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Thread: Abuse of Young People in Figure Skating

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowflake View Post
    Thanks Npmonice for your answers.

    Anyway i think it's good for children to do sports for fun and try many in young years. If they want to focus on one sport early on, like you probably must in figure skating, I think it's neccesary to have a diverse training: Running, playing ball games, wrestling or whatever. Not just jumping, jumping, spinning on the ice.

    I agree to a certain degree. Cross training can be good as long as it has a purpose and is related to the sport you choose.

    Of course different countries have different ways of approaching things. I dare say the little jumping beans from Russia have probably concentrated on figure skating from an early age. It also helps if the said country has a good infrastructure/system in place. As I refer to Norway again, it does not have a good system for figure skating and that's why we see no results from Norway.

    I do not want to offend anyone who may read the post from Norway, this is just my opinion on what I have seen and experienced with my own eyes.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodlepal View Post

    Also, I am not a gynecologist. I do not know the "normal" age of puberty. But as a teacher in several girls' schools over the years, I can say that it is not common for someone to be the age of these Russian ballerinas and still have not gone through the "change." I would worry that excessive exercise is delaying their menstrual cycle more than anything else. This "puberty monster" that is attacking people at 16 comes about 3-4 years earlier for most of us.
    This is something that strikes me as well. It's true of gymnasts as well as skaters. Every time I hear of a fourteen-year-old who is under five feet tall and less than ninety pounds, it makes me anxious. This is not a typical developmental line for girls, even in most of Asia. It does have a lot to do with the percentage of body fat, which is partly from diet (those restrictive "training" diets) and partly from excessive exercise. There can be both short-term and long-term effects, on things such as bone development.

  3. #48
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    I think it would be completely unfair to limit training hours for young figure skaters. Most of them wouldn't be doing it if they didn't want to and if the teenagers are the ones making the podium in international events, so be it. Most of these girls, such as Julia, are all muscle and I see nothing wrong with that. They're all in excellent shape and obviously keep very healthy lifestyles. I am a figure skater myself and if someone put a limit on the jumps I could do and the hours I could practice, I would be furious.

  4. #49
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Welcome to GS, Nataliec 817!

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nataliec817 View Post
    I think it would be completely unfair to limit training hours for young figure skaters. Most of them wouldn't be doing it if they didn't want to and if the teenagers are the ones making the podium in international events, so be it. Most of these girls, such as Julia, are all muscle and I see nothing wrong with that. They're all in excellent shape and obviously keep very healthy lifestyles. I am a figure skater myself and if someone put a limit on the jumps I could do and the hours I could practice, I would be furious.
    I agree with that.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by nataliec817 View Post
    I think it would be completely unfair to limit training hours for young figure skaters. Most of them wouldn't be doing it if they didn't want to and if the teenagers are the ones making the podium in international events, so be it. Most of these girls, such as Julia, are all muscle and I see nothing wrong with that. They're all in excellent shape and obviously keep very healthy lifestyles. I am a figure skater myself and if someone put a limit on the jumps I could do and the hours I could practice, I would be furious.
    I agree. These girls aren't fragile as they may seem or doing something they don't know how to. They're athletes, they've been doing this for a while. Age limits don't prevent injury and some skaters are at their peak at 14, making them sit out for another two years doesn't help. Tracey Wainman, a former Canadian Champion, and a teenage sensation during the 80s, has often pointed out that if she didn't get to go to Worlds when she was at her peak, she'd probably never get to go at all.

    I think the priority should be on keeping the material age appropriate, and I think Julia's LP is. She has a maturity and a seriousness about her, and her costume isn't overly sexy. What about watching out for abusive coaches? It's more emotionally that girls are vulnerable than physically.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    This is something that strikes me as well. It's true of gymnasts as well as skaters. Every time I hear of a fourteen-year-old who is under five feet tall and less than ninety pounds, it makes me anxious. This is not a typical developmental line for girls, even in most of Asia. It does have a lot to do with the percentage of body fat, which is partly from diet (those restrictive "training" diets) and partly from excessive exercise. There can be both short-term and long-term effects, on things such as bone development.
    I don't think we can conclude that because a girl is small (ie, skinny) that puberty has been delayed. It is true that body fat percentage can have an effect but I am skeptical that most skaters fall below the levels needed for puberty to occur (unless they have an eating disorder). It would be interesting to see some statistics on this, though I don't expect any. I think what we are seeing is not puberty per se, which in most cases occurs between ages 11 and 14, but the development that many girls go through in their mid to late teens, when their bodies fill out. This is not limited to skaters.

  8. #53
    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    With so many girls getting puberty by age 10 in the USA, I think anything that "delays" it to the normal age (like I suppose skating would) would be a good thing. With all the hormones and other crap injected into our foods - sports training is the least of our worries for our children.

  9. #54
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    In most of the 1900s, girls started menstrating at about 15 but now it's around 12, with many more going through precocious puberty at much younger and alarming age. Early puberty has many causes including toxins in food, personal and household products as well as in the environment, and incurs a host of health risks and social/behavioral problems in the lives of such kids.

    The sèemingly late onset of puberty in many athletes may actually be healthy and normal even though standard for normal has been skewed.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkateFiguring View Post
    In most of the 1900s, girls started menstrating at about 15 but now it's around 12, with many more going through precocious puberty at much younger and alarming age. Early puberty has many causes including toxins in food, personal and household products as well as in the environment, and incurs a host of health risks and social/behavioral problems in the lives of such kids.

    The sèemingly late onset of puberty in many athletes may actually be healthy and normal even though standard for normal has been skewed.
    One medical site I just found via google says it is potentially a medical issue before 8 or if delayed past 16. So most girls in skating who have a bit of delay are probably just fine.

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