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Thread: Sonja Henie as a skater

  1. #16
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Yes, ILT, I agree. And it's especially significant that she was Norwegian. For someone from Norway to express such things must have been such a slap in the face to the country. Kind of like the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, with their clueless "friendship" with that foul crew. What did they care about what the Reich did to the little people?

    I hadn't remembered any of this about Henie. I found it out when I was looking stuff up after Mathman's post. It's sitting right there in Wiki. I know that Americans tend to be amnesiac about stuff like that (except for some reason with Jane Fonda), but I wonder what the sentiment about her was in Norway after the War.
    Nazi Germany was on the otherside of the Atlantic. Jane Fonda's continued attack on Americans who fought and served (and were injured or killed) is WAY closer to home. (Not saying those that were victims of the Nazis are lesser in some way, just giving an idea of why Fonda is seemingly less liked, though I don't agree with the picture that we somehow ignore the Holocaust just because those of us who can't stand that "woman" aren't showing our dislike of Nazis?)

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I imagine that this was a woman who could never bring herself to say that she was wrong about anything.
    Isn´t that rather difficult for lots and lots of people, ?

  3. #18
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    I think that the Holocaust resonates more for people who are older and particularly for those who were raised in the U.K. or Europe. Jane Fonda was more recent and probably of more interest to those in the U. S.

    On a slight tangent, if you want to see a story of real self-absorption, check out Wikipedia for Leni Riefenstahl. Years ago, I saw a documentary on her (a film maker who did Triumph of the Will, a Nazi propaganda film for Hitler). This woman lived to 101, was the most self-absorbed human I have ever seen. She'd make Sonia Henie look like Mother Teresa.

  4. #19
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    It's funny, Scruff; Riefenstahl is the one who crossed my mind when we started talking about Henie's Nazi sympathies. Riefenstahl was really in the thick of it, right there in prewar and wartime Germany. She was attracted to Hitler and his ideas right at the beginning, in the early 1930s. I forgot she lived that long. Interestingly, long after the War, she worked with the Nuba people of Sudan, doing still photographs of them. So maybe the idea of Aryan superiority wasn't a complete obsession with her.

    Amazing fact: I just looked her up in Wiki, and she worked for Greenpeace for a few years.

  5. #20
    Outdated Old Dinosaur
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    My "favorite" Nazi sympathizer was Charles Lindberg, American hero.

    Of course, after America entered the war, he changed his tune... but some of his early statements in support of Hitler were shocking.

  6. #21
    ~ Figure Skating Is My Passion ~ Ladskater's Avatar
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    I look at Sonja Henie as the first lady of Figure Skating. She may have been "primitive" as you point out, but she basically put figure skating on the map for the general public. She was a great competitor and she genuinely loved to skate. I read that her private life was not that happy, but she was always happiest on the ice - like the rest of us fellow figure skaters can relate. She made figure skating popular through her movies. One can't fairly compare Sonja's style of skating to today's skaters because figure skating has evolved so much over the years. In Sonja's days the emphasis was on tracing figures. Sonja Henie influenced a lot of little girls to take up figure skating - she even had a doll made in her honour. I would love to have a time machine to see the likes of Sonja Henie skate live!

  7. #22
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    Yeah, getting back to my original question, Henie was a skating pathfinder, and I am especially interested in what has evolved from her day and what hasn't. Of course the jumps are better, but that goes without saying. The posture issue is the one that surprised me the most, because if you look at film dancing of the time, posture and carriage were just as important to people such as Eleanor Powell and Ginger Rogers as it is to dancers of today. This was true even though I'm pretty sure that the tap and ballroom dancers of the time did not generally have ballet training. (A notable exception is Eleanor Powell.) Of course, later MGM musical stars did include some ballet-trained dancers, especially Leslie Caron and Cyd Charisse.

    What I really want to know and can't tell for myself is whether Henie's bladework is superior compared to today. I would assume so because school figures were so important.

  8. #23
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    There is a very interesting thread at FSU: "Retrospective on the 1936 Olympics" which adds a lot to what we have here on Henie.

  9. #24
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    Thanks, Scrufflet! I'll have to check it out. Interesting: of course in those years, winter and summer Games were held in the same year. And in 1936, both of them were in Germany. In 1940, both were supposed to be in Japan, Germany's ally in World War II. Germany's other ally, Italy, was the planned host for the winter Games of 1944, in Cortina d'Ampezzo (eventually the host for the 1956 winter event.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...es_host_cities

    I dug around at the above site, and I realized that before World War II, it wasn't unheard-of for the same country to host both summer and winter Games. The U.S. was the host country for both of the 1932 Games, and France was the host country for both 1924 Games. I don't think that doubling up was either politically or financially feasible after 1945.

  10. #25
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    The FSU thread is in the Trash Can part of the forum.

  11. #26
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    Thanks, Doris! I've been hunting fruitlessly.

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