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Thread: Can Patrick Chan cope with the pressure of Olympic favouritism?

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebonnet View Post
    Well, the results from all the competitions clearly showed that that was not the case. Were all the judges from all different competitions, which have been formed by different people as judge, wrong or was your commentator wrong?
    While kozuka is very light on his feet and the way his blade touches the ice is an art form he doesn't have Patrick's very deep edges or his wonderful upper body movements.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianSkaterGuy View Post
    Hah he isn't the sentimental favourite because he is the *favourite*. Just like S/S were the favourites in Vancouver but S/Z were the sentimental favourites. Your haterade is yet again fuelling your delusion if you think that only people in Canada want to see Chan win. He has fans internationally who are rooting for him.

    p.s. Hope you didn't cry too much or pull your hair out too hard when Chan won yet again (and by a landslide, at that).
    You mean he didn't fall 6 times.....oh dear someone finds herself wrong!

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianSkaterGuy View Post
    ...Your haterade is yet again fuelling your delusion if you think that only people in Canada want to see Chan win. He has fans internationally who are rooting for him.
    During the Worlds competition in Russia, I remember a closeup of a group of Russian fans standing and cheering after Patrick's winning skate. It was funny, because a few seats over was a woman who was giving these fans a looong disgusted stare.

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    I remember that the great Tarasova stood up and cheered for Patrick after his long.
    He is also a skaters skater and nearly all of them will show you their appreciation of his skills.

    His skills with the blade are most noticeable when he is skating in a practice with other high ranked skaters.

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianSkaterGuy View Post
    Actually in Canada he is quite well known. Similar to how Takahashi and Asada is a household name in Japan but outside of the skating circle and the skater's home country, few people know who he is. That's a problem with the sport not the skaters. Not everyone can be a Michelle Kwan.
    For whatever the reason, I don't think that people in Canada have warmed up to Patrick Chan. He has a lot of traits that don't make him easily likeable and those traits have been exploited by certain sports reporters (one reporter seems to stand out in my mind in particular) to establish a less than flattering image. Part of it is unfair press, but part of it has also been the circumstances of the last two worlds (where there were genuine issues) and part of it has to be that he just, himself, was saying things he should not have said. In the past, he has not been a help in giving the sport a foothold upon which it could become more popular. Not his fault in the grand scheme, but he sure has not been a help (and some of the criticisms against him were quite fair).

    To his credit, he continued to be there through it all. To me, he has his pre-Krall period where he was golden, his Krall period where everything tensed up too tightly (even when he skated astoundingly well), and finally, now, his new period where he has set himself free and can have a focus that is all of comfortable, commanding and intense. I am talking about what seems to be his mental space as much as his skating space. I thought it was a rather ironic and beautiful statement of his power that he skated his short at Skate Canada with out a quad (totally Krall-less) and established, in my mind, for the first time fully his self as his own skater. He was at Skate Canada able to show that he was in a space that was his own and that no one else can touch him. In that space, nothing can affect his skating, not even bad interviews or stories. (Nevertheless, aside from his skating space, I wish that he would start avoiding certain reporters. He should have learned by now which ones they are.)

    Regarding mental space and pressure, I am now more worrying about other skaters finding theirs, so that they can skate their best. (If everyone skates their best, we all win no matter what the result.) I think Patrick has and can find his space to deal with the pressure, as shown at Skate Canada. And as regards his reputation, the sport really is about skating for most of us, right? The other stuff we talk about, acknowledge and has some secondary importance (and often legitimately choose who we like and want to win), but we really are here first and foremost to laud great skating. But for Patrick this year, he can handle the pressure.

  6. #81
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    He was under quite a bit of pressure and high expectations in Vancouver, given that it was a home Olympics. Has he said what factors contributed to his somewhat disappointing showing there, and specifically has he done something which will help him address it this time (on a mental preparation basis in particular)? Obviously he has much more experience under his belt, as well as some additional years of personal maturity. But does he work with a sports psychologist (for instance)?

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    Quote Originally Posted by phaeljones View Post
    Regarding mental space and pressure, I am now more worrying about other skaters finding theirs, so that they can skate their best. (If everyone skates their best, we all win no matter what the result.) I think Patrick has and can find his space to deal with the pressure, as shown at Skate Canada. And as regards his reputation, the sport really is about skating for most of us, right? The other stuff we talk about, acknowledge and has some secondary importance (and often legitimately choose who we like and want to win), but we really are here first and foremost to laud great skating. But for Patrick this year, he can handle the pressure.
    I agree that he should avoid certain Canadian reporter/reporters. However I cannot say that much about he can handle the pressure this year. Let's not jump ahead and take one competition and apply it to all, whether it is a good competition or it is a bad competition. I can only say so far so good. And wish him good luck. He cannot rest on anything because he has had the absolutely best outing on the first GP event this season. So far it shows that Patrick is still the one to chase. But he needs to rely on his clean skating with quads if everyone skates clean when it comes to the top skaters packed event like GPF and Olympics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emdee View Post
    While kozuka is very light on his feet and the way his blade touches the ice is an art form he doesn't have Patrick's very deep edges or his wonderful upper body movements.
    I agree. Kozuka's SS are wonderful because of their lightness and ease of movement. Patrick's are wonderful because of the edges he gets on them. He has better edges and turns than many ice dancers... and there is literally every turn and step integrated into his program. I agree with somebody earlier who said his ice coverage during his FS is remarkable. Even if he isn't emotionally your cup of tea, there's no denying his actual skating is just breathtaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Actually, S/Z were the favorites going into Vancouver, having had a very strong GP campaign while S/S struggled all season. A pity as to the latter, because they had lovely programs while S/Z were not skating to their best material.
    I think it was more neck in neck, but the Germans had won the previous two World Championships while S/Z were on the comeback trail. I guess it'd be like Lysacek being the favourite (being the reigning World Champion) and Plushenko being the sentimental favourite (maybe Lambiel, too). S/S indeed had a bad GP season though, so it was becoming more apparent that S/Z would take gold -- although a comeback is always a question mark until we actually see the skater do well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rvi5 View Post
    During the Worlds competition in Russia, I remember a closeup of a group of Russian fans standing and cheering after Patrick's winning skate. It was funny, because a few seats over was a woman who was giving these fans a looong disgusted stare.
    I didn't know pangtongfan had a twin sister in Russia!

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    Quote Originally Posted by lcd View Post
    He was under quite a bit of pressure and high expectations in Vancouver, given that it was a home Olympics. Has he said what factors contributed to his somewhat disappointing showing there, and specifically has he done something which will help him address it this time (on a mental preparation basis in particular)? Obviously he has much more experience under his belt, as well as some additional years of personal maturity. But does he work with a sports psychologist (for instance)?
    Other than the pressure of skating on home ice, Patrick said it was a very difficult season due to his injury. He missed his second GP assignment and his training due to having the H1N1 flu which lead to a calf injury. He planned on adding a quad during that season until that injury threw off his training schedule.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Srin Odessa View Post
    Other than the pressure of skating on home ice, Patrick said it was a very difficult season due to his injury. He missed his second GP assignment and his training due to having the H1N1 flu which lead to a calf injury. He planned on adding a quad during that season until that injury threw off his training schedule.
    He also lived in a one room motel in Florida for a good part of that season... so personal conditions were not optimal.
    I also had the H1N1 flu that year and was in bed for ten days. It hit younger people more so I can believe it really decimated him. I think I was exhausted for two weeks after that.

  13. #88
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    Certainly Vancouver could have turned out very differently if the men hadn't been so hard hit by health issues. Others who had problems that season include Tomas Verner (H1N1), Daisuke Takahashi (not fully recovered from his ACL tear and subsequent surgery), Evgeni Plushenko (Knees? Back?), Stephane Lambiel (adductor, I believe) and Brian Joubert (foot surgery to repair tendon/ligament damage).

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    Lysacek also dealt with a stress fracture in his foot. It's not uncommon for skaters to compete with injuries or severe pain at high level events. There's a risk of losing world ranking points, an endorsement, or a chance at gold medal at the Olympics.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srin Odessa View Post
    Lysacek also dealt with a stress fracture in his foot. It's not uncommon for skaters to compete with injuries or severe pain at high level events. There's a risk of losing world ranking points, an endorsement, or a chance at gold medal at the Olympics.
    Lysacek was diagnosed with a stress fracture in his foot more than a year before the Olympics. I don't believe that's quite as serious a setback as what some of the others were dealing with. Joubert and Chan missed competitions during the Olympic season because of their health issues, while Lambiel and Takahashi had to sit out the entire previous season (Lambiel actually retired because it appeared his injury would not be manageable).

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