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Thread: Yuna's free program to Adios Nonino - Review

  1. #61
    Six Point Zero Krislite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks777 View Post
    Even more perfect?? It's not well choreographed nor performed at all. Yuna please point your toe when you are moving your feet... I really like her with a dynamic music, she should consider bringing back her old program. This program reminds me of Asada's LP at Vancouver. It's just not suited for her.
    Oh dear, I knew I shouldn't have brought rough translations by fans over here. Now folks like you are going to over analyze every English word she didn't actually say.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krislite View Post
    Yes, let's contradict Yuna and tell her "you should feel rested at points x, y and z". Why aren't you feeling that way!? I know your physical condition better than you.
    so may be she should to say she is not in perfect condition yet for this program, sorry but with those quote I interpreted that the program itself is really demanding. And everyone know that the main objective of poses is catch the breath

  3. #63
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    what do you mean folks like me?

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks777 View Post
    what do you mean folks like me?
    That quote was a rough translation by a fan of her interview soundbites. Any reasonable person would not take the words so literally, like "perfect" as if it meant the exact same thing in Korean as in English, especially since she didn't speak in English during the interview.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krislite View Post
    That quote was a rough translation by a fan of her interview soundbites. Any reasonable person would not take the words so literally, like "perfect" as if it meant the exact same thing in Korean as in English, especially since she didn't speak in English during the interview.
    You didn't answer my question.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks777 View Post
    You didn't answer my question.
    Very well. If you feel that response doesn't answer your question, then I won't elaborate any further. Let's leave it at that.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krislite View Post
    Very well. If you feel that response doesn't answer your question, then I won't elaborate any further. Let's leave it at that.
    huh? you call me " folks like you".. what do you mean by that?

  8. #68
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    When "Send in the Clowns" and "Adios Nonino" were announced as Yuna's music choices for this season, I checked them out and was not impressed by the selections for her finale. However after Friday, I think David did an excellent, excellent job with the "Send in the Clowns" cut. I love it. But I think part of the problem with Yuna's LP unfortunately might still be the music. I think it doesn't lend itself to good flow and continuity, it has great moments such as the layback ina bauer to 3+2+2, but as a whole it seems all over the place and even comes up flat in spots that kind of kill the emotion for me.

    If I look hard, I can see a performance, but at times it felt the same as when I see most other skaters -- that is to say, just skating with music not really fitting in the background. This NEVER happens for me when Yuna skates!

    I really like the idea some of you mentioned about the tango, that it should be a slow burning fire. The key words that come to mind for me are intensity and determination. Conviction about Yuna's path forward in life and her appreciation of what she has accomplished. I also keep coming back to:

    1. Send in the Clowns: Goodbye, a remembrance of the past
    2. Adios Nonino: Farewell, we now part into the rest of life

    I think if Yuna would approach it this way, it would benefit her performance. The music need not be interpreted literally, as an elegy. But the spirit of the music can be retained, that is to say a bit of a somber tango, because it's the end of one life. However, it's also the beginning of a new life, and that's why I think it's important for triumph and hope, something positive, to stand out in the end.

  9. #69
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    I think it's too late to alter the music or choreo much now, but I think what I'd like to see is a more somber, subdued performance in the first half or so (with occasional smiles or flashes of fire) but then a more triumphant and positive approach with greater energy in the latter part of the program. Does this make sense? As I said earlier this is kind of counter to nature, because even at peak conditioning, Yuna will get tired as the program winds down, but it's as if she will need her energy to increase at the end for this one. The final choreo sq. is where we should see that, it doesn't much fit the music now, and should build to a much faster, dizzying pace and climax.

  10. #70
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    Also does anyone else think it would be more dramatic if she did her combination spin where her layback spin currently is? I think it would fit the music better, and she could exit right at that awful dead spot in the music, kind of give her a brief respite before the final choreo sequence, which needs to be revamped to something much more dizzying and climactic. This would also allow for some other redesign after the last 2A, but the final pose looks really good.

  11. #71
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    Interview with Yuna on Korean news

    Q. It looks like you finished your first event well.
    A. There's a lot that I'm not satisfied with. But considering it was the first event, it wasn't bad.

    Q. I'm curious about the circumstances of your injury.
    A. Injuries are present, 365 days out of the year. All skaters have injuries, small or big. With the triple lutz and the flip in particular, you have to use your right toepick to vault, and it's been about 12 years since I started jumping these jumps. And I've practiced them more. So it was about time that this kind of (right-foot) injury occurred. The injury came through accumulation of shock to my foot. So it wasn't a sudden onset of pain, but a steady increase of it, so I got it examined.

    Q. How is it now?
    A. It's not all better. It doesn't go away unless you rest completely. That's something I have to deal with until I retire. That's not just me, all skaters have one chronic condition. It hurt a lot, but I wasn't affected too much mentally. The most important thing is the Olympics and making sure I'm in top form for that.

    Q. You must have felt uncomfortable skipping the Grand Prix series in such an important season.
    A. My competitors are able to go and get good scores at big events, so it is disadvantageous for me that I skipped. But still, Olympics are the most important thing. I was in a situation where I couldn't strain myself, and really it didn't seem like a good idea in any way for me to enter an event.

    Q. Your goals for Sochi?
    A. I've already got my gold medal. I have no particular pressure about the results. It will be my last competitive event, so whatever result I get I think I can end it happily. It's not about Gold or Silver, but rather doing as well in competition as I do in practice. I want to have a fun experience and end my competitive career.

    Q. Sochi is your retirement, then.
    A. There's my injury and everything so I really want to rest. It's strange to say I'm old but I am for an athlete, and my body isn't what it used to be. What I could have done with 60% strength in the past, I can barely do with 100% now. My injuries don't recover as fast and my stamina doesn't either. So right now I just wish it were over soon. I want to rest, whatever the result.

    Q. Aren't you nervous about post-career life?
    A. I am nervous. I've been figure skating since I was 7. I've never done anything else. I don't know if I'll be good at anything else. I'm afraid of starting from a blank page.

    Q. What will you feel after Sochi?
    A. I don't think I'll feel empty or anything. I've done as much as I could. I think I'll be happy. I'm just a bit worried about what comes after.

    Q. What have you learned through figure skating?
    A. Endurance? (laughs) Every day is enduring. It's the same for everyone but sports is about repetitive routines. And overcoming the nerves of the competition. There's something you can't know unless you're an athlete. I've learned to endure those things. And in the process, you become serene about it. I've been told I have strong nerves before, but I think I've become better at mind control.

    Q. How do you imagine your future life?
    A. I'm not sure, specifically, what I'll do. But in any position, I don't want to let go of figure skating completely. I'd like to do anything that made me happy.

  12. #72
    Six Point Zero Krislite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmelanie View Post
    Interview with Yuna on Korean news

    Q. It looks like you finished your first event well.
    A. There's a lot that I'm not satisfied with. But considering it was the first event, it wasn't bad.

    Q. I'm curious about the circumstances of your injury.
    A. Injuries are present, 365 days out of the year. All skaters have injuries, small or big. With the triple lutz and the flip in particular, you have to use your right toepick to vault, and it's been about 12 years since I started jumping these jumps. And I've practiced them more. So it was about time that this kind of (right-foot) injury occurred. The injury came through accumulation of shock to my foot. So it wasn't a sudden onset of pain, but a steady increase of it, so I got it examined.

    Q. How is it now?
    A. It's not all better. It doesn't go away unless you rest completely. That's something I have to deal with until I retire. That's not just me, all skaters have one chronic condition. It hurt a lot, but I wasn't affected too much mentally. The most important thing is the Olympics and making sure I'm in top form for that.

    Q. You must have felt uncomfortable skipping the Grand Prix series in such an important season.
    A. My competitors are able to go and get good scores at big events, so it is disadvantageous for me that I skipped. But still, Olympics are the most important thing. I was in a situation where I couldn't strain myself, and really it didn't seem like a good idea in any way for me to enter an event.

    Q. Your goals for Sochi?
    A. I've already got my gold medal. I have no particular pressure about the results. It will be my last competitive event, so whatever result I get I think I can end it happily. It's not about Gold or Silver, but rather doing as well in competition as I do in practice. I want to have a fun experience and end my competitive career.

    Q. Sochi is your retirement, then.
    A. There's my injury and everything so I really want to rest. It's strange to say I'm old but I am for an athlete, and my body isn't what it used to be. What I could have done with 60% strength in the past, I can barely do with 100% now. My injuries don't recover as fast and my stamina doesn't either. So right now I just wish it were over soon. I want to rest, whatever the result.

    Q. Aren't you nervous about post-career life?
    A. I am nervous. I've been figure skating since I was 7. I've never done anything else. I don't know if I'll be good at anything else. I'm afraid of starting from a blank page.

    Q. What will you feel after Sochi?
    A. I don't think I'll feel empty or anything. I've done as much as I could. I think I'll be happy. I'm just a bit worried about what comes after.

    Q. What have you learned through figure skating?
    A. Endurance? (laughs) Every day is enduring. It's the same for everyone but sports is about repetitive routines. And overcoming the nerves of the competition. There's something you can't know unless you're an athlete. I've learned to endure those things. And in the process, you become serene about it. I've been told I have strong nerves before, but I think I've become better at mind control.

    Q. How do you imagine your future life?
    A. I'm not sure, specifically, what I'll do. But in any position, I don't want to let go of figure skating completely. I'd like to do anything that made me happy.
    Thank you! Great responses from her. Even she says there's a lot she's not satisfied with about her first outing.

  13. #73
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    The program itself is beautiful and a perfect farewell piece for a champion like Yu-Na at the Olympic stage. I consider this David's best of the best. I love the music cut/editing. If someone does not see the potential, too bad. Obviously, Yu-Na has some work to do but I'm sure she will get it done by the time she shows up in Sochi. No doubt her performance at the Olympics will be beautiful and memorable. If Yu-Na's unpointed toe is the biggest complaint from some, I guess she must have done alright at her first competition.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmelanie View Post
    Interview with Yuna on Korean news

    Q. It looks like you finished your first event well.
    A. There's a lot that I'm not satisfied with. But considering it was the first event, it wasn't bad.

    Q. I'm curious about the circumstances of your injury.
    A. Injuries are present, 365 days out of the year. All skaters have injuries, small or big. With the triple lutz and the flip in particular, you have to use your right toepick to vault, and it's been about 12 years since I started jumping these jumps. And I've practiced them more. So it was about time that this kind of (right-foot) injury occurred. The injury came through accumulation of shock to my foot. So it wasn't a sudden onset of pain, but a steady increase of it, so I got it examined.

    Q. How is it now?
    A. It's not all better. It doesn't go away unless you rest completely. That's something I have to deal with until I retire. That's not just me, all skaters have one chronic condition. It hurt a lot, but I wasn't affected too much mentally. The most important thing is the Olympics and making sure I'm in top form for that.

    Q. You must have felt uncomfortable skipping the Grand Prix series in such an important season.
    A. My competitors are able to go and get good scores at big events, so it is disadvantageous for me that I skipped. But still, Olympics are the most important thing. I was in a situation where I couldn't strain myself, and really it didn't seem like a good idea in any way for me to enter an event.


    Q. Your goals for Sochi?
    A. I've already got my gold medal. I have no particular pressure about the results. It will be my last competitive event, so whatever result I get I think I can end it happily. It's not about Gold or Silver, but rather doing as well in competition as I do in practice. I want to have a fun experience and end my competitive career.

    Q. Sochi is your retirement, then.
    A. There's my injury and everything so I really want to rest. It's strange to say I'm old but I am for an athlete, and my body isn't what it used to be. What I could have done with 60% strength in the past, I can barely do with 100% now. My injuries don't recover as fast and my stamina doesn't either. So right now I just wish it were over soon. I want to rest, whatever the result.

    Q. Aren't you nervous about post-career life?
    A. I am nervous. I've been figure skating since I was 7. I've never done anything else. I don't know if I'll be good at anything else. I'm afraid of starting from a blank page.

    Q. What will you feel after Sochi?
    A. I don't think I'll feel empty or anything. I've done as much as I could. I think I'll be happy. I'm just a bit worried about what comes after.

    Q. What have you learned through figure skating?
    A. Endurance? (laughs) Every day is enduring. It's the same for everyone but sports is about repetitive routines. And overcoming the nerves of the competition. There's something you can't know unless you're an athlete. I've learned to endure those things. And in the process, you become serene about it. I've been told I have strong nerves before, but I think I've become better at mind control.

    Q. How do you imagine your future life?
    A. I'm not sure, specifically, what I'll do. But in any position, I don't want to let go of figure skating completely. I'd like to do anything that made me happy.
    This is so Yuna.

    And all those who keep insisting on "faking", injury or humility, candidness or publicity, better take this to heart.

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks777 View Post
    huh? you call me " folks like you".. what do you mean by that?
    That means insensitivity towards language barriers; such run into comments may easily translate into bullying, which I don't think you intent. It's easy to see that the translation meant "perfecting" and "improving". Krislite was actually telling you in a nice way.

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