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Thread: New Year Greetings by Tatiana and Maxim

  1. #1
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    New Year Greetings by Tatiana and Maxim

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tq9NzydvKY8

    Could someone help me and translate what they are saying, please?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    So this doesn't address the translation question, but I just now realize that V/T have the same respective first names as Tatiana Totmianina and Maxim Marinin! My mind is blown!

    They look so cute, and so does their little puppy. Thanks for sharing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by volotrankov View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tq9NzydvKY8

    Could someone help me and translate what they are saying, please?

    Thank you
    Tatyana&Max: They introduced themselves and the doggy whose name is Dexter ().

    Max: They (they both used "we", i.e. spoke as a Pair) congratulated everyone with Happy New Year, wished people to have a very joyful time on these festive days and all year around, be in good health, with all happiness and luck, succeed in everything, stay with positive emotions only. To all Russian athletes- win all golds and medals they wish.

    Tatyana: Of course we wish you inspiration, kindness, happiness, positiveness and all the best in the New Year.

    Bye-Bye!

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    Thanks, Let's Talk!

    Can someone tell me why there seem to be so many varied Russian surnames and a rather small pool of first names? I've almost never heard a skater's or a gymnast's surname repeated (except in obvious cases like Dmitriev, father and son). Yet I hear relatively few first names, and when we refer to skaters by their first names, I have to stop and think about which people are being referred to. Russia has a larger population than the U.S., but the U.S. has a far greater variety of first names. I'd say that this is an unfair comparison because the U.S. is so ethnically diverse, but Russia is also ethnically diverse, from its history of having all those republics at various times. Any thoughts? Is Russia one of those countries like Iceland or Sweden where there's an authority that forbids certain names?

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    Interesting questions, Olympia. Yes, on the surface, it would seem like there are fewer popular first names in Russia than in the U.S. In the last few years, we skating fans have tended to hear many of the same names over and over--Yekaterina, Yelena, Tatiana, Maxim, for example. However, if you do some reading of Russian literature/history, you'll find there are many, many more first names than you commonly hear these days. For example, girls' names such as Marfa, Avdotiya, Kapitolina, Klavdiya, and Antonina appear in Crime and Punishment and Dr. Zhivago, yet have seldom been seen as skaters' names. I don't know if there is a naming authority, but perhaps the prevalence of use of popular names is simply greater in Russia than here (just as in the U.S., popular boys' names are more prevalently/widely used than popular girls' names).

    Perhaps AlexRus could share some insight on this.

    A Web resource regarding Russian first names:

    http://masterrussian.com/aa031001b.shtml

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    I honestly was expecting to see Tomanina and Marinin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by let`s talk View Post
    Tatyana&Max: They introduced themselves and the doggy whose name is Dexter ().

    Max: They (they both used "we", i.e. spoke as a Pair) congratulated everyone with Happy New Year, wished people to have a very joyful time on these festive days and all year around, be in good health, with all happiness and luck, succeed in everything, stay with positive emotions only. To all Russian athletes- win all golds and medals they wish.

    Tatyana: Of course we wish you inspiration, kindness, happiness, positiveness and all the best in the New Year.

    Bye-Bye!
    Thank you so much for your help on the translation!!

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    whose dog is it?

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    Russia's population is half the united states'.

    Thanks for translating.

    The name issue is interesting but popular names are popular names. Like the Russian Presidents have all had cliche names for Russian men. Boris, dmitiri and Vladimir!!

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    Silly me! Whoops....I was thinking of the populaton of the Soviet Union, which was around 400 million. You're right, of course: the sovereign nation of Russia, which is minus many of the old republics, is only about 142 million. My apologies to both countries and all publishers of encyclopedias. Thanks for catching that gaffe, Gmyers!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Is Russia one of those countries like Iceland or Sweden where there's an authority that forbids certain names?
    No, there is none. It's all about the historical usage of biblical name, Orthodox in case of Russia. So, that's why the good deal of names are of Greek or Jewish origin. There are some orginally Slavic though, like Vladimir (Putin).

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    Russia is a multiethnic country, even more ethnically diverse than the US with 150+ ethnic groups
    its true typically first names are very typical but its the last names that you will know their heritage, there are many similar first names
    but by last name you can almost know their heritage like

    Gerboldt, Enbert, Abt are German last names
    Plushenko is a Ukraianian last name "ko"
    Elizaveta Tuktamysheva , "Tuktamysheva" is not a Russian Surname by its root word, she is an ethnic udmurt
    Ruslan(typical caucasus male name) "Zhiganshin" who is a tatar,
    Sikhuralidze, Gedevanishvili, Gosviyani and Maisurdze are Georgian Surnames,
    Li ( Lee) is a Korean, Sakhanovich sounds like a tatar or tungustic root word to me.
    Last edited by sky_fly20; 01-06-2013 at 01:52 PM.

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    They are such a great team and such nice people. I hope they win Worlds this year, especialy after being robbed of the GP final and World golds last year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sky_fly20 View Post
    Russia is a multiethnic country, even more ethnically diverse than the US with 150+ ethnic groups
    its true typically first names are very typical but its the last names that you will know their heritage, there are many similar first names
    but by last name you can almost know their heritage like

    Gerboldt, Enbert, Abt are German last names
    Plushenko is a Ukraianian last name "ko"
    Elizaveta Tuktamysheva , "Tuktamysheva" is not a Russian Surname by its root word, she is an ethnic udmurt
    Ruslan(typical caucasus male name) "Zhiganshin" who is a tatar,
    Sikhuralidze, Gedevanishvili, Gosviyani and Maisurdze are Georgian Surnames,
    Li ( Lee) is a Korean, Sakhanovich sounds like a tatar or tungustic root word to me.
    Thanks! This stuff fascinates me and always has. This is what I was thinking toward when I brought up my point, because I knew that Russia has such a varied ethnic makeup. Thanks for clarifying it and furnishing such wonderful details.

    I knew about two of the Georgian suffixes, -idze and -vili. and the -enko Ukrainian suffix, but the others are new to me. (Well, except for Li.) I wasn't aware that the name Ruslan was from the Caucasus. I've always loved that name, since learning of Glinka's opera Ruslan and Ludmilla (based on the Pushkin poem). The overture is one of the most exhilarating pieces of music ever--I think it marks the beginning of Russian national musical style, an opening salvo of one of the world's greatest music traditions, and it just emanates new starts and springtime.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjUijyeFMu0
    Last edited by Olympia; 01-06-2013 at 07:05 PM.

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