Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Disappointed with Younger Skaters - Disson Shows

  1. #1
    Rinkside
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    6

    Thumbs down Disappointed with Younger Skaters - Disson Shows

    I was recently at the American Legends show through Disson. I have been to previous shows and they were all great, but there is something that bothers me about them. After the latest show I almost feel like something needs to be said to them. When my family left the show I know we were not the only ones that felt jipped...if that is the word to use. The skaters from the 80’s and early 90’s came out and skated their hearts out as best as they possibly could. Unless the skater is injured, like Evan Lysacek, I feel there should be no reason why those that have medaled since the mid 90’s to present can’t do the same as the ones I would not expect. Tara Lipinski and Sasha Cohen didn’t skate at all, instead they introduced dancers. I’ve seen Tara skate on the Today show without jumps, so it isn’t like she can’t do anything anymore with her past injuries. It seems as soon as Sasha started school she gave up on doing anything on the ice. Sarah Hughes came out with her niece, which was nice, but there were no jumps. It would be nice to see Kristi Yamaguchi out there again, doing something at least. On one of the Pandora shows Kimmie came out and did jumps and everything, and she is the last person I would expect because she tends to be forgotten nowadays. I don’t know, I’m just very disappointed.

  2. #2
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    577
    I agree, in general most of the exhibition skates by the 'pros' have been fairly lacking since the mid-2000's. They have become more about the guest singers than the skaters; I've not been to a live performance, but on TV it seems you get more shots of the singers than the skaters.

  3. #3
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3,118
    Ummmm...

    Compared to some, I'd never call Tara Lipinski and Sasha Cohen "younger" skaters...

  4. #4
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Staring at the ocean and smiling.
    Posts
    16,812
    Welcome to Golden Skate, Snapper-I hope we'll get some more inspiring skates from new pros after this Olympics.

  5. #5
    I like pie. Tonichelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Kenai, AK
    Posts
    18,720
    since most of the younger crew were forced to "retire" due to cronic injuries, I don't blame them for "watering down" the content. isn't the argument always figure *skating* not figure *jumping*?

    Hughes, Cohen, and Lipinski have been known for quite a while to not be doing many if any jumps, so knowing that I wouldn't expect them to suddenly throw out a few triple flips and a few lutzes...

  6. #6
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    602
    I think that we are also seeing fewer younger skaters continue to train and keep their skills up for a few reasons--
    *The modern era of triples/combos/quads takes a huge toll on the body and they either cannot or do not wish to continue training due to chronic or severe injuries.

    *There is not much of a pro circuit left for either income or to fill their time so they are moving on to other endeavors.

    *Many have had a longer elite level competitive career than skaters did in the past (before they were free to earn as much to support training and when a pro career was much more lucrative) which exacerbates the first issue and perhaps leaves them a bit burnt out as well.

    As for Kristi--she's 42 years old and has had two children. Not surprising that she doesn't wish to perform anymore.

  7. #7
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    2,323
    Unless otherwise stated, when a skater is on the bill, one expects they will skate. You certainly are not off based in feeling gypped.

  8. #8
    Custom Title spikydurian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    980
    I think if one wishes to see difficult jumps, it is better to watch competitions instead of show skating.

  9. #9
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    I think if one wishes to see difficult jumps, it is better to watch competitions instead of show skating.
    To me it's not that they don't do 'difficult jumps'; it looks like they are skating 1/2 speed and for the most part they do no jumps. Plus (at least on TV) they have a lot of camera shots of the singers, as many as if not more than the skaters. I'm not comparing the Stars on Ice vs. the GPF; I'm talking about the current show skating vs. the show skating of the late 90's.

  10. #10
    Rinkside
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    6
    I agree with what Icey said in that if they are on the schedule you expect them to do more than make an announcement. It isn't that I want to see a million 'difficult jumps', but it stinks to not have skated in a long time and say to myself "I could have done the same thing". I expect something a little more. Speaking of not expecting things, Kitty and Peter came out and performed at the show I was at...that was something I didn't expect to see.

  11. #11
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    765
    It's not just younger skaters. A lot of skaters treat skating shows as a time to show off their short program, only slower, without transitions, with fewer jumps, and set to the latest top hit from the Billboard Top 50 or soundtrack from that year's highest grossing movie. I remember I saw a skating show on TV, and there were a dozen mediocre programs. One particular low point was Sarah Hughes coming out literally to do one layback, then skate away. Only Shizuka Arakawa had a good program, elegant, well-thought out, and a pleasure to watch.

    I'm glad professional skating is dead in North America. If skaters (or skating show organizers) think people are gullible enough to pay lots of money to see skaters do a few spins and improvised "choreography," then they deserve the ticket sales they have. I'm disappointed that John Curry's ice theatre never took off. That's the kind of ice skating I would've liked to see.

    Besides, skaters don't even have to do triple jumps. What happened to a nice delayed single axel or a series of falling leafs?

  12. #12
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,187
    I think it comes down to the practical realities of professional skating today. There simply are not enough opportunities for former champions/current 'young professionals' to perform, to justify the amount of training (and thus commitment of time and effort) necessary to maintain the level of skating which is expected or hoped for, of that generation that had multi-city many-month tours (Browning, Yamaguchi - Stars on Ice 'hey day'). I too am "disappointed" by what is getting presented, but don't "expect" much different because of the circumstances.

  13. #13
    Gotta Have Music iluvtodd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    10,739
    I would have liked to see more of the pros perform, but we were still blown away by Paul Wylie & Brian Boitano (just majestic in both cases). What a treat to see Kitty & Peter again, and I was very pleased to see Nancy skate her 1994 Olympic short program.

  14. #14
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,270
    Quote Originally Posted by lcd View Post
    I think it comes down to the practical realities of professional skating today. There simply are not enough opportunities for former champions/current 'young professionals' to perform, to justify the amount of training (and thus commitment of time and effort) necessary to maintain the level of skating which is expected or hoped for, of that generation that had multi-city many-month tours (Browning, Yamaguchi - Stars on Ice 'hey day'). I too am "disappointed" by what is getting presented, but don't "expect" much different because of the circumstances.
    I thoroughly agree with this post. To be in good shape, a figure skater has to spend many hours on and off the ice. Many of the "younger" skaters have enrolled in college or have coaching jobs, etc. It really doesn't make sense to train all year for 1 or 2 shows.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •