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Thread: Best foods for skaters-different by country?

  1. #16
    Custom Title chapis's Avatar
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    Definitly the food in USA afect the growth, in México almost everyone have family in US and the height and weight difference are notable, even when they migrate since kids and not necessarily generations before.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by brightphoton View Post
    What happened to Min Jeong Kwak? The last I remember she (surprisingly) didn't make it out of the SP at 2011 Worlds.
    off-topic, but to answer: she is almost about to retire.
    She is suffering from injuries.
    After 2010 Worlds, she got an injury. And THAT INJURY has been kept on until now.
    What's worse is that she also tripped over on the steps last year and couldn't skate for few months.
    Conclusion: she only skated at a national skate event last season once, and she's skipping this whole season due to injury.
    (And for correction:At 2011 Worlds, min-jeong didn't pass the preliminary round. It was 2012 when she didn't made it to FS.)

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chapis View Post
    Definitly the food in USA afect the growth, in México almost everyone have family in US and the height and weight difference are notable, even when they migrate since kids and not necessarily generations before.
    Yes, American food is definitely calorie-rich. But you can find pizza, burger and chicken chains everywhere, and hormone fed meat is a worldwide problem, not just in the U.S.

    At the risk of simplification, I'd say it's individual/family genetics first, diet habit second, ethnic genetics third. Plus there are some people naturally prone to weight gain, and some not so much. I've seen people who can eat whatever they want and still manage to stay fit. I guess body metabolism rate differs from person to person (not sure it makes scientific sense though). I remember Yuna Kim saying she had difficulties keeping her weight in check during teenage years, but now in her twenties she is eating healthy portions since otherwise she's losing weight while training.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by thinspread View Post
    At the risk of simplification, I'd say it's individual/family genetics first, diet habit second, ethnic genetics third. Plus there are some people naturally prone to weight gain, and some not so much. I've seen people who can eat whatever they want and still manage to stay fit. I guess body metabolism rate differs from person to person (not sure it makes scientific sense though). I remember Yuna Kim saying she had difficulties keeping her weight in check during teenage years, but now in her twenties she is eating healthy portions since otherwise she's losing weight while training.
    I'd say the first two things you mention are pretty much equal, with the overall ethnic background being secondary. Body metabolism does differ from person to person and it does change within the same person as you move through life. It's a universal occurrence regardless of ethnic background.

    FWIW, I'm not an athlete but I do regular exercise and have a much harder time controlling my weight in Asia than in North America. Go Figure. This is despite a primarily traditional Asian diet when in Asia and about a 1/3 Asian, 2/3 Western diet in the U.S. I have never been able to figure out why this is, as in addition to exercising in a gym (both places), in China I also routinely commute and do errands (many km per day) by bicycle, walk like a racewalker, and do a bunch more physical labor vs in the U.S. I do note that my food quality in the U.S.A. seems much better than in China. (In both places, I cook using mostly fresh ingredients with little processed food, and don't eat out that much.)

  5. #20
    I got your program components right here. Pepe Nero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skateluvr View Post
    Maybe our Asian members and Amerasian members could speak to a question in my mind. When Mirai and caroline Z were tiny, it was of course easier. It seems the top Asian women are very tiny, thin always, YuNa, Mao, Akiko, Miki, on and on.

    I wonder if Caroline or Mirai have given interviews. I think in the USA, the food supply is so damaged with chemicals, genetically modified foods, pesticides that act as phytoestrogens which clearly cause weight gain and cancers. Is Japan much better about banning the mess we have in USA? I wonder if Mirai and Caroline eat a traditional Asian diet or a mixed, or American diet. Their weight gain and development is different than the asian girls I see. Where I live, there is not a very visible Asian community tho. Even if Mirai and Caroline skate and work out, it seems they are developing like many causcasian girls. I am not picking on them-they are beautiful, but their development into women seems to have made jumping much harder.

    I wonder what most figure skaters eat-or other high performance athletes like gymnasts? I know many starve them selves, but thery don't usually become champions. I know Akiko had an eating disorder, but she seems to have much energy and good weight now, thankfully. It made me wonder if the food rules were much stricter than what is happening in this country.
    Please stop.

    Do you think about what male skaters eat? (It doesn't seem so.)

    Skateluvr, I sincerely believe that you mean well. But, in my view, one needs to think twice before one posts publicly messages about gender-related issues, whether it is about how male skaters dress or about what female skaters eat. One might quite unintentionally support destructive beliefs and attitudes.

  6. #21
    Skating is art, if you let it be. Blades of Passion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepe Nero View Post
    One might quite unintentionally support destructive beliefs and attitudes.
    Don't you think someone needs to be educated about said "destructive beliefs and attitudes" in order to know if/why their viewpoint is wrong? How else would someone know they had been unintentionally supporting it to begin with?

    Knowledge and perspective is important and the internet and message boards are vital resources for further eduction. We all need to share what we believe with each other and hopefully, after assessing all of the different viewpoints and data out there, we all come to a greater shared understanding about a topic.

    This is a good thread. Nutrition is extremely overlooked. The vast majority of people really don't understand exactly how bad certain foods are for them and what benefits they can get out of lesser-known foods. The original poster is wondering exactly what Mirai and Caroline are eating. Why is this a bad question? Athletes in most other sports give in-depth interviews on the topic.

  7. #22
    I got your program components right here. Pepe Nero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blades of Passion View Post
    Don't you think someone needs to be educated about said "destructive beliefs and attitudes" in order to know if/why their viewpoint is wrong? How else would someone know they had been unintentionally supporting it to begin with?

    Knowledge and perspective is important and the internet and message boards are vital resources for further eduction. We all need to share what we believe with each other and hopefully, after assessing all of the different viewpoints and data out there, we all come to a greater shared understanding about a topic.
    In reply to your first question, Blades of Passion, yes. But I have learned to hesitate about saying much on gender topics on the internet. One of my earliest, formative experiences on GoldenSkate was a thread I started called "Feminism and Figure Skating." It was widely flamed, I was called a troll, and the thread was eventually moved to "Politics." This for suggesting that there might be some gender bias against women in the sport. Now, I am slightly more cagey.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blades of Passion View Post
    This is a good thread. Nutrition is extremely overlooked. The vast majority of people really don't understand exactly how bad certain foods are for them and what benefits they can get out of lesser-known foods. The original poster is wondering exactly what Mirai and Caroline are eating. Why is this a bad question? Athletes in most other sports give in-depth interviews on the topic.
    I find it problematic that eating issues are being raised in relation to female skaters only. Of course nutrition is important. But when the question is raised only or foremost in relation to female skaters, it suggests something far more than concern for nutrition. Let me reiterate that I mean to imply nothing about anyone's intentions. My worry is that these questions reflect a pervasive cultural attitude that women's bodies are for the public in general to judge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skateluvr View Post
    As for Yamaguchi-either just lucky and maybe the food supply was not as tainted when she was competing, plus she likely ate traditional Japanese food and stayed away from empty carbs.
    She does have casual healthy diets, but more lucky; for God's blessings, she's was a professional HOTDOG EATING CHAMPION!!!

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    Can't speak for others, but I gained at least 15-20 pounds the first year I moved to the U.S. from China, and what's sad is that I didn't even realize how notably it was until I got back the next summer and everyone I know noticed my fat arms. Then I spent a month in China, ate like a pig and lost at least 8-10 pounds. When I went back to the U.S. I really changed my diet and went back to my normal Chinese weight. I think the problem for me was that American food is so bland that only chocolate, candies and ice cream appeals to me.

    I always think the word "healthy" is misguiding. Chinese food is hardly very "healthy" in the true sense of the word. Heavy uses of spice and artificial flavors, crazy amount of cooking oil, borderline dangerous seafood variety, high calories (we eat pork fats and chicken livers here), and we overeat every single meal by and large, but it is a reasonably balanced diet, while American food relies way too heavily on diary products and sugar. I once asked a friend of mine to quit milk for a few weeks and he really slimmed down a good bit.

    So in short, food matters, though I don't think Mirai and Caroline's problems are mainly from their weight gain.

  10. #25
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    American food is sooooooooooooooooo sweet (and I hate that....) compare to its counterpart in Asian food (Chinese, Japanese, Korea, whatever..) And I think Korean food is the leanest among all asian food.

  11. #26
    Custom Title skateluvr's Avatar
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    Thank you for participating everyone. Obviously I agree with Blades rather than Pepe Nero. Wondering about our food supply being more pesticide laden and thus the phytoestrogen issue is a very serious issue that affects women much more than men because we store fat more easily and in female places, and not only weight gain, but the fat leads to cancers, as well as the heightened estrogen present. I repeat, all the ladies from Japan, Korea, China I have seen compete are very thin. I couldn't help but notice the different bodies Mirai and Caroline grew into. Yes, people might ignorantly flame, but the thread is really about what is happening to the American food chain. When people who skate and train 6-8 hours a day develop very differently from Asian counterparts, then one might wonder why.

    Men lose weight much easier. Most men who over eat store it in there gut. I have seen men go from obese to normal in three months, while women do the same diet and do not lose weight or even gain. When women develop, they often lose the triple triples. Men do not have this issue. So yes, it is a woman's issue, and female skater/athletes's issue. I have learned new stuff, and realize I will need to someday really do more medical research, but there are many smart, educated Asians here, and living in countries I don't see, so why not ask? Yes, one does get flamed. In another thread, I did find resistence to some of my honesty re costuming, but I found more agreed than disagreed.

    It is sad that you will get trashed if you criticize anything about skater x because that skater has ubers likely. One has to be a bit bold or brave. I am curious, and also live in a small world due to illness and TV being so awful. I don't travel like I wanted to, and I read a lot on internet just serfing.

    Like Pepe Nero, I am enthralled with skating, though it is no longer an American dominated sport. TRhank you Blades for realizing the legitimacy of the question re: nutrition, food supply. Mirai used to read the boards, maybe she or Caroline will pop in and tell us what there diets are like when training. And also answer the question we speculate on...how much ha body change affected what they can do on the ice.

    Many have been dismissive of Caroline. Sadly, this is her last season most likely. I hope she has a nice skate at Nationals, and I will remember her pearl spin forever. Mirai still has a chance I hope. I love her skating, whether she rotates her triple fully or not. I want to see that spark again. I'll never forget her Vancouver skates-such fun-such quality and joy. That goes for Flatt, too.

  12. #27
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    Well, as one poster pointed out, Gao is Asian-American and she's still thin. I think weight issues lie with the individual, not the ethnicity. That being said, "bad" food might be promoted more in the United States than it is in Japan, what with a McDonald's and a Starbucks on every corner, so people like Mirai and Caroline may be more tempted to eat it.

  13. #28
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    Kale for all.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue_idealist View Post
    Well, as one poster pointed out, Gao is Asian-American and she's still thin. I think weight issues lie with the individual, not the ethnicity. That being said, "bad" food might be promoted more in the United States than it is in Japan, what with a McDonald's and a Starbucks on every corner, so people like Mirai and Caroline may be more tempted to eat it.
    I mostly agree with you. Inter-personal differences within an ethnic group are much bigger than the inter-racial differences. I think the availability of high-calorie and junk foods are now pretty equal in urban areas around the world. AFAIK Japan has the biggest per capita number of McDonald outlets, ex-U.S. Also, the use of growth hormones, antibiotics and pesticides are common practices worldwide. As you mentioned, there are many U.S. female athletes who remain thin beyond puberty, regardless of the ethnic background. I assume most elite athletes strictly control their diets, so I still think it's individual genetics first and whatever small differences in diet habit second, as the decisive factors.

    Definitely female athletes would have harder time keeping their body fat levels under control and contour changes in check. Nature made it that way, and they would need intensive physical actitivites in addition to diet control to fight back the puberty attack. If they overcome that process and keep their jump techniques intact through it, I don't see why not they can extend their technically competitive career well into their late twenties, since women also can gain more muscle mass and strength in their twenties compared to their teenage years.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepe Nero View Post
    I find it problematic that eating issues are being raised in relation to female skaters only. Of course nutrition is important. But when the question is raised only or foremost in relation to female skaters, it suggests something far more than concern for nutrition. Let me reiterate that I mean to imply nothing about anyone's intentions. My worry is that these questions reflect a pervasive cultural attitude that women's bodies are for the public in general to judge.
    I understand what you're saying, but to be fair a female build more like a man (smaller chest, narrower hips) is going to find rotating triples easier. Unfortunately, this reality doesn't represent what a healthy female body should necessarily look like, but rather reflects genetics and diet.

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