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Thread: Steven Spielberg's Lincoln

  1. #46
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    Yes, Robert Lincoln did rather well for a President's son. Many of them carried a heavy burden and couldn't rise above the pressure of carrying on the family name. Robert eventually became the president of the Pullman Corporation, I believe. My favorite paragraph in the Wiki article is the one about how Edwin Booth, John Wilkes Booth's brother, once saved Robert from injury when a train he was standing on lurched and almost threw him off. Booth didn't recognize Lincoln, but Lincoln knew who Booth, America's greatest actor, was and sent word to him, thanking him. The article says that this knowledge brought Edwin some comfort when he felt such shame and despair that his brother had shot the President.

    The only two countries I know about for sure in terms of slaves' being freed are England (about 1808) and Russia, where they had serfs (coincidentally, freed in 1861, by royal edict of the tsar, Alexander II). Ironic, isn't it? If the United States had not declared its independence from England, slavery would have been abolished here much earlier. Think about it: where did runaway slaves try to get to for safety? Canada, which at that point was a British possession.
    Last edited by Olympia; 12-07-2012 at 08:42 PM.

  2. #47
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    Olympia, yes...thanks! I do love Irony in history....as well as unintended consequences....there is a great scene at the end of the movie, "Charlie Wilson's War" after Wilson helps Osama Bin Laden defeat the Russians in Afganistan, which was, at the time, thought to be a good thing. An charactor questions the obvious. Was it a good thing or a bad thing? He tells a story where, during each segment of a son's life, he asked his father if this or that decision was a good thing or a bad thing, and the father tells his son, "We'll see".
    The meaning of course is that one never knows at the time if anything is good or bad in the long run. It takes historical perspective but even that only takes one to the present. Was Pearl Harbor a good thing for the world or a bad thing? We'll see.

  3. #48
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    Someday I'll be brave enough to watch Charlie Wilson's War. Yes, that whole Afghanistan episode is filled with heartbreaking irony. We were on their side, and much good it did us.

  4. #49
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    It is a very interesting book and movie for the history buff. And you are correct...we didnt get much credit for that from the countries of the middle east, just like we didnt get any credit for stopping the slaughter/deportation of Muslim Albanians in Yugo/Kosavo in 1999.
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Someday I'll be brave enough to watch Charlie Wilson's War. Yes, that whole Afghanistan episode is filled with heartbreaking irony. We were on their side, and much good it did us.

  5. #50
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    One of the earliest outlawing of slavery was done by the country/state of....Vermont.

    http://www.slavenorth.com/vermont.htm

    The newly formed state, which broke away from New York, abolished slavery outright in its constitution, dated July 8, 1777.

    The relevant section is Chapter I, subtitled "A DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE INHABITANTS OF THE STATE OF VERMONT"


    I. THAT all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety. Therefore, no male person, born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person, as a servant, slave or apprentice, after he arrives to the age of twenty-one Years, nor female, in like manner, after she arrives to the age of eighteen years, unless they are bound by their own consent, after they arrive to such age, or bound by law, for the payment of debts, damages, fines, costs, or the like.
    After declaring its independence, Vermont existed as a free republic known as the Commonwealth of Vermont. It was admitted to the union in 1791, with a state constitution that also contained the slavery ban. The 1777 constitution entitles Vermont to claim to be the first U.S. state to have abolished slavery.
    And because of its tenure as a free republic, in some lists, it is the first country to ban slavery.

  6. #51
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    Delightful to realize, Doris! I've always loved Vermont, and now I have even more reason to.

    A friend of mine is active in the Prudence Crandall Museum, a tiny enterprise that takes place I think out of a house she occupied. She's symbolic of the early people who somehow figured out what was right. One of her defenders was a minister named Samuel May, whose equally forward-thinking sister eventually married Bronson Alcott and gave birth to Louisa May Alcott. (I always thought Louisa's middle name was the girl's name May, but au contraire, it was her mother's surname.)

    The whole Amistad affair, the defense of the Africans who mutinied on their way to being sold as slaves in Cuba, also took part in Connecticut. It points up a number of other folk who heroically went against the assumptions of the time. I take particular delight in the fact that one of the lawyers involved was another Presidential son, John Quincy Adams, whose long, active public life started in the Revolutionary War and ended with his being a staunch abolitionist. At least one of the Amistad Africans spent time in America: the young girl Margru returned to the States to be educated in Oberlin, the first American college that admitted black people and even--gasp--women.

  7. #52
    Mashimaro on Ice
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    I watched Lincoln last weekend. The acting in this film is terrific. Daniel Day Lewis IS Lincoln.

  8. #53
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    ooh, good to hear such a favorable review.

  9. #54
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    I would suggest, if you like movies, to really see this one in the theatre. I dont think one can totally appreciate DDL's performance on the small screen. Everything about his facial expressions is important. I will predict it will get the Acadamy award for best actor, and at least nominations for best suporting actress, screenplay, director, and costumes.

  10. #55
    I like pie. Tonichelle's Avatar
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    I would go see it if they'd play it here! *pouts*

  11. #56
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    After seeing the 60 min spot on Hugh Jackman, I am not so confindent about who is gonna win the acadamy award for best actor.......

  12. #57
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    Just saw it yesterday afternoon (we recorded the GPF coverage and watched it afterwards). Superb -a must see film. It didn't feel like 2 & 1/2 hours (ITA with sillylionlove).

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