Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Big Foot

  1. #1
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,663

    Big Foot

    Scientists (actually a veterinarian in Texas) prove that Big Foot exists.

    http://atlantablackstar.com/2013/10/...gfoot-is-real/

    This is patent nonsense. Everyone knows that Sasquatches live in Washington State and British Columbia, not Kentucky. Plus, the Sasquatch-Yeti line diverged from the line that led to anatomically modern man some 500,000 years ago, not 13,000 years ago as these charlatans allege. If you want to know the real dope, buy my book.

  2. #2
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Very funny, Math!

    Maybe the kind that lives in Kentucky is only MediumFoot, an offshoot species.

  3. #3
    Custom Title merrywidow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    9,411
    I tho't there were some living in a forest in northern California? Doesn't Florida lay claim to some kind of hairy, upright, animal/man too?

  4. #4
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Spokane
    Posts
    1,460
    This is soooooo funny! Remember how Space ship sightings went away when digital video cams came out?
    Now all we get is these lame vids of Bigfoot!

    I have hiked and camped thoughout WA state and Oregon for years, I made my living driving forest roads to remote radio sites on mountain tops....if there really was a viable species that big,
    1. Someone would have shot one, accidently or on purpose
    2. It would have been hit by a car
    3. There really is no big uncharted hunks of forest here for it to hide in. You can drive on forest roads or hike on trails about anywhere and many do. Aint no bigfoot.
    you have a better chance of seeing an ivory billed wood pecker and their aint none of those either.....LOL!
    (If there WAS a bigfoot, he would have better luck hiding in those 78,000 empty buildings in Detroit than in WA state)
    I wonder if Kentucky is trying to steal our myths????? What's next? Taking away our "Twilight" Forks, WA vampires? Honest Politicians?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Scientists (actually a veterinarian in Texas) prove that Big Foot exists.

    http://atlantablackstar.com/2013/10/...gfoot-is-real/

    This is patent nonsense. Everyone knows that Sasquatches live in Washington State and British Columbia, not Kentucky. Plus, the Sasquatch-Yeti line diverged from the line that led to anatomically modern man some 500,000 years ago, not 13,000 years ago as these charlatans allege. If you want to know the real dope, buy my book.

  5. #5
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post

    (If there WAS a bigfoot, he would have better luck hiding in those 78,000 empty buildings in Detroit than in WA state)
    I wonder if Kentucky is trying to steal our myths????? What's next? Taking away our "Twilight" Forks, WA vampires? Honest Politicians?
    And then there are all the satellite cameras that can see every square inch of the Earth's surface from space.

  6. #6
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,663
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    I have hiked and camped thoughout WA state and Oregon for years, I made my living driving forest roads to remote radio sites on mountain tops...
    Over the summer I was visiting Spokane, and my sister had found an old county map from 19-oh-something that marked the homesteads of my great grandparents on Mica Peak. In those days you took the train from Spokane, got off at Bell's store (near Rockford), and went up the side of the mountain on horseback. So we hiked around for a while, got turned back at the road that led to the government radar installation on the mountaintop, and I don't know if we ever found the right spot or not. Both families lost their timber farms in the depression.

    When my grandfather was courting my grandmother, she lived in Avery Idaho. The only way to get to Avery was to ride the public barge to the southern end of Lake Coeur d'Alene, then pole a raft up the Saint Joe river.

  7. #7
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Over the summer I was visiting Spokane, and my sister had found an old county map from 19-oh-something that marked the homesteads of my great grandparents on Mica Peak. In those days you took the train from Spokane, got off at Bell's store (near Rockford), and went up the side of the mountain on horseback. So we hiked around for a while, got turned back at the road that led to the government radar installation on the mountaintop, and I don't know if we ever found the right spot or not. Both families lost their timber farms in the depression.

    When my grandfather was courting my grandmother, she lived in Avery Idaho. The only way to get to Avery was to ride the public barge to the southern end of Lake Coeur d'Alene, then pole a raft up the Saint Joe river.
    Wow, what neat stories from you and Chris! Much more interesting than sasquatches, in my opinion.

  8. #8
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,663
    ^ Actually, the most interesting thing (to me) that I learned on this particular trip was that my great grandfather wasn't my great grandfather. Jens Olsen immigrated from Norway to the United States, leaving his fiancé behind. The plan was that after he established himself in the new world he would send for her.

    It took a little longer than Jens expected. He worked at various jobs in Minnesota, but it didn't work out. Finally he moved to eastern Washington, where the timber industry was booming and any man strong enough to cut down trees all day long could make a go of it. Five years after he left Norway, Jens wrote to his beloved and sent her the money for passage.

    Well, five years is a long time. When the ship embarked from Trondheim the passenger list read: Anna Hansdottir and Carrie Leifsdottir (infant). When the ship docked in New York the passenger list read Anna Hansdottir and Carrie Jensdottir (infant). Jens and Anna had four more children and lived happily ever after.

  9. #9
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    That certainly speaks well for Jens Olsen! A large-hearted man.

    Have you ever seen the movie Hester Street? It's a modest little film that dealt with another common problem of the immigration pattern where the guy comes over first and then sends for the family years later. A Jewish man, Yankel, has gone to New York from Russia (Hester Street is a location on the Lower East Side, where a lot of immigrants first lived) and become Americanized. His traditional wife and their son arrive. While she navigates the changes and decides which ones to adopt (including uncovering her head "like a Gentile woman"), Yankel, now Jake, has found a more forward-thinking lady and wants a divorce. Probably the best-known performer in this authentic-feeling little movie is Carol Kane, who plays Jake's young wife Gitl. A lot hinges on her choices. I'm always in awe of the path that generation took, in all the cultures that came here. More often than not, families had to separate for years at a time. Sometimes the wife arrived with someone like Carrie Leifsdottir, or the husband met her at the pier with a story of his own. Sometimes the pair of them managed to wait and reunite, and there's a gap in the children's years of birth (that's what happened in my family on my mother's side). All of these families had to learn a new language, sometimes one that was in a new alphabet. In those days of tough travel, they had to assume that they'd never see their old homeland or other relatives again. I know I could never be that brave.

  10. #10
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Spokane
    Posts
    1,460
    Mica Peak was one of my radio sites before I retired from the state patrol 9 years ago....from the inside you can still see the marking of a USAF installation but now I think the radar is used for more peaceful things if it is still active. Just a few miles to the west is our 1,000 yard shooting range My wife and I chose the Spokane area over 3 other western areas to live...boy did we chose well! Went with two friends on a motorcycle ride to Lake Pend Oreille and had lunch yesterday....a bit of snow on the higher peaks now...Now if I could just get Internet more than 1/2 hour a day!
    Chris churning butter or something in the 1990s
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Over the summer I was visiting Spokane, and my sister had found an old county map from 19-oh-something that marked the homesteads of my great grandparents on Mica Peak. In those days you took the train from Spokane, got off at Bell's store (near Rockford), and went up the side of the mountain on horseback. So we hiked around for a while, got turned back at the road that led to the government radar installation on the mountaintop, and I don't know if we ever found the right spot or not. Both families lost their timber farms in the depression.

    When my grandfather was courting my grandmother, she lived in Avery Idaho. The only way to get to Avery was to ride the public barge to the southern end of Lake Coeur d'Alene, then pole a raft up the Saint Joe river.

  11. #11
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Spokane
    Posts
    1,460
    (Lake Pend Oreille on a ride last year...one of our favorite places to day ride to.....No Big Foot sightings yet! )

  12. #12
    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Spokane
    Posts
    1,460
    Wow...that's quite a story! One wonders when and how Jens found out his fiancé had a child in his absence. At least they picked a great place to live....
    Its kind of erie cause one hour ago I just finished watching the re-make of the movie "Alfie" that had a similar plotline.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    ^ Actually, the most interesting thing (to me) that I learned on this particular trip was that my great grandfather wasn't my great grandfather. Jens Olsen immigrated from Norway to the United States, leaving his fiancé behind. The plan was that after he established himself in the new world he would send for her.

    It took a little longer than Jens expected. He worked at various jobs in Minnesota, but it didn't work out. Finally he moved to eastern Washington, where the timber industry was booming and any man strong enough to cut down trees all day long could make a go of it. Five years after he left Norway, Jens wrote to his beloved and sent her the money for passage.

    Well, five years is a long time. When the ship embarked from Trondheim the passenger list read: Anna Hansdottir and Carrie Leifsdottir (infant). When the ship docked in New York the passenger list read Anna Hansdottir and Carrie Jensdottir (infant). Jens and Anna had four more children and lived happily ever after.

  13. #13
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    (Lake Pend Oreille on a ride last year...one of our favorite places to day ride to.....No Big Foot sightings yet! )
    Man, Chris, that is Scenery with a capital S.

  14. #14
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    28,663
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    Have you ever seen the movie Hester Street? It's a modest little film that dealt with another common problem of the immigration pattern where the guy comes over first and then sends for the family years later. A Jewish man, Yankel, has gone to New York from Russia (Hester Street is a location on the Lower East Side, where a lot of immigrants first lived) and become Americanized. His traditional wife and their son arrive. While she navigates the changes and decides which ones to adopt (including uncovering her head "like a Gentile woman"), Yankel, now Jake, has found a more forward-thinking lady and wants a divorce. Probably the best-known performer in this authentic-feeling little movie is Carol Kane, who plays Jake's young wife Gitl. A lot hinges on her choices. I'm always in awe of the path that generation took, in all the cultures that came here. More often than not, families had to separate for years at a time. Sometimes the wife arrived with someone like Carrie Leifsdottir, or the husband met her at the pier with a story of his own. Sometimes the pair of them managed to wait and reunite, and there's a gap in the children's years of birth (that's what happened in my family on my mother's side). All of these families had to learn a new language, sometimes one that was in a new alphabet. In those days of tough travel, they had to assume that they'd never see their old homeland or other relatives again. I know I could never be that brave.
    The daring and confidence of this group of people is just mind-boggling. To me, it is like all those folks that have signed up to start a colony on Mars. On the other hand. in every generation there are pioneers who are not afraid to strike out to make their fortunes or to meet their fate.

  15. #15
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Falling-again!-at an ice rink near you!
    Posts
    2,235
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    That certainly speaks well for Jens Olsen! A large-hearted man.

    Have you ever seen the movie Hester Street? It's a modest little film that dealt with another common problem of the immigration pattern where the guy comes over first and then sends for the family years later. A Jewish man, Yankel, has gone to New York from Russia (Hester Street is a location on the Lower East Side, where a lot of immigrants first lived) and become Americanized. His traditional wife and their son arrive. While she navigates the changes and decides which ones to adopt (including uncovering her head "like a Gentile woman"), Yankel, now Jake, has found a more forward-thinking lady and wants a divorce. Probably the best-known performer in this authentic-feeling little movie is Carol Kane, who plays Jake's young wife Gitl. A lot hinges on her choices. I'm always in awe of the path that generation took, in all the cultures that came here. More often than not, families had to separate for years at a time. Sometimes the wife arrived with someone like Carrie Leifsdottir, or the husband met her at the pier with a story of his own. Sometimes the pair of them managed to wait and reunite, and there's a gap in the children's years of birth (that's what happened in my family on my mother's side). All of these families had to learn a new language, sometimes one that was in a new alphabet. In those days of tough travel, they had to assume that they'd never see their old homeland or other relatives again. I know I could never be that brave.
    Poor Carol Kane. She got an Oscar nomination for that and it killed her career for quite a few years. It's quite a good movie.

    The stories are very interesting. When you live in Manhattan you forget just how big and wild the rest of America is. (Of course we're a bit wild here too in the Big Apple, but in very different ways!).

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •