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Thread: Asthma Medicine & Skaters Question

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    Asthma Medicine & Skaters Question

    This is probably a dumb question, but are skaters allowed to take corticosteroids? How about albuterol?

    Thanks :D
    Last edited by FTnoona; 10-06-2012 at 10:39 PM.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Nope. They get the same urine doping tests as other Olympic athletes.

    In fact, some OTC cold medicines will get you disciplined.

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    So athletes with severe asthma would have to find another form of long term asthma medication then. Do you know if rescue inhalers are permissible?
    Because I was reading this article about asthma mediation and I thought it was interesting.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/22/sp...pagewanted=all

    If even some rescue inhalers are banned, can you really blame the skater for looking like he/she is going to pass out after he/she finishes their program. I was just curious b/c I've read some posts that I interpret as ppl thinking those with asthma experience the same trigger and severity and if person A can overcome it person B should be able to too. To me it almost seemed like some believe that the skater should just "suck it up".
    Last edited by FTnoona; 10-06-2012 at 04:24 PM.

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    Yeah, it seems unfair. I still remember swimmer Rick DeMont, aged only sixteen, who had to give his gold medal back in 1972, because he took an asthma medication that turned out to be banned. He was later proved to be completely innocent, but the sports authority (can't remember if it's the IOC or the swimming folk) has consistently refused to restore his medal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Yeah, it seems unfair. I still remember swimmer Rick DeMont, aged only sixteen, who had to give his gold medal back in 1972, because he took an asthma medication that turned out to be banned. He was later proved to be completely innocent, but the sports authority (can't remember if it's the IOC or the swimming folk) has consistently refused to restore his medal.
    That really unfair for him. I tried to google what type of steroids were allowed and I found this ISU first aid kit list or w/e and I didn't see corticosteroids on the allowed steroid list. That really sucks for asthmatic athletes who want to control their asthma.
    Last edited by FTnoona; 10-07-2012 at 01:23 AM.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    It's difficult, for sure, although apparently some asthma medications are allowed.

    I don't know how these kids manage to compete sometimes.

    You see kids come off the ice and have to have their inhalers. Tonya Harding didn't used to even wait until she was out of sight-she'd often be using the inhaler immediately on stepping off the ice.

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    Celebrating the Excellence of #VirtueMoir golden411's Avatar
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    I found the information below on a US Anti-Doping Agency page about Therapeutic Use Exemption:

    Do inhaled asthma medications need to be declared?
    As of January 1, 2011, references to Declarations have been removed from the WADA 2011 Prohibited List. This includes the inhaled beta-2 agonists Albuterol and Salmeterol, and Glucocorticosteroids such as Fluticasone and Budesonide. These medications no longer need to be declared to USADA or the International Federation prior to use. The medications should still be listed (declared) on the DCOR at the time of testing.
    http://www.usada.org/tue-faq/

    WADA = World Anti-Doping Agency
    DCOR = Doping Control Official Record

    ETA:
    After Four Continents 2012 in Colorado Springs, when the low-key Charlie White was downplaying the significance of his asthma, didn't he say that as long as he took his medication and was careful with documentation, it was not such a big deal?
    I realize that he minimized the medical and regulatory issues to avoid sounding like a crybaby -- for which he has my admiration. From family experience, I know that asthma cannot be taken lightly, even for non-athletes.
    Just saying that the best-case scenario seems to be that it can be well-managed with drugs that are permissible.
    Last edited by golden411; 10-07-2012 at 03:20 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by golden411 View Post
    I found the information below on a US Anti-Doping Agency page about Therapeutic Use Exemption:

    Do inhaled asthma medications need to be declared?
    As of January 1, 2011, references to Declarations have been removed from the WADA 2011 Prohibited List. This includes the inhaled beta-2 agonists Albuterol and Salmeterol, and Glucocorticosteroids such as Fluticasone and Budesonide. These medications no longer need to be declared to USADA or the International Federation prior to use. The medications should still be listed (declared) on the DCOR at the time of testing.
    http://www.usada.org/tue-faq/

    WADA = World Anti-Doping Agency
    DCOR = Doping Control Official Record

    ETA:
    After Four Continents 2012 in Colorado Springs, when the low-key Charlie White was downplaying the significance of his asthma, didn't he say that as long as he took his medication and was careful with documentation, it was not such a big deal?
    I realize that he minimized the medical and regulatory issues to avoid sounding like a crybaby -- for which he has my admiration. From family experience, I know that asthma cannot be taken lightly, even for non-athletes.
    Just saying that the best-case scenario seems to be that it can be well-managed with drugs that are permissible.
    Thanks so much for the info. Does declaring it make any difference on its permissibility or is just for something like "I know that you need to take ____ medicine so when I find it in your system you won't be caught for doping"?

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    It's especially challenging when skaters are competing at high altitude. Last year at Four Continents, which was held in the Rockies, Charlie White looked as pale as his last name and almost seemed to be leaning on Meryl as he left the ice.

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    Celebrating the Excellence of #VirtueMoir golden411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTnoona View Post
    Thanks so much for the info. Does declaring it make any difference on its permissibility or is just for something like "I know that you need to take ____ medicine so when I find it in your system you won't be caught for doping"?
    Not sure that I understand the dichotomy posed in your question.
    But my guess is that exceptions are made for certain prohibited drugs IF an athlete has a therapeutic need (verified by one or more doctors, no doubt).
    In other words, I think the idea is that with the proper paperwork, an asthmatic athlete would be allowed to use certain drugs that are prohibited for non-asthmatics.

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    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by golden411 View Post
    In other words, I think the idea is that with the proper paperwork, an asthmatic athlete would be allowed to use certain drugs that are prohibited for non-asthmatics.
    AFAIK, that's not true, unless it's life threatening and they collapse and are rushed to the hospital...

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    To reword my question. Will the declared drug always be 100% permissible if it is albuterol, salmeterol, or a glucocorticosteroids? Basically they only want the athlete to declare their asthma medication when they are tested for drugs but any other time they can just use it without a problem? The authorities just want to know that it's in your system so they won't be alarmed when it shows up on the test?

    @ Tonichelle
    so asthmatic athletes can't use their inhalers unless they are showing signs of great distress?

    I'm confused now. Sorry :(

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    I found an article on the subject, written prior to the London Games:

    http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/he...163964056.html

    “Interestingly, mountain bikers are the No. 1 Olympic athletes who tend to have asthma,” said Dr. Jackie. “When they’re working their lungs, they’re working on an incline, which is tougher.”

    Dr. Jackie also said the Winter Games tend to pose the greatest health challenge to asthmatics because of the cold, dry air.

    ...

    “It’s due to the dehydration of the airways,” according to Dr. Jackie. “They’ll wheeze and cough when they exercise.”
    This seems to be on point:

    Treating Olympic athletes who need asthma medications can be tricky because of drug restrictions. First of all, athletes have to put in applications to use their meds.

    “During the 2008 Beijing games, there were more than 1,000 applications approved for asthmatics,” Dr. Jackie said. “There are two types of meds for them. One is an inhaled steroid that doesn’t bulk up the muscle but still needs approval. The other is a beta-agonist, which opens the lungs but also speeds up the heart rate. You have to be properly worked up if you know you need those meds.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    I found an article on the subject, written prior to the London Games:

    http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/he...163964056.html



    This seems to be on point:
    By "properly worked up", that mean proper paperwork all finished and handed in right? After that there is nothing stopping the athlete from taking his/her medication? Sorry for all the questions.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    If it's one of the approved meds. The article says it can't be a steroid that bulks up muscles, if I understand correctly I might have missed it though.

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