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Thread: Why do so many skaters seem to have «Fake personalities» on the ice ?

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    Why do so many skaters seem to have «Fake personalities» on the ice ?

    I'm just wondering this,

    Why so many skaters seems to have «Fake personality» on the ice ?

    For example, I find that Sasha Cohen have a real personnality on the ice and is not fake because it look completely natural when she skate and placed herself with her starting position in competition. like this : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94TgJGnuypQ (What I see his a real person who doesn't need to put her hands up for the audience, and I think it's perfect like this, why to have a fake smile always and look at the audience for presenting ?, like Joannie Rochette for example : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MINh6RMsGpk
    I admire Rochette skating but to me, she is a robot, to me she doesn't show her personnality at all, she looks «Fake» even if she is a wonderful athlete and skater.

    Is it me or it is more beautiful when we see a skater who doesn't force their movements and let go their personnality.

    I find it sad that Mirai Nagasu for example, change her personnality in her skating after 2011, she doesn't look herself anymore like in 2010 Olympic, she have a wonderful sparking personnality that I find it sad that she try to doesn't be herself.

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    Six Point Zero Krislite's Avatar
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    First of all, what is this concept of "personality on the ice" that you speak of?

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboogie22 View Post
    I'm just wondering this,

    Why so many skaters seems to have «Fake personality» on the ice ?

    For example, I find that Sasha Cohen have a real personnality on the ice and is not fake because it look completely natural when she skate and placed herself with her starting position in competition. like this : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94TgJGnuypQ (What I see his a real person who doesn't need to put her hands up for the audience, and I think it's perfect like this, why to have a fake smile always and look at the audience for presenting ?, like Joannie Rochette for example : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MINh6RMsGpk
    I admire Rochette skating but to me, she is a robot, to me she doesn't show her personnality at all, she looks «Fake» even if she is a wonderful athlete and skater.

    Is it me or it is more beautiful when we see a skater who doesn't force their movements and let go their personnality.

    I find it sad that Mirai Nagasu for example, change her personnality in her skating after 2011, she doesn't look herself anymore like in 2010 Olympic, she have a wonderful sparking personnality that I find it sad that she try to doesn't be herself.

    I get what you are saying but its not nice to accuse people of being fake. To accuse someone of being fake is a big bold claim.
    If a person is genuinely happy to be on the ice competing, and is by nature kind, warm and likeable it doesn't necessarily mean that they are fake. Not everyone can have the spunk and sass of Sasha Cohen, or even a Scott Moir.
    Also, skating is a performance and being curteous to the audience by smiling and waving is a part of performing. Audiences are there to support the athlete and showing apprecieation by waving and smiling is quite appropriate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krislite View Post
    First of all, what is this concept of "personality on the ice" that you speak of?
    What I means is that I think that a personality on the ice should be just like outside of skating. I see that Sasha Cohen for example is very herself because in and out the ice she looks the same.

    But, for some reason, I don't understand that somes skaters feel obliged to act like every skaters and always smile even when they do not feel happy necessary in their program. For example, we can see that Alissa Czisny smile the whole times in a lot of her program. In this way, I think many skaters did not look natural. It is impossible that Alissa Czisny is always happy espacially like her performance at 2012 worlds, poor girl, I wish at this times that she lets her emotions out and shows more her personality, instead of acting like a princess of crest whitestrips.

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    Six Point Zero Krislite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboogie22 View Post
    What I means is that I think that a personality on the ice should be just like outside of skating. I see that Sasha Cohen for example is very herself because in and out the ice she looks the same.

    But, for some reason, I don't understand that somes skaters feel obliged to act like every skaters and always smile even when they do not feel happy necessary in their program. For example, we can see that Alissa Czisny smile the whole times in a lot of her program. In this way, I think many skaters did not look natural. It is impossible that Alissa Czisny is always happy espacially like her performance at 2012 worlds, poor girl, I wish at this times that she lets her emotions out and shows more her personality, instead of acting like a princess of crest whitestrips.
    I'm still not sure what you're getting at. Are your referring to poor acting skills? Some programs require a bit of acting (at least in terms of facial expressions), and not all skaters can pull it off, especially when they're spinning and jumping at the same time.

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    Also, very young and inexperienced skaters might not have developed the performance skills or the ease under pressure that a competitive skating program requires. Some people never develop this ease. I don't think that makes them fake. They just perform differently. Some skaters have a charisma that makes their every move utterly convincing. But that's not a universal trait. As for people who smile while they're skating, they may feel that this is a way of projecting emotion. Or maybe smiling helps them focus their concentration on their efforts.

    It's interesting that you mention Sasha Cohen. I seem to recall that at one point early in her career, many people considered that she didn't project sufficient emotion. These people found her rather remote and aloof. I disagree with them, of course, but it goes to show that interpreting a skater's performance can be very subjective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GF2445 View Post
    I get what you are saying but its not nice to accuse people of being fake. To accuse someone of being fake is a big bold claim.
    If a person is genuinely happy to be on the ice competing, and is by nature kind, warm and likeable it doesn't necessarily mean that they are fake. Not everyone can have the spunk and sass of Sasha Cohen, or even a Scott Moir.
    Also, skating is a performance and being curteous to the audience by smiling and waving is a part of performing. Audiences are there to support the athlete and showing apprecieation by waving and smiling is quite appropriate.
    Yes, you have understand what I was saying I just find that it marvelous when the skaters make herself acting in their skating with their real personality, like you said Scott Moir is a good example and Evgueni Plushenko also look himself on the ice. I just wish that more skaters stop to make the same entrance before their starting position into the solo, this should not be mandatory or be to the discretion of the skaters.

    And, I wish that the skater doesn't feel necessary to smile in the program when they don't want, we are one of the only sport in the world that the athlete act like that. I think that we can enjoy a person without a smile.

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    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Alissa Czizny isn't phony. She smiles like that all the time, on ice or off.

    Jamie Sale and David Pelletier actually did get an ad for Crest Whitestrips. And Rachael Flatt was the spokesperson for red, white and blue braces for the American Orthodontics Association, in honor of the Olympics.

    It's performance art. Stage actors, opera singers, jugglers -- they all put on phony emotions as part of their craft.

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    🌸🐱❄🐱❄🐱🌸 jennyanydots's Avatar
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    Kind of an odd topic. In a sport that involves judged performances, politicking and sponsorships, I would think that it would be in your best interest to put your best face forward. It's also a matter of good sportsmanship and showing appreciation to the audience. You mentioned Alissa Czisny. Would you have preferred that she bawled and scowled her way through her 2012 worlds performance and then stomp off the ice to throw a tantrum in the kiss&cry? I think it was quite admirable of her that aside from the jumps she performed her programs beautifully, which was crucial in salvaging as many points as possible so that the U.S. ladies wouldn't be down to one worlds spot the following year. I don't see why that should be considered fake. It probably does seem impossible for Alissa to be that smiley and nice, but according to people who do personally know her it's all real and I believe it. Also instances like Yuna Kim's reaction to her 2013 worlds SP score or Gracie Gold's reaction to her second place finish at nationals, although honest, have been criticized as poor sportsmanship and have even turned off some fans. In the past Sasha Cohen has been criticized for giving too much sass and more recently Patrick Chan seems to be rather media challenged. So while being honest and real is theoretically good, skaters do need to use some discretion with what they display for public view.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jennyanydots View Post
    Kind of an odd topic. In a sport that involves judged performances, politicking and sponsorships, I would think that it would be in your best interest to put your best face forward. It's also a matter of good sportsmanship and showing appreciation to the audience. You mentioned Alissa Czisny. Would you have preferred that she bawled and scowled her way through her 2012 worlds performance and then stomp off the ice to throw a tantrum in the kiss&cry? I think it was quite admirable of her that aside from the jumps she performed her programs beautifully, which was crucial in salvaging as many points as possible so that the U.S. ladies wouldn't be down to one worlds spot the following year. I don't see why that should be considered fake. It probably does seem impossible for Alissa to be that smiley and nice, but according to people who do personally know her it's all real and I believe it. Also instances like Yuna Kim's reaction to her 2013 worlds SP score or Gracie Gold's reaction to her second place finish at nationals, although honest, have been criticized as poor sportsmanship and have even turned off some fans. In the past Sasha Cohen has been criticized for giving too much sass and more recently Patrick Chan seems to be rather media challenged. So while being honest and real is theoretically good, skaters do need to use some discretion with what they display for public view.
    That's the point, I don't think that it was bad the Yu-Na reaction at the kiss&Cry 2013 SP world and the reaction of Gracie finishing second was natural also. I like when the skater have a real expression instead of acting like they are others person. I don't consider this as poor sportsmanship. It's just being herself!

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    Turned off what fans? Never even heard of that

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    What I means is that I think that a personality on the ice should be just like outside of skating. 
    Why? Figure skating routines are performances. Do you also think that all other performers (e.g. actors, singers, etc.) should be just like their on-stage personas?

    Many performers are actually introverts in real life, but being an introvert on stage won't fly. I don't see a problem with that. Most people aren't the same in every single situation.

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    Custom Title Cherryy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboogie22 View Post
    That's the point, I don't think that it was bad the Yu-Na reaction at the kiss&Cry 2013 SP world and the reaction of Gracie finishing second was natural also. I like when the skater have a real expression instead of acting like they are others person. I don't consider this as poor sportsmanship. It's just being herself!
    Then you surely have nothing against some of Scott's and Patrick's statements, right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherryy View Post
    Then you surely have nothing against some of Scott's and Patrick's statements, right?
    Indeed, I have nothing against Patrick's and Scott comments.
    In life, you can not please everyone and I think it is correct that they have the courage to be themselves and say what they want depending on the situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboogie22 View Post
    Indeed, I have nothing against Patrick's and Scott comments.
    In life, you can not please everyone and I think it is correct that they have the courage to be themselves and say what they want depending on the situation.
    I don't agree. Intelligent and well rounded people find a balance. It's a little something called tact. Many are too polite and seem rehearsed or fake, while others have to say something every time something doesn't sit right with them. That's called snotty.

    As far as the fake personality on the ice idea. I just don't get it. Most programs have somewhat of a theme or character. The skater is trying to skate to the music, and I doubt their mindset is always totally in tandem with their program, especially when having to land triple jumps. Whether you realize it or not, many skaters are quite nervous whenever they take the ice, even the most seasoned competitors. Should they all look wild eyed or scared whenever they take the ice? No. The skater smiles to acknowledge the crowd, and then takes a deep breath to settle in. If you really think Sasha Cohen was never "faking" it, you're dead wrong. Watch her 2003 World Championships long program. During the spiral sequence, look at her face and into her eyes, and listen to what Dick Button is saying. He's dead right.

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