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Thread: Makarov family become US citizens

  1. #1
    Keepin' it real gsk8's Avatar
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    News Makarov family become US citizens

    The Makarov family — Olympic bronze medalists Oleg and Lorisa, and top-ranked daughter Ksenia — were among 154 immigrants who became naturalized American citizens at a swearing-in ceremony Friday.

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  2. #2
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    I thought Ksenia was already a US citizen?

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    Custom Title FSGMT's Avatar
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    "She has an eye on 2018": interesting... I hope she'll represent the US, though: the field in Russia will be really tougher!

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    Congratulations to them. Given how long the family has been in the US, I was surprised that they were not already US citizens. Was kind of struck by the timing of this decision. Changing "allegiance" from a citizenship standpoint just on the cusp of the ultimate year in which Russia has been providing very significant monetary support to their skaters, financial incentives to coaches, etc. Also simultaneous to a relatively high profile time of US/Russia tensions (Obama canceling his Summit related one on one meeting with Putin), the Anti-Gay law debacle, Snowden sanctuary controversy, etc. Wonder why they thought it was a good time now, and not in 6 months when a lot of issues have quieted down - both in terms of doing what they did, and seeking publicity for their decision (involving the media). Just curious.

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    They had to have applied for citizenship years ago. It just happens that it went through now (i.e., that they took the oath).

    Now it becomes clear why Ksenia started out skating for Russia. She couldn't skate for the US because she wasn't a US citizen, and anyway, she hadn't made it to Nationals since her Novice years. She skated for Russia at a time when there wasn't much competition there at the Senior level, and she did well. But once the wunderkinder moved up to Seniors, her days as a top Russian skater were numbered.

    Who knows what her next move will be. At least now there is another option at her disposal----skating for the US. Of course RFSF could refuse to release her, but since she is now a US citizen, Ksenia could appeal to the ISU on that basis.

  6. #6
    Tripping on the Podium Maxi's Avatar
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    This is great news! I am happy for them and I think changing to the US training style might actually help her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckm View Post
    They had to have applied for citizenship years ago. It just happens that it went through now (i.e., that they took the oath).

    Now it becomes clear why Ksenia started out skating for Russia. She couldn't skate for the US because she wasn't a US citizen, and anyway, she hadn't made it to Nationals since her Novice years. She skated for Russia at a time when there wasn't much competition there at the Senior level, and she did well. But once the wunderkinder moved up to Seniors, her days as a top Russian skater were numbered.

    Who knows what her next move will be. At least now there is another option at her disposal----skating for the US. Of course RFSF could refuse to release her, but since she is now a US citizen, Ksenia could appeal to the ISU on that basis.
    Just because she wasn't a citizen didn't mean she couldn't skate for the US. Tanith Belbin skated for years as a Canadian until she finally became a US citizen. Not being a citizen just meant that she couldn't go to the Olympics for the US.

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    The ISU citizenship requirements for pairs and dance are different from those for singles skaters. In pairs and dance, only ONE of the partners must be a citizen of the country for which they skate. Tanith wasn't a US citizen, but Ben Agosto was. IOC rules require that both partners be citizens of the country they represent, so that Tanith couldn't skate at the 2002 Olympics. She finally got her citizenship in time for the 2006 Olympics.

    ISU and IOC rules require that a single skater be a citizen of the country he/she represents.

  9. #9
    EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA CaroLiza_fan's Avatar
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    Although I can understand why Oleg and the family did this (well, they’ve been based in the US for years and, with Russia having a conveyor belt of good young skaters, Ksenia doesn’t have much hope of getting back on the Russian team), I am surprised with this development.

    After everything the Makarovs have done for figure skating in Russia, I am surprised that they are taking US citizenship. Plus, there is no guarantee of Ksenia getting on the American team.

    But, it’s worth a try

    CaroLiza_fan

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaroLiza_fan View Post
    Although I can understand why Oleg and the family did this (well, they’ve been based in the US for years and, with Russia having a conveyor belt of good young skaters, Ksenia doesn’t have much hope of getting back on the Russian team), I am surprised with this development.

    After everything the Makarovs have done for figure skating in Russia, I am surprised that they are taking US citizenship. Plus, there is no guarantee of Ksenia getting on the American team.

    But, it’s worth a try

    CaroLiza_fan
    Maybe they just like it better here then in Russia.

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