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Thread: Need help with camel spin

  1. #1
    Rinkside
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    Apr 2013
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    Need help with camel spin

    Currently I can only do about 3 or 4 revolutions and they're usually pretty slow. A lot of times when I enter the spin I go up on the toepick and fall out of it. I need advice for how to to do a better camel spin. Thanks!

    Just out of curiosity, which spin was more difficult for you to learn: camel or sit spin?

  2. #2
    Sitting Here on Blue Jay Way silver.blades's Avatar
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    I can't say for sure without seeing it, but it sounds like the timing of your knee is off. After you bend to initiate the spin, don't jerk it up. You need a more gradual, but steady rising in the knee as you spiral the edge. The knee should be straight once you enter the spin proper. Keep pressure on the skating side shoulder to keep the spin going. General tips for strengthening the spin once you're in in: practice the position, the stronger it is the easier it is to keep momentum. Stretch everything out. This will help to strengthen the position and stabilize. Remember spinning is not a passive skill. Every muscle should be working. When you enter the spin keep your upper body parallel with the ice. This will help get you into the position faster.

    I don't remember learning either spin. But the sit took me longer to perfect and the camel is less consistent, but it's my favourite one.

  3. #3
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
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    Camel took me longer and it's been inconsistent until this past year (where when nervous, I'd blow it entirely). The thing that really helped me was staying "open, square" on the entry (instead of a big wind up) so that the skating arm had a short distance of travel and to not rise in the knee until the skating arm has finished it's travel completely into it's open and up position. I hit every single camel spin this season in competition, so this method has worked well for me.

  4. #4
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    Camel spins are harder than sit spins because you really need to let the edge come around before hooking the spin. The deeper you bend your skating knee as you push off onto the entrance edge, the less likely you are to hit your toepick and kill the spin (another thing that will kill it is forgetting to keep your leading shoulder high and chin up). Think of going in with the same amount of knee bend as a sit spin, and don't straighten your skating leg until you feel like you've done a full circle on the entrance edge.

  5. #5
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    I'm exactly the same, and find the sit spin soooo much easier!
    When you go into it, make sure you get a good knee bend and when in the camel position stack your hips side ways instead of straight on. Use your arms on the entry too and get good speed going into it. Lift your toes up in your skate and press down on the ball of your feet at all times to help with the toepick problem! Good luck

  6. #6
    Rinkside
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    You want a really deep knee bend on that outside edge, and hold the edge until you've completed a circle. Gradually rise up, keeping on the ball of you're foot. Make sure you stay on the ball of your foot and keep your head steady. Practise your spiral as well, and get more comfortable with that. Also, don't overthink it- just let it come naturally!

    I personally found my camel easier than my sit. Dunno why...

  7. #7
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    I find camels to be much harder. You can even see it in elite skaters who much harder it is to maintain in terms of speed and rotation than a sit (it's physics... with a sit spin, your body is more compact to it's easier to rotate). When I don't think about my camel, I find I execute it better. But yeah, you have to be patient when rising in your knee. Eventually you'll get the timing down and it'll be easier.

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