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Thread: Advice on Axel jumps

  1. #16
    Rinkside
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by leafygreens View Post
    I do not mean to be negative, it's just a very very hard jump to do and it's normal to be scared and struggle with it. I think most people do.
    I have to say, that I personally disagree with this. Axel is quite a simple jump, you just need to understand the basic movements required to do it. You need to make sure that you are jumping on the circle you have created going into it. Imagine a large circle, you are gliding on the RBO before you step forward, when you step forward you should not be stepping inside or outside of the circle, but rather on the same arc going into it. A good way to see if you are making this mistake is to glide on the RBO, step to the LFO like you are going to jump, but just glide. You can note your direction and see if you are stepping in the correct line. Let me know if this doesn't make sense, I can draw out a little diagram. Another huge thing is to make sure that you aren't killing the ice with your toepick right before you step; this can throw your weight off SO much, thus making it hard to rotate.

    A lot of people are saying to do Waltz jumps to get used to the feeling; I personally am terrified of them... For me, it feels like jumping off a cliff, where my axel has a lot more 'up" motion. Maybe this is just me.

  2. #17
    4th Time Around
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    Doing waltz jumps isn't going to help much unless you do them a different way than most people seem to do them. When I do a waltz jump to do a waltz jump, I go more for distance and extension. For the 1/2 rotation jump to gear up for axel work, I focus on jumping upwards and keeping my leg close instead of extended. The continuation of the rotation will happen automatically if the limbs are pulled in. Read about the Lussi method for learning jumps (one of our rink's coaches is Nancy Lussi).

  3. #18
    Banned
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    Jan 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by treesprite View Post
    Doing waltz jumps isn't going to help much unless you do them a different way than most people seem to do them. When I do a waltz jump to do a waltz jump, I go more for distance and extension. For the 1/2 rotation jump to gear up for axel work, I focus on jumping upwards and keeping my leg close instead of extended. The continuation of the rotation will happen automatically if the limbs are pulled in. Read about the Lussi method for learning jumps (one of our rink's coaches is Nancy Lussi).
    This. This is what most people need to focus on, as the way you were taught the Waltz jump directly affects how much "relearning" you'll have to do to get a decent axel.

    People who were taught the straight legged Waltz jumps tend to have swingy axels that do not go up.

    Another thing is that you have to get used to jumping higher and pulling in more. This is an easy think to get down if you focus on it with your other singles, but if you are used to jumping as small as possible with really open positions, the Axel will be harder to get. It requires more rotation and a tighter air position unless you're a HUGE jumper, and therefore it requires more airtime than a normal single (almost as much airtime as some doubles, really, as those are generally 1.5 rotation jumps, anyways).

  4. #19
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    Mar 2013
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    Great Britain
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    I'm having problems with my axel too - I just can't seem to cross my feet tight enough so I two-foot a lot. I had them pretty good 2 weeks ago but I've completely lost it - frustrating! The same is happening with my double sal and toe.

    I'm going to try getting more height on them though as I think this will help a lot.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantom View Post
    I have to say, that I personally disagree with this. Axel is quite a simple jump, you just need to understand the basic movements required to do it.
    Simple for whom? It's one thing to understand the movements, and another thing to do it. Many skaters don't get the axel. Obviously if you have a jump, it's going to seem "simple" than if you don't have the jump.

    Quote Originally Posted by treesprite View Post
    Doing waltz jumps isn't going to help much unless you do them a different way than most people seem to do them. When I do a waltz jump to do a waltz jump, I go more for distance and extension. For the 1/2 rotation jump to gear up for axel work, I focus on jumping upwards and keeping my leg close instead of extended. The continuation of the rotation will happen automatically if the limbs are pulled in. Read about the Lussi method for learning jumps (one of our rink's coaches is Nancy Lussi).
    Do you know exactly what method this is? I have the Lussi jumps tape, and he teaches the Axel as delayed. This basically involves going into the axel like a waltz jump with straight legs. Requires a TON of height.

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