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Thread: Best and Worst Moments of the London Games

  1. #16
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    the IOC also disallowed London to pay tribute to the Munich victims... granted it happened many moons ago, but still... it would've been a nice gesture, and something that - since the people running the ceremonies asked - should have been allowed.

  2. #17
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serious Business
    Local businesses were strictly forbidden from mentioning the games in any way at all, not unless they're official sponsors, which of course, they can't afford to be. So despite the games going right next door, pubs and cafes were not allowed to scrawl any supportive messages on their blackboards, or invite people to any watching parties, etc.
    Are the civil courts and the laws of England on the side of the IOC in this? If a local pub had held an Olympics party, and the IOC said "you must pay us a thousand dollar fine," and the pub owner said," I don't think so" -- what would happen next?

    What would have happened if the journalist whose umbrella was seized would have hit the seizers over the head with it, citing "stand your ground?"

    (At least you could have an Olympics party at your own house, right? "An Englishman's home is his castle, sir -- while there's Law in England!")
    Last edited by Mathman; 08-15-2012 at 10:14 PM.

  3. #18
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    well if he hit the person with the umbrella, it'd be considered assault

  4. #19
    Like subtlety in ice dancing Serious Business's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Are the civil courts and the laws of England on the side of the IOC in this? If a local pub had held an Olympics party, and the IOC said "you must pay us a thousand dollar fine," and the pub owner said," I don't think so" -- what would happen next?
    The court would be likely on the side of the IOC, because Great Britain passed a special law just for this in 2006 called the London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Act that codifies into law the IOC demands on regulating advertising. The act specifically bans non-sponsors from using phrases that combine words like London, 2012, gold, silver, etc. It even gives British police power to enter any premise to investigate claims of unauthorized advertising and to destroy any such material found!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    What would have happened if the journalist whose umbrella was seized would have hit the seizers over the head with it, citing "stand your ground?"
    I'm sure those officials are empowered by law to seize/censor any brand/logo in violation. And if they aren't, it wouldn't be hard for them to summon law enforcement who are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    (At least you could have an Olympics party at your own house, right? "An Englishman's home is his castle, sir -- while there's Law in England!")
    Probably. But the law specifically says it's not just advertising that's covered, but any promotional material. So to stay on the safe side, Londoners would've been better off not passing out any flyers in public or putting up notices about an Olympic watching party in their homes.

  5. #20
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    I loved these Olympics overall (my favorite summer Olympics ever, Calgary for the winter games), but I was disappointed with the choppy coverage of NBC (it seemed like rings were not shown at all in the men's team competition), the broken up coverage of the closing ceremonies, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonichelle View Post
    the IOC also disallowed London to pay tribute to the Munich victims... granted it happened many moons ago, but still... it would've been a nice gesture, and something that - since the people running the ceremonies asked - should have been allowed.
    This lack of sensitivity on the part of the IOC bothered me the most! I understand that the opening ceremony paid tribute to the victims of the London attack the day after the games were awarded to London (NBC didn't show that, and certainly should have). The Vancouver games had a moment of silence for the Georgian luger. The SLC games had the World Trade Center Flag ceremony in 2002. Shame on the IOC for not allowing one moment of silence for the Israeli athletes were were wantonly murdered in Munich 40 years ago. Kudos to Bob Costas for standing up to the IOC and making his comments when the Israeli athletes entered the stadium!

  6. #21
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    I was also taken aback by the lack of a tribute. It's not as if these were a group of just any people who died. They were Olympians, taken at the Olympic village, and the event unfolded before our eyes during Olympic coverage. And that was done on purpose by the perpetrators to garner worldwide publicity. What could be more relevant to Olympic history?

  7. #22
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    I loved Bbc coverage that could watch online whenever I wanted, our 24h coverage and the normal time difference, the opening ceremony up until the steal era and Kenneth Branag, gymnastics team finals and AA, douglas, komova and mustafina, the Pole vault of ladies, the 4x 100 relay of men, Bolt superstar status, Jessica Ennis, team Spain on sychronized swimming, men diving 10m, Uchimura, men finals vault, the marathon, Italy at rythmic gymnastics ensemble and Cyprus winning their first Olympic medal ever!!!

    I didnt like Ye Shiwen accusations from known coach, Komova and Douglas at event finals, that we came 9th at rythmic gymnastics and lost Q, that we got only two medals, Iordache unlucky appearance, the closing ceremony- Lenon, Freddie and Bowie mention was great but then Spice Girls, Super models and Take that, really?

    I have a lot more to recall now.

  8. #23
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    There were so many bests. The Queen actually taking part as a Bond girl, the National Health segment, and getting to see all the athletes for the first time. All the competitions had marvelous moments, of course. I loved the rowing and equestrian events when I got to see them. I'm so glad I finally got to view the rhythmic gymnastics; they are simply stupendous.

    I'm sorry Greece didn't so so well this time. I always root for them. I was just doing research on Olympic history and read a wonderful eyewitness account of the first modern Games, in Athens in 1896. The reporter was especially excited about the entry into the arena of marathon winner Spiridon Louis. It's so great that the first marathon ever was won by a Greek runner. You guys are about due for another one!

  9. #24
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    For me, as an American the worst thing about the London games were the ridiculoulsy embarrassing comments made by Mitt "the Twit" Romney.

    Great and well deserved moments were the follow ups by the Brit PM and the Mayor of London.

    It is easy enough to see who was right
    Last edited by janetfan; 08-16-2012 at 02:08 PM.

  10. #25
    Like subtlety in ice dancing Serious Business's Avatar
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    Cultural and social milestones

    The Olympic games, in both its ideals and many times in practice, reflect the best progressive and peaceful impulses of society. And indeed, the London games proved to be the most socially advanced and humanistic one yet!

    Gender equality:

    We've come a long way from the ancient games in which women weren't even allowed to attend! There is still considerable prejudice against female athletes outside of aesthetic sports like figure skating and gymnastics. But the London Olympics did more to change that than perhaps any sporting competition before it.

    For the first time ever, every country sent female athletes to the games. There are three Olympic participating countries who never sent female athletes to the games before. In 2012, that all changed, when Brunei, Saudi Arabia and Qatar all realized that women deserve their place in the sun, too. That the spirit of sports, fairness, competition and friendship should not be held back by gender oppression. Yes, it took considerable pressure from the IOC and activists within those countries, but now that the door is opened it's unlikely to ever close again.

    For the first time ever, the US sent more female than male athletes to the games. It's fitting that on the 40th anniversary of Title IX (the US law that pushed school sports into giving women better access), female athletes in the US have finally caught up to and even exceeded their male counterparts in the biggest sporting event in the world. And the women more than pulled their weight. 55% of the medals won by the US at these Olympics were won by women! An even larger proportion of gold medals won by the US were won by women! This is especially amazing when you consider that men get over 100 more medals awarded to them at the Olympics than women. US women are the reason the US won the medal count at these Olympics. Unfortunately, in terms of coverage and sponsorship, the women still lag far behind men in the US. But we're getting there!

    Gay/bisexual visibility

    There were a record 21 openly gay or bisexual athletes at these Olympics, over twice the number of the 2008 Olympics! In addition to the athletes, there were a number of openly gay/bisexual coaches and journalists as well, such as Pia Sundhage, the coach of the US women's football team, and former NBA player John Amaechi, who commentated on basketball matches. This unprecedented visibility shows how much progress gay/bi people have made recently. On the biggest stage in the world, people heralded as heroes and the epitome of physical achievement are freer to be who they are.

    The Netherlands' women's field hockey team had four openly gay/bi players, all four of whom participated in the gold medal match. This is the highest number of openly gay/bi people sharing an Olympic podium ever. A win in more ways than one.

    France's triathletes Jessica Harrison and Carole Péon are a couple. Which, as far as I can find, marks the first time a same-sex couple competed openly as teammates at the Olympics. There have been opposite-sex teammates and pairs competing together at the Olympics before, of course, but this is entirely new.

    Overall, nearly half of all the openly gay/bi athletes at the Olympics won a medal, the majority of them gold! It's heartening to see that coming out did not impede their athletic success.

    The lack of transgender visibility

    Unfortunately, the T in LGBT got no representation at these games, at all. There were no openly trans/intersex athletes competing. And, as far as I know, there weren't even any trans coaches or journalists involved.

    If anything, progress for trans people were set back at these Olympics. The IAAF, the governing body of track and field, started to require female athletes take hormone suppressants to compete if their natural testosterone level is close to that of the average male. This decision has no scientific basis. There is no proof that higher testosterone level gives female athletes an advantage (in fact, there's some proof against it). And even if there were, outlawing natural advantages that an athlete got by dint of birth is ridiculous. What next? Banning tall people from basketball? It's a decision purely based on superstitious notions of gender. It also creates an ongoing witch hunt for intersex athletes.

  11. #26
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I was just doing research on Olympic history and read a wonderful eyewitness account of the first modern Games, in Athens in 1896. The reporter was especially excited about the entry into the arena of marathon winner Spiridon Louis. It's so great that the first marathon ever was won by a Greek runner. You guys are about due for another one!
    He was a water carrier and he toured his water in the streets of my north suburb where I live in Athens, when you enter my road you see a huge sign with him

  12. #27
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    Best moments:

    Phelps won his first individual gold medal in this event

    Missy Franklin's first gold win

    Gabby Douglas's win and her smile

    Bolt's wins

    US basketball gold match with Spain

    Best uniform:

    USA



    Worst moments:

    Opening ceremony

    Federer's loss

    Too much water polo and beach volleyball coverage
    Last edited by Bluebonnet; 08-17-2012 at 03:47 PM.

  13. #28
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    How can you not like water polo?

  14. #29
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    How can you not like water polo?
    oh it's so easy.... lol

  15. #30
    Banned janetfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonichelle View Post
    oh it's so easy.... lol
    Here, here.....what an odd sport.
    Now if we could teach dolphins to play this waterlogged excuse of a sport it might actually have a chance to become popular here.

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