in a day or more ice to be had so everyone can get some quality practice time.

    If anything, this conversation has encouraged me to get through the basic stages as efficiently as possible.

  14. #29
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    My comment was a skater learning swizzles and one foot glides does not belong on a FS session and is a danger and that a club that drops the requirement all the way down to B4 is VERY generous in their allowance for FS sessions.

    Sarah - I agree and I initially mentioned Prepre, Prebronze, and Bronze in my comment that I (personally) am more cautious sharing sessions with. Yes, I bumped the adult level up "higher" than the standard track level, but, in my experience, an Adult Bronze typically has the same awareness level and ability to recognize patterns and go with the flow as a competitive Prepre skater (and I've had more of the freak out/near collisions with closer to test level older Bronze skaters than with competitive Prepre skaters). One of my major issues is that I jump and spin CW which seems to confuse less experienced skaters (especially ones who like to set up camp in a spot).

  15. #30
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    It depends, though. I'm a bronze-level skater who was Preliminary as a teenager and who has 20+ years of experience skating on freestyle sessions as a kid as well as an adult.

    Suppose you have a chubby 5'3" skater who has passed the pre-pre FS and prelim moves tests (as well as prelim figures) and is working on prejuvenile (and/or adult silver) moves and preliminary FS. That's my skill level. I daresay I have better awareness and comparable speed at 51 to a skater of similar ability who is 15.

    Other bronze-level skaters -- especially skaters who have not actually passed any of the bronze tests but are currently working on them -- who started as adults may be more cautious and slower. And others in my age group might be fitter and faster even if they started more recently. In either case they would probably be less experienced in anticipating traffic patterns. But probably more aware than a 7-year-old with similar skills.

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