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Thread: Is Plushenko Too Old For This Sport?

  1. #91
    leave no stone unturned seniorita's Avatar
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    News in english
    Evgeni Plushenko will have an back operation Thursday that will leave him temporarily unable to walk and out of the sport "for a long time," his coach Alexei Mishin told R-Sport on Wednesday.

    Plushenko will be unable to walk for a month, realistically ending his hopes of competing at the world championships in March, and the focus will be on chasing his dream of a second Olympic gold medal in Sochi next year.
    “Tomorrow, he will undergo the operation, but his preparation plans won’t be altered, because he’ll be able to walk and swim in four weeks’ time.” “The recovery will last a long time, but not so much to set back his preparation for the (2013-14) season where the main competition will be the Olympics,” Mishin said.
    Oh..

  2. #92
    Off the ice Buttercup's Avatar
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    I have a ton of respect for Plushenko and would love to see him go out with a great performance. But reading about all his health issues, and now this surgery, I really wish he'd call an end to his competitive career. He has nothing left to prove to anyone and he's risking his long-term health; I'd hate to see him face the possible consequences of that. I really do feel that he should call it a day and perform in shows instead, so that his many fans can continue to enjoy his skating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorita View Post
    Thanks seniorita - I re-posted the link in the Injuries thread.

    Otherwise, I don't know what to say - we'll keep him in our thoughts tomorrow, I'm sure! Be well, Plushy!

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    I have a ton of respect for Plushenko and would love to see him go out with a great performance. But reading about all his health issues, and now this surgery, I really wish he'd call an end to his competitive career. He has nothing left to prove to anyone and he's risking his long-term health; I'd hate to see him face the possible consequences of that. I really do feel that he should call it a day and perform in shows instead, so that his many fans can continue to enjoy his skating.
    Yes. Agreed.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
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    I feel the same. I just hope the doctors and his team are more aware of the situation than us and have informed him too. It looks like a non serious operation for normal people, but for athletes I have no idea..It is scary not to walk for a month, I dont know how he will manage to surpass the psysical pain but on top of all I m really buffled where he finds the mental strength to start from the zero every time sth like this happens. It must be frustrating for him that his best condition was during the autumn. All I wish is that everything goes by his plan.

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    He's mentally extremely strong. Of course, he would have had to have been to achieve all he has - and gone through all he has. But it never ceases to impress me.

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    After non serious operation people are normally not in the condition not to walk for a month. I am not sure if journalists put it right. I trust only the video interview of Mishin. And there he didn't say anything like that. Google says that after this type of surgery patients can walk in a few hours and are usually discharged from the hospital in 2-4 days.

    Just to refresh people' s memory. Daisuke couldn't walk for more than a day after his knee surgery in 2008. He was in hospital for two months and in reabilitation for months. Only in April, i.e. after 6 month from his October injury he returned to the rink, resumed jumps in June 2009. Few months later in Feb 2010 he won an Olympic medal. I am sure Plu is not a lesser tough guy.

  8. #98
    Custom Title plushyfan's Avatar
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    It's Plushy's surgery http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5hQl...ature=youtu.be

    Too scary!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmyers View Post
    Plushenko did get level 4 spins and steps. When he gets level 4 spins and steps it is not considered good but when others do it is. You don't like the spins but they got the highest scores he fulfilled all the requirements to get the high scores. You don't like the way they look so you call him horrible and spins and steps? LOL. No he is the best of all time and actually all 3 competing now are not up to his level in cosistency or titles.

    It's not hard for most junior skaters to get level 4's on their spins. Whether it's executed well is a different story. I think sometimes Plushenko has executed fast spins though the positions aren't very attractive or creative. As far as donut spins, many male skaters are doing them... as far as Biellmanns, Plushenko has one of the worst Biellmanns I've ever seen executed. Looks incredibly strained. Hanyu's is much better and probably one of the best male Biellmanns I've seen, even if Plushenko was popular for being one of the only ones to do it during his time.

    Sorry, I should clarify... by best "technical skater", I meant consistent jumping. And yes, spins are important too, but to me, what truly makes the best competitive figure skaters are those who perform hardest jumps the most consistently. I would call Goebel a one of the best jumpers too, even though the rest of his season is relatively mediocre. I would agree that arguably overall Yagudin is the best total package skater in terms of jump consistency, decent spins, good footwork.
    Last edited by CanadianSkaterGuy; 01-30-2013 at 05:38 PM.

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    Also, regarding his footwork, Plushenko has some of the best feet around and can skate with deep edges and difficult turns. It's a travesty he rarely applies this to the rest of his program. While he has some of the best feet around, everything from the waist up (or knees up when he happens to hip-thrust) looks frantic, flailing and frankly, ruins the footwork.

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    I know you don't like his choice of doing a.lot of upper body movement while doing footwork and it would be better and more proper if he was far more limited but that is what it is decided to best express the program and to get levels that require full body movement and not be like empty from waste up.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianSkaterGuy View Post
    It's not hard for most junior skaters to get level 4's on their spins. Whether it's executed well is a different story. I think sometimes Plushenko has executed fast spins though the positions aren't very attractive or creative. As far as donut spins, many male skaters are doing them... as far as Biellmanns, Plushenko has one of the worst Biellmanns I've ever seen executed. Looks incredibly strained. Hanyu's is much better and probably one of the best male Biellmanns I've seen, even if Plushenko was popular for being one of the only ones to do it during his time.

    Sorry, I should clarify... by best "technical skater", I meant consistent jumping. And yes, spins are important too, but to me, what truly makes the best competitive figure skaters are those who perform hardest jumps the most consistently. I would call Goebel a one of the best jumpers too, even though the rest of his season is relatively mediocre. I would agree that arguably overall Yagudin is the best total package skater in terms of jump consistency, decent spins, good footwork.
    It's bored to see North Americans say "Yagudin is better than Plushenko and he is total package blah-blah-blah". I want him to show not-Level 1 or 2 spins and steps someday under NJS.

  13. #103
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    Yagudin had excellent centering on his spins, and a variety of positions and never had problems exceeding 8 rotations in basic positions (particularly his sit). He certainly doesn't have the variety of say Lambiel or Chan, but he would easily be able to do level 3 and 4 spins.

    Quote Originally Posted by gmyers View Post
    I know you don't like his choice of doing a.lot of upper body movement while doing footwork and it would be better and more proper if he was far more limited but that is what it is decided to best express the program and to get levels that require full body movement and not be like empty from waste up.
    I think my issue with his excessive movement is that it doesn't match the rest of his program. He skates most of the program with few arm movements because he's focusing on his jump layout, but then all of a sudden it's like "Oh, it's my footwork sequence, better amp up the energy and go nuts!" and it looks very jarring. More restraint in his footwork arm movements would highlight the difficulty that his feet are doing and then adding less mechanical more meaningful arm movements in the rest of his program would help the whole program look more balanced. There's a reason why many say his programs are so formulaic, because often they are just a slew of jumps followed by an intense period of footwork near the end. Only recently has he actually been paying more attention to more balanced choreography.

    Level 4 footwork that requires full body movement doesn't mean flailing otherwise people would just do jumping jacks in the middle of their footwork ("Hey look, all my limbs are moving, give me a level 4!")... there are plenty of skaters with more subtlety in their movements that obtain Level 4 without the flailing and hip thrusts (Chan, Abbott, Suzuki, and Kostner are great examples). Also, how exactly do hip thrusts express the slew of programs he's happened to incorporate them in? I know they are intended to play to the crowd but they're distracting and rather clownish.
    Last edited by CanadianSkaterGuy; 01-30-2013 at 07:16 PM.

  14. #104
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    Yagudin's skills were made for COP i think. He didn't have a major weakness.

  15. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianSkaterGuy View Post
    Yagudin had excellent centering on his spins, and a variety of positions and never had problems exceeding 8 rotations in basic positions (particularly his sit). He certainly doesn't have the variety of say Lambiel or Chan, but he would easily be able to do level 3 and 4 spins.

    I think my issue with his excessive movement is that it doesn't match the rest of his program. He skates most of the program with few arm movements because he's focusing on his jump layout, but then all of a sudden it's like "Oh, it's my footwork sequence, better amp up the energy and go nuts!" and it looks very jarring. More restraint in his footwork arm movements would highlight the difficulty that his feet are doing and then adding less mechanical more meaningful arm movements in the rest of his program would help the whole program look more balanced. There's a reason why many say his programs are so formulaic, because often they are just a slew of jumps followed by an intense period of footwork near the end. Only recently has he actually been paying more attention to more balanced choreography.

    Level 4 footwork that requires full body movement doesn't mean flailing otherwise people would just do jumping jacks in the middle of their footwork ("Hey look, all my limbs are moving, give me a level 4!")... there are plenty of skaters with more subtlety in their movements that obtain Level 4 without the flailing and hip thrusts (Chan, Abbott, Suzuki, and Kostner are great examples). Also, how exactly do hip thrusts express the slew of programs he's happened to incorporate them in? I know they are intended to play to the crowd but they're distracting and rather clownish.
    If a skater wants to be themselves and not only play to the judges but also the crowds which may contain a lot of their paying fans they may do moves that fans like while also paying attention to the judges and scoring system and judge and technical panels. The idea that a skater should do only one kind of thing to choreograph A step sequence or whole program to best be cop is why so many don't like it I think. Like "it must be subtle!" "no hip movements!" why? Let them all express themselves and get the points If they can. I think you are very close to describing a type of program all skaters must be mandated to do as their "free" program lol!

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