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Thread: Are football fans subject to hysteria or just rich?

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    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    Are football fans subject to hysteria or just rich?

    I used to think that skating fans that spend $3500 to go to nats were a bit odd. But at least one gets 100 hours of entertainment and a nice hotel for nine nights....
    I am not into football or any ball game but I am being told to go to the Superbowl and see 4 hours of entertainment would probably run $2500 for a ticket, plus air fair
    plus hotels and food and this could easily run over $3500. Are all those people in the stadium rich, subject to hysteria or do they really think they get their money's worth?
    I have never been to the Olympics but this sport has got to be even more expensive per hour than even the Olys?????
    Chris hoping the domestic violence in homes stays down this year during the game

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    I used to think that skating fans that spend $3500 to go to nats were a bit odd. But at least one gets 100 hours of entertainment and a nice hotel for nine nights....
    I am not into football or any ball game but I am being told to go to the Superbowl and see 4 hours of entertainment would probably run $2500 for a ticket, plus air fair
    plus hotels and food and this could easily run over $3500. Are all those people in the stadium rich, subject to hysteria or do they really think they get their money's worth?
    I have never been to the Olympics but this sport has got to be even more expensive per hour than even the Olys?????
    Chris hoping the domestic violence in homes stays down this year during the game
    I think a lot of people who go to the Super Bowl are there to prove how privileged they are. A lot of that goes on here with college football. We know people with season tickets who have them because it is a status symbol and know little or nothing about the sport.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    My younger son went to a Superbowl-he was having a good year financially, his favorite team, the Patriots, were playing. The Patriots won that year. He still regards it as money well spent.

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    NFL games in general are expensive; its not just the tickets, but paying for parking, food and beverages --- the amount of money you spend on 1 game for 2 people is about the same that you will spend on a 40" flatscreen TV, which is a problem that a lot of stadiums are having now.

    They had several playoff games this year that were almost blacked out in their local markets. what that basically means, is the home team has to sell x number of tickets to the game or the local channel can't play the game.

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    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    Quite right and all is well that he regards the money well spent. Nothing wrong with that...nothing at all. I would say the same about that 4 grand I dropped on my first worlds..that was back when you got to see ALL the ladies...IIRC there were 50.
    I suppose it still all comes down to perspective. If I saw $4,000 on a table next to a voucher to a free ride to Worlds, which would I pick up? Which would a young father with a stay at home wife and a $30,000 a year job pick up? From my perspective, I would not pay $4,000 to see four hours of skating, not even if each and every pair or single skater was a favorite of mine, though it wouldn't change my standard of living one bit. But that is MY perspective. But it would be interesting to see the demographics of the attendees to the Superbowl. Is there a more expensive widely known spectator sporting event? Do people love it cause they love football or are they hyped into loving it? Is it all about marketing or a sport? I have no answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    My younger son went to a Superbowl-he was having a good year financially, his favorite team, the Patriots, were playing. The Patriots won that year. He still regards it as money well spent.

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    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    Well, that is certainly one side that is there. It is said that Jesse Jackson Jr. had 17 Rolex watches. Status seems to be a very big part of the lives of many.
    Just heard this from a motorcycling friend who lives out there....I did not research it but I don't doubt it....this is what George told me.

    "I live 3 miles from the stadium and a half mile from Teterboro airport. Teterboro is taking 400 private jets for the days before and after the game, by reservation only. About five other airports were mentioned to take on the overflow, as far away as Atlantic City, about 120 miles away. That's a LOT of private jets and a LOT of rich folks. One family of six people chartered their own 757. Yes, these are wealthy people that are coming to the game. "

    I have to wonder how many of those jets are owned by corporations and their use for a sporting event is not documented on the corporate taxes.....perhaps 60 minutes should be at Teterboro writing down tail numbers....
    This from CNBC today...
    "For Super Bowl week, New Jersey's Teterboro Airport is raising what might be considered a red-velvet rope around its airspace, requiring more than 1,000 private jets to vie for reserved spots just a few miles of MetLife Stadium.

    "Teterboro will be the crown jewel of where everyone wants to go," said Jeff Trance, the senior vice president of Air Partner (Private Jets North America,) which has Super Bowl packages from Denver starting at $36,000 and from Seattle for $64,000.


    "It's already one of the most complicated air spaces in the country," he said, and Super Bowl week will be exacerbated by an extra 1,200 planes and the possibility of severe weather delays. "If it's a rainy, snowy day, it's going to be a mess."

    (Read more: Las Vegas cashes in Super Bowl weekend)


    In addition, the Federal Aviation Administration has imposed a series of no-fly zones Feb. 2 that will shut down air traffic within an eight-mile radius of the stadium from about 4 p.m. until one hour after the game ends.

    Teterboro is in the game-day no-fly zone. Newark Liberty International Airport is just outside it and will not be affected, an FAA spokesman told CNBC.

    Planes arriving at Teterboro, Newark and Kennedy International from Jan. 29 through Feb. 3 will also need reservations and must pay an extra $250 to defray extra Super Bowl costs.

    Teterboro has only about 600 reservations for landing and plane parking spaces; all others will get "drop-and-go" access and will need to find parking at another air field, said Ron Marsico, spokesman for the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, which operates Teterboro."

    OK, that's it. I am NOT taking my private jet to Teterboro!!!



    Quote Originally Posted by louisa05 View Post
    I think a lot of people who go to the Super Bowl are there to prove how privileged they are. A lot of that goes on here with college football. We know people with season tickets who have them because it is a status symbol and know little or nothing about the sport.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    My younger son went to a Superbowl-he was having a good year financially, his favorite team, the Patriots, were playing. The Patriots won that year. He still regards it as money well spent.
    I want to clarify, doris, that I don't think status is the only reason people go. I'm sure there are many who are fans of a team playing or NFL fans in general. I just think that there exists a subset of people who go to high profile events because they can, not because they care about the event (a friend of mine at a Pink concert a couple of months ago is an example or some people I know who went to see George Strait's final tour here last week that have never listened to country in their lives). It is part of the reason that, years ago, U2 managed to get promoters to flip-flop tickets and the arena or stadium floors are now general admission while the pricey seats are up above. They were tired of playing with people who were not particularly interested in the front. (And I can completely admit that they may have aged beyond the problem now or soon enough).

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    and... World Peace! Tonichelle's Avatar
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    My uncle for years had season tickets to the 49er games - during the "glory days" of Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Steve Young, etc. It wasn't to flaunt money (they didn't have much), or because he fed into the hysteria (he was Niner faithful BEFORE the 80s, as well as all the way to today). I don't think he ever went to a Superbowl (I can't be sure) but Season Tickets in a box ain't cheap.

    It was something he enjoyed doing, and I know he can't be the only one. Heck if I had the $$ and my team was playing I'd go! But you don't know who's playing until a couple weeks out and that's not enough time to get decent airfare for me. I need time to plan. So I didn't try to go last year (though man that would've been awesome). Also can't get that time off as that's the same weekend as a major race for my boss' kennel... so *sigh*

    I'm sure some are wrapped up in the "IT'S THE SUPERBOWL" but I don't think all (or even the majority) are.



    Oh and (can't believe I'm typing this but) GO BRONCOS! Kill the Sea Chickens!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonichelle View Post
    My uncle for years had season tickets to the 49er games - during the "glory days" of Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Steve Young, etc. It wasn't to flaunt money (they didn't have much), or because he fed into the hysteria (he was Niner faithful BEFORE the 80s, as well as all the way to today). I don't think he ever went to a Superbowl (I can't be sure) but Season Tickets in a box ain't cheap.

    It was something he enjoyed doing, and I know he can't be the only one. Heck if I had the $$ and my team was playing I'd go! But you don't know who's playing until a couple weeks out and that's not enough time to get decent airfare for me. I need time to plan. So I didn't try to go last year (though man that would've been awesome). Also can't get that time off as that's the same weekend as a major race for my boss' kennel... so *sigh*

    I'm sure some are wrapped up in the "IT'S THE SUPERBOWL" but I don't think all (or even the majority) are.



    Oh and (can't believe I'm typing this but) GO BRONCOS! Kill the Sea Chickens!
    Again, I said a subset. But I think that at really expensive events like the Super Bowl, that subset is larger than at a regular season game. It is the same phenomenon as a 42 year old woman whose favorite music includes Garth Brooks and the Beach Boys needing to go see Pink because she is opening a new arena and all the "cool kids" are going.

    Also, I agree. Go Broncos. And I can't believe I'm saying it either. But I saw it coming as soon as Peyton went there. I've been a fan since he was a senior at Tennessee--which says a lot as they played my team for a national title that year--only time I've rooted against him.

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    Celebrating the Excellence of #VirtueMoir golden411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    I have to wonder how many of those jets are owned by corporations and their use for a sporting event is not documented on the corporate taxes.....perhaps 60 minutes should be at Teterboro writing down tail numbers....
    Yes, I do believe that for the Super Bowl (and maybe for regular-season NFL games?), many, many tickets, VIP boxes, etc., are paid for by corporations or by expense accounts. I do not have any hard data, but my guess is that a large number of attendees (I have no clue of the proportion) would not be willing or able to cough up thousands of dollars of their own money, but they are happy to be guests of some entity that is footing their bill.

    My impression is that for many attendees, the Super Bowl hoopla has become more about the overall "scene" -- meaning enjoying a lot of partying and entertainment in the days surrounding the game itself, which is only secondary. Surely the hospitality/tourism industry in the local area makes millions and millions of dollars extra every year during this period.

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    There are people in this world who pay 500 bucks for a pocket watch, 1000 for a smoking and 100.000 for a car. You don't need to understand their reasons, but for them those investments are worth it.

    I have been to a few Superbowls and to me it was great fun. That said, I also spend a lot of money on FS, Athletics or any other sport & music events. Its not about proving something, because I am a very modest person and don't own cars, houses, clothes of big labels or anything that could be seen as a status or show off thing.
    For me going to such events is fun and I know how fast a life can end, so I want to enjoy these things as long I can, others smoke and drink which I don't do - so we all have our stories I guess

    Personally, I see a big danger in making tickets unaffordable for the "non rich" - look at Stockholm next year, almost 600 bucks for the Euro´s, its crazy :( How is a family from Lithuania or Poland supposed to pay for that to see their daughter or friend skate?

    But also the Olympics are more and more for the rich, I saw it at so many games in the past. Empty seat´s, but in advance astronomic prices for seat´s which are not located directly under the roof. When I was at Athens, empty halls, also London had empty rows :(

    As sad it may sound, but I am quite sure we are not yet at the end of the road. Tickets will cost more and more in future :(

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    I am being told to go to the Superbowl and see 4 hours of entertainment would probably run $2500 for a ticket
    FWIW, last night on our local NJ News and the major network newscasts from NYC, it was reported that secondary market tickets (such as StubHub) have been reduced to around $1,500.00 each.

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    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonichelle View Post
    Oh and (can't believe I'm typing this but) GO BRONCOS! Kill the Sea Chickens!
    Not to pick on Toni but this brings back so many memories on why I hate many sports...the negativeness... and violence.
    Most people at skating events don't riot after an event. There is very little domestic violence if ones skater doesn't do well. Very few folk in the arena have signs that say, "Kill the Russians". Few people throw full beer cups at skaters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    Not to pick on Toni but this brings back so many memories on why I hate many sports...the negativeness... and violence.
    Most people at skating events don't riot after an event. There is very little domestic violence if ones skater doesn't do well. Very few folk in the arena have signs that say, "Kill the Russians". Few people throw full beer cups at skaters.
    Because skating is not a contact sport, remarkably less alcohol is consumed at a skating event and it is a niche sport which prevents rioting--a riot requires numbers.

    I think that skating fans have their own issues. And many are just as fanatical as football fans just in different ways. There are people on the popular forums who are too emotionally affected by the performances of their favorites. I recall a poster lamenting that Alissa Czisny's poor performance at Worlds (when she was injured no less) had ruined her entire year--and given that she posted it nearly a year later, it didn't seem to be hyperbole. The arguments and accusations that fly when someone criticizes someone else's favorite here (and even more so on another board) are not much different than the arguments I see raging in social media over issues surrounding our much obsessed over local division one college football team.

    In short, all sports have crazy fans. The NFL just has wider popular appeal so their crazy fans are more visible.

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    Custom Title CoyoteChris's Avatar
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    I would certainly agree that sports such as football, soccer, basketball, hockey, etc...especially the more violent ones, seem to draw a different type of person, although making generalizations is dangerous. Soccer is not as violent as some sports but the fans are way violent in many countries. I am told by friends that the English are very abusive verbally at their soccer games. I think sports such as golf and skating draw a different crowd than NASCAR and Football...and personality type does play a role. But it is the folk that cross over that are interesting to me....gentile folk who wouldn't say poop if they had a mouthful and who help others cheerfully constantly and have good manners who love hockey.
    Chris who isn't going to the coluseaum tonight....(Lions, 2, Gladiators 0)
    Quote Originally Posted by louisa05 View Post
    Because skating is not a contact sport, remarkably less alcohol is consumed at a skating event and it is a niche sport which prevents rioting--a riot requires numbers.

    I think that skating fans have their own issues. And many are just as fanatical as football fans just in different ways. There are people on the popular forums who are too emotionally affected by the performances of their favorites. I recall a poster lamenting that Alissa Czisny's poor performance at Worlds (when she was injured no less) had ruined her entire year--and given that she posted it nearly a year later, it didn't seem to be hyperbole. The arguments and accusations that fly when someone criticizes someone else's favorite here (and even more so on another board) are not much different than the arguments I see raging in social media over issues surrounding our much obsessed over local division one college football team.

    In short, all sports have crazy fans. The NFL just has wider popular appeal so their crazy fans are more visible.

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