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Thread: Buttle busier than ever on the ice

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    Keepin' it real gsk8's Avatar
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    News Buttle busier than ever on the ice

    If anyone had to find a way to describe Jeffrey Buttle's resume, it would be perhaps that he continues to pursue and find success in skating, long after retiring as a competitive athlete.

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    Wouldn't it be fun to see a bunch of figure skaters play a hockey game.....I think Jeff might be an exception as Scott Moir, Charlie White, and Kurt all played hockey at one point or another........as I'm sure many others did. No fighting though

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    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravensque View Post
    Wouldn't it be fun to see a bunch of figure skaters play a hockey game.....I think Jeff might be an exception as Scott Moir, Charlie White, and Kurt all played hockey at one point or another........as I'm sure many others did. No fighting though
    Kurt played in a peewee league for just a few short years, i think white went far longer, not sure moir.

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    So happy that Buttle has stayed in skating. Love that guy's approach to skating. He's turning into a fine choreographer.

    One of the greatest pastimes of a skating fan is contemplating the string of fabulous men's singles champions from Canada. From Don Jackson through Toller, Brian O., Kurt, Elvis, Emanuel S., and Jeffrey, to Patrick; feel free to add anyone I've left out. And each one different, from the athletic Jackson to the bohemian Cranston, to lightning-quick Orser, all-encompassing Kurt, combat-ready Elvis, sinuously balletic head case Emanuel, elegant Buttle, superbly masterful Chan. What do you folk put in the water up there?
    Last edited by Olympia; 12-28-2012 at 01:46 PM.

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    First off, hockey boys are sent to the CanSkate programs run by Skate Canada to learn to skate. In this way, they don't have to waste precious ice-time teaching the children basic skating skills. Most figure skating clubs are located in publically owned community recreation centres. Yes, the Cricket, Granite and Royal Glenora are all very expensive, invitation only private clubs, but the Mariposa Club which has produced 3 of the World and Olympic medalists mentioned above, is located in a community recreation centre in Barrie. Sandu's home club - 8 Rinks in Burnaby BC is a public facility as is the Minto Club - home of Don Jackson. Only Cranston and Chan came out of the private Toronto Clubs.

    The figure skating clubs must share ice-time with the minor hockey leagues operating out of the same facilities. This is why the hockey clubs send kids to Can-Skate. Ice-time for practices is expensive and precious. The figure skating clubs make money on the Can-Skate programs which helps them subsidize ice time for their competitive programs, where fewer skaters are on the ice at the same time. As a bonus, sometimes the boys find they really like figure skating, and they stay.

    Last but certainly not least, talented boys are fawned and treated as something very special. Everyone is wondering if this boy will be the "next one" as Rod Black used to call them. I gather talented young girls in the US are treated similarly. Talented girls are a dime a dozen here but a talented boy will get a lot of attention.

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    Custom Title spikydurian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    Last but certainly not least, talented boys are fawned and treated as something very special. Everyone is wondering if this boy will be the "next one" as Rod Black used to call them. I gather talented young girls in the US are treated similarly. Talented girls are a dime a dozen here but a talented boy will get a lot of attention.
    Dragonlady, why is it that a talented 'boy' gets a lot more attention than a talented 'girl' in Canada? (Hey..that's gender discrimination ) And why is it that the reverse may be true in the U.S. that 'talented girls' seem to be more valued than 'talented boys'? I am curious.

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    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    Dragonlady, why is it that a talented 'boy' gets a lot more attention than a talented 'girl' in Canada? (Hey..that's gender discrimination ) And why is it that the reverse may be true in the U.S. that 'talented girls' seem to be more valued than 'talented boys'? I am curious.
    In the US we've had as much success in men's as in ladies, so we're definitely different than Canada in that regard

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    I'm willing to guess that the problem in the U.S. is not that talented boys are ignored. It's that boys don't tend to gravitate to figure skating in the U.S. It's a niche sport at best in the States, unless it's about a girl who could be the next America's Sweetheart. Guys tend to see this sport as ballet on ice. I honestly don't know how Canada cultivates a more sensible mindset, but they seem to.

    Dragonlady, if it's true that talented girls are a dime a dozen in Canada, the national federation is missing a huge chance by not cultivating them. But I can't imagine that's true. Canada has so many wonderful men, frequently some tremendous pairs, and a proud tradition of ice dance. Why would the federation ignore ladies singles skaters? Maybe I'm missing your point. Long day, very tired. My apologies!

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    Sitting Here on Blue Jay Way silver.blades's Avatar
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    The biggest difference you see in the treatment of boys and girls in skating in Canada is the mindset that girls skate as a physical pass time, its for fun and isn't serious, unless the kid decides to take it seriously, for boys however it is treated as a competitive sport from the beginning. Girls just aren't pushed like the boys are because there is such a shortage of boys. I know as a coach I get ridiculously excited when I get a boy in figure skates.

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    As the parent of a girl who figure skated, I couldn't help but notice how differently the boys were treated. We changed clubs when our coach left one club and moved to the next and a whole group of young skaters moved with him. We all arrived for our first session - 7 skaters with one or more parents, plus siblings, and we were greeted by the club president. He made a huge deal about one of the boys saying how happy he was to have him in the club since he had won a gold medal at the most recent Thornhill competition. My daughter had also won a gold medal at Thornhill in the same competition but that wasn't even mentioned.

    Going to the Men's Long Program at Canadians is like attending a rock concert. The crowd is large, loud and ready to party.

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    Jeff is developing into a good choreographer. I’m sure he’ll be even busier because more skaters will ask him for programs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    Going to the Men's Long Program at Canadians is like attending a rock concert. The crowd is large, loud and ready to party.
    That’s because Canadian men skaters are hot and talented, Kurt, Jeff, and now Patrick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    As the parent of a girl who figure skated, I couldn't help but notice how differently the boys were treated. We changed clubs when our coach left one club and moved to the next and a whole group of young skaters moved with him. We all arrived for our first session - 7 skaters with one or more parents, plus siblings, and we were greeted by the club president. He made a huge deal about one of the boys saying how happy he was to have him in the club since he had won a gold medal at the most recent Thornhill competition. My daughter had also won a gold medal at Thornhill in the same competition but that wasn't even mentioned.
    For real? If that's true, it's amazing and bewildering that coaches and other powers-that-be don't make the connection between their cavalier treatment of girls and their near-total lack of a world-level ladies' singles skater (Rochette being an exception). Strange to think that Japan, which people see as having a traditional view of the role of women in society, is so much more egalitarian about nurturing female skaters.

  13. #13
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    Jeff Buttle is a wonderful role model for these skaters. A very intelligent and poised young man who has made an easy and successful transition to a professional career. I remember his performances live in Gøteborg. He was spot on!! I think Johnny, Evan and Plushenko can learn a lot from Jeff and make good transitions to proffesional careers in skating or other venues without the 'brass ring' mentality that seems to permeate the sport today. Keep up the fantastic work Jeff!

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    Custom Title spikydurian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside View Post
    That’s because Canadian men skaters are hot and talented, Kurt, Jeff, and now Patrick.
    Oh yeah. Couldn't agree more.

    Quote Originally Posted by senatormls
    Jeff Buttle is a wonderful role model for these skaters. A very intelligent and poised young man who has made an easy and successful transition to a professional career. I remember his performances live in Gøteborg. He was spot on!! I think Johnny, Evan and Plushenko can learn a lot from Jeff and make good transitions to proffesional careers in skating or other venues without the 'brass ring' mentality that seems to permeate the sport today. Keep up the fantastic work Jeff!
    Indeed he is. I think he intended to return to continue his engineering course in University but he is doing well in his professional and choreography career that he has postponed his studies. He knows what he wanted and was pragmatic about his chances. He knows how to move on. Chan has said of Buttle, the most artistic skater he has met and that Buttle is a very good person too. To be judged in such light by a (past) fellow competitor and colleague, is revealing. I think Jeff will continue his rise in the world of choreography.

  15. #15
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
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    I couldn't be happier for Jeff - wonderful skater, gracious person, and now we get to appreciate his talent as a choreographer!

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