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Thread: Skaters who revolutionized/made an impact in Figure Skating

  1. #136
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    Ice Dance
    Tessa and Scott & Meryl and Charlie have taken Ice Dance to new heights. They made ice dance so exciting and they helped raised the standard of dance by making those below them chase after them. From the 90s- platov, grishuk, Zhulin and Ussova and Krylova made a big impact

    For pairs- the chinese pairs program- Shen/Zhao, Pang/Tong etc. as well as russian classics like G/G and B/S
    It also must be said that Sale/Pelletier made an impact because they got caught in the 02 scandal but that is another can of worms that nobody wants to reopen.

  2. #137
    Custom Title Franklin99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodlepal
    Excellent skaters I don't think were revolutionaries:
    Yuna--she's the best of her generation, but didn't do anything that much different than anyone else
    Mao--along with Kimmie, did the triple-axel without being a powerhouse like Tonya or Midori--but I don't know if she's a revolutionary.
    Alexei Yagudin, Evgeni Plushenko, Shizuka Arakawa, etc.--excellent gold medallists, but not revolutionaries
    Davis and White--can't tell. They might be or they might be just the fastest and twizzliest of the fast/twizzly ice dancing era.
    Virtue/Moir--definitely not. Someone said they brought romance back, but Sale and Pelletier and the 2006 Canadians also did romantic themes.
    Patrick Chan/Hanyu--almost started a trend of winning while skating badly. Let's hope it doesn't catch on!

    Quote Originally Posted by Meoima View Post
    - Yuna: I agree. Her consistency is incredible but not revolutionary. Still, it's to die for.
    - Mao: Not sure. But I suppose there will be more ladies with 3A from now on. I suppose she has influence somehow.
    - Alexei Yagudin, Evgeni Plushenko: excuse me!!! if these 2 are not revolutionary, then who else? They are the best of their generation. They push each other so much, at the same time they push figure skating to a new barrier. Their dramatic program, their jumps, their footworks!!!
    By consistently putting a 3a in her SP during the 2009-2010 season, didn't Mao have a big effect on the rule change in the ladies SP by allowing the 3a to be used without adding a 2a, as opposed to having to do both 2a and 3a in the sp. Tonya didn't have that effect. Kimmie didn't effect the rule change. Neither did the incomparable Midori Ito, who was the best and most consistent 3A jumper, ever caused the judges to change the rules in regards to the 3A. That to me is revolutionary. Mao may not be the best 3A jumper, but she did have a BIG effect in the ladies competition with that jump:

    1. The first lady to successfully land 3 3axels in a competition.
    2. The first to effect the rule change in the ladies SP regarding 3A.
    3. The first lady to land 8 triples with a 3A in the LP.

  3. #138
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    [QUOTE=Cherryy;917215]I think that Sasha needs to be put on this list. She was probably the first one to promote flexibility and innovative spins so strongly. It was only after her that I-spin became so popular and it's clearly visible she inspired many skaters. Kiri Baga had just the same short program to Dark Eyes, Fumie had similar clothes, Julia's music choices especially in the 2011-13 seasons were clearly inspired by Sasha. I would say many young skaters followed her path and these are just some examples.

    Many say that Mao made an impact but even though I truly love her, I would sadly say she didn't make much of an impact. Maybe after some time we will see more ladies trying the 3axel or in general programs with the highest difficulty level possible. As of now I think Kim is the one that had a bigger impact, as somebody already wrote, now most girls are relying on their 3Lz-3T, which became a standard combination for top female skaters partly because of Yuna.

    The same with Midori - yes, she and Asada were pushing the technical envolope but who was in fact inspired by Ito? Well, except for Mao :
    Quote Originally Posted by Cherryy View Post
    I think that Sasha needs to be put on this list. She was probably the first one to promote flexibility and innovative spins so strongly. It was only after her that I-spin became so popular and it's clearly visible she inspired many skaters. Kiri Baga had just the same short program to Dark Eyes, Fumie had similar clothes, Julia's music choices especially in the 2011-13 seasons were clearly inspired by Sasha. I would say many young skaters followed her path and these are just some examples.

    Many say that Mao made an impact but even though I truly love her, I would sadly say she didn't make much of an impact. Maybe after some time we will see more ladies trying the 3axel or in general programs with the highest difficulty level possible. As of now I think Kim is the one that had a bigger impact, as somebody already wrote, now most girls are relying on their 3Lz-3T, which became a standard combination for top female skaters partly because of Yuna.

    The same with Midori - yes, she and Asada were pushing the technical envolope but who was in fact inspired by Ito? Well, except for Mao

    I'm not trying to diminish their achievements, as both Mao and Midori are my favourite skaters but it seems to me that sadly not many people follow their path.
    As if 3Lz-3T were not landed before Yuna came. The only thing she revolutionized was getting +3 GOE on every element. I supposed getting super inflated GOE to BV ratio is considered revolutionary.

  4. #139
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    I feel that Sasha Cohen was not mentioned enough here. Sasha brought gymnastics into FS and did so with a balletic grace and elegance. Her moves have been copied endlessly since. In my book it is innovation.

    Another lady skater I wish to mention is Elena Vodorezova. I risk to be politically incorrect (she is after all the coach of Adelina!) but where Soviet FS concerned she was a revolutionary no doubt. She was the first Soviet woman to win a European (1978) & World (1983) medals ever. Some might not remember that but for a very long time despite dominance of Soviet skaters in all other disciplines the ladies failed miserably. Elena was the first to break through and others followed. She was the first skater to complete a double flip, triple toe loop combination in competition. She was noted for a spectacularly high double axel. Some remember her as an ‘original jumping machine’ before Midori and others. Russian Wikipedia credits her with other four records as follows:
    Triple jump in short program (1976)
    Triple jump in combination (1976) (3 toeloop – double flip and double flip – triple toeloop)
    Three triples in long program (2 toe loops and salchow) (1976)
    Triple loop in the World Championship (1978)

    There is no mention of those in English version of Wiki - I guess these records were not ratified but if anyone can comment on that, it would be interesting.
    Here is a link to her lp in 1978 Worlds – her last appearance before her illness (juvenile arthritis) took over and robbed her of jumpong ability

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlopVpUPAQY

  5. #140
    Landing 3As in my dreams! skatedreamer's Avatar
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    Not to take anything away from Sasha but for those who haven't already done so, please do take a look @ this video posted a few days ago (#131 in this thread) by a new GS member. The skater is Belita Jepson-Turner, who skated for Britain in the 1936 Olympics. She was a mere 12 years old at the time and placed 16th behind Sonja Henie. There are aspects of her style that look a bit dated now (JMO), but the gorgeous spiral at the end is simply timeless -- a prototype for Sasha and for Michelle, too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDvAFbi-ats

    Jepson-Turner died in 2005. Below is her obit from The Telegraph (UK); she must have been a fascinating woman.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obit...on-Turner.html

    Hope everyone enjoys. Also, very special thanks again and welcome to Neverdull45!
    Last edited by skatedreamer; 04-25-2014 at 10:33 AM. Reason: name of UK newspaper; correction

  6. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by melissa_ire View Post
    Her moves have been copied endlessly since.
    Can I ask what moves? Nicole Bobek was the one who started the trend of near split spirals that was then imitated by Kwan and Cohen. Kwan was winning championships while reviving the Charlotte after it hadn't been used in decades long before Cohen, the Biellman spin was being done on both feet by Irina Slutskaya (and is of course associated with Denise).
    So besides this general idea of Cohen popularizing flexibility it's really only the I-spin's ubiquitousness that maybe can be attributed to her. Cohen probably embodied the modern peak of a flexible baby ballerina, but she didn't innovate it, it was a culmination of a lot of skaters before her.

  7. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by GF2445 View Post
    Ice Dance
    Tessa and Scott & Meryl and Charlie have taken Ice Dance to new heights. They made ice dance so exciting and they helped raised the standard of dance by making those below them chase after them.
    I think that their most important credit is making IJS-Ice Dance decent to watch, before them it was frankly horrible

  8. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by FSGMT View Post
    I think that their most important credit is making IJS-Ice Dance decent to watch, before them it was frankly horrible
    Well, personally it's making ice dance in general decent to watch from a sport standpoint. I never got the "sport" of ice dance, and it was all about the theatrics and expression. Now there is concrete difficulty and discernable ways to separate the teams beyond more subtle things like edge work and speed. Lesser teams (like C/B) can still rack up difficulty and contend with more popular teams, and that's a good thing. It's good that the standings aren't as predictable. I bet I/K would have been placed 3rd at Worlds after the SD under 6.0 to save their gold.

  9. #144
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    What is considered "revolutionary?"
    To me, there are three categories of excellent skaters
    1. Really good skaters, the best of their era--but more or less did the standard things.
    2. Really good skaters who did more than the standard things--but nobody or few others could do them, didn't really influence anyone else
    3. Really good skaters who actually did something nobody else did and now everyone tries to copy them
    4. Skaters who enacted some sort of rule change.

    I would say that most skaters are in group 1
    Tara Lipinski, with her triple loop/triple loop would be in group 2. Also any female who does an axel (with the exception maybe of Mao Asada, who I didn't know had a rule in the short program altered because of her)
    Michelle Kwan I would put in group 3, because she introduced or reintroduced the soft, tasteful skating style we see today, compared to the more brassy "showgirl" style of the 80's and 90's.
    Someone like Elaine Zayak and Janet Lynn would be in group 4.

  10. #145
    Outdated Old Dinosaur
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    This is an interesting topic. I've scanned all the posts so far, and there's one name that hasn't been mentioned:

    Robin Cousins.

    Now, personally, I prefer the classical style of John Curry, but no doubt Cousins revolutionized the sport by introducing modern dance movements and styling.

    While it could be argued that Toller Cranston opened the door in this regard, Robin Cousins kicked it off the hinges.

  11. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by pangtongfan View Post
    I would say Torvill & Dean definititely revolutionized dance. They were the first to really create the theme based programs and pull them off so effectively, yet still mantain the highest technical level with it.

    The first to create the theme based program were Moiseeva-Minenkov with the Westside Story FD in 1977-78

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