Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 146

Thread: Skaters who revolutionized/made an impact in Figure Skating

  1. #61
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by Kwanford Wife View Post
    Tonya Harding & Nicole Bobeck... bad girls? yes. Impactful? absolutely. why? 3 axel and spiral.
    Bobek

  2. #62
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    912
    Quote Originally Posted by Kwanford Wife View Post
    Tonya Harding & Nicole Bobeck... bad girls? yes. Impactful? absolutely. why? 3 axel and spiral.
    Harding certainly helped raised media attention in the sport to a fever pitch. I would argue that Ito had a bigger impact re: 3A, although both Tonya's and Nicole's were also fantastic.

  3. #63
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,686
    I don't think Davis and White or Hanyu revolutionalized skating - in fact Chan or Dai really started the complete skater or even Lambiel or Buttle. Hanyu was a follower of Chan - technical and skating skills and his skills aren't of the magnificient level of Lambiel, Buttle or chan who probably had the best skating skills and transitions for men. G and G had it all so maybe they "revolutionized skating. Gary Beacom did some amazing tricks never seen. Hydroblading by Bourne and Kraatz. I think D and W did no more for skating than V and M. Neither team really had the magic of Torvill and Dean or Klimova and Pomarenko. Shen and /zhou maybe revolutionized skating for China but not world - the Russians were doing big lifts and throws already. Duhamel and radford really pushing the envelope for big individual jumps in pairs. I agree Ito pushed the jumps and then maybe ugly and criticized as they would be under COP Surya Bonaly. Baiul maybe was the start of the youth movement - Hughes, Lipinski, Lipnskaya, Sotnikova, Gold, Nagasu, Mao, Radinova, Tuk. Brian Orser really pushed the technical elements then fire was fueled by Boitano.

  4. #64
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,864
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandpiper View Post
    @WeakAnkles
    I understand what you're saying. Attempts at recreating magic with only the base elements often results in tediousness. I may not be an expert in ice dance, but it's the same in any art or performance. Just look at novels, movies, TV, storytelling in general...

    I meant the question more like--even if I/K were competing under 6.0, wouldn't their routines be equally tedious to you? And they'll probably win more, which will create more drama! skates, which will probably make ice dance even more annoying for you. It seems like you simply prefer COP ice dance over 6.0 ice dance. (Apologies if I'm reading you wrong though). Of course, I'm one of those people who doesn't think the best COP-points-getter is necessary the best skate; if that were true, we wouldn't have tweaks to the judging system all the time.
    I'm with CSG--I think COP has done wonders for ice dancing, much more so than for any other discipline. Of course it has drawbacks--any judging system will. But the benefits, for me at least, have far outweighed the problems. And a new judging system is going to make you look at skating from a new perspective. Under 6.0, because there were single scores for the athletic (technical) and the artistic, I tended to look at programs as whole entities. But because COP looks at every single component and scores it individually, I now look at things like how difficult and how well-performed each individual component is. And that's when I noticed that, under all of I/K's dramatic balletic flourishes, the tech content was pretty watered-down compared to the other top teams. I think gkelly said it: he takes her hand and she turns, she takes his hand and he turns. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

    Ziggy, who really knows his stuff about ID, also said something I found very interesting: that you'll find more interesting programs from lower ranked teams because they are trying to make an impression on the judges. And I think that's true. Look at Hurtado and Diaz, for instance, or Gilles and Poirier. Two of the best FDs last year. So I agree that the best-COP-point-generating programs aren't always necessarily the best. But COP has made Ice Dancing at least, much more interesting and, for all the judging controversies, much more fair than it ever was under 6.0, where you pretty much knew where every couple would place before their blades hit the ice.

    But I think for me ALL of figure skating is a sport first. It may be as artsy-fartsy as all get out, but it is still primarily a sport. And I've seen too many teams over the years that try to cover their athletic shortcomings with big dollops of Drama (yes Fusar-Poli and Margaglio, I'm looking at you). And the periods where this is rewarded by the judges tend to be the periods where I simply am not as engaged or interested as a fan. But YMMV, of course.

  5. #65
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,686
    WEll I guess Chan started the push for tech excellency and skating skills and Hanyu took it to the next step - but that is debatable I think we can say Hanyu better technicain but skating skill wise Chan wold or should win on most days. I sense Sky fly for some reason the posts tend to put down Canadian skaters = that is just an observatin as skyfly tend sto like Hanyu over Chan and Davis and White over v and m and has had several negative posts about Osmond. I am not say skyflyy is anticanadian but that is just an observation of skyflys prefernces. And we should respect they are sky fly's preferences still I see spikydurian's perspective too and I tend to agree more but really I think a lot of these posts are because we miss competitive skating lol. What's next whose hairstyle we like best. Which skater has the cutest pet?

  6. #66
    still fangirling for Toller... el henry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Christmas City, USA
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I don't want to get into an argument over specific choices, but this thread is a great way to think of skaters, and I like that you go back practically to the start of competitive skating rather than concentrating just on the recent past. Definitely Toller Cranston and Janet Lynn need to be on this list, because though they never won an international gold medal, they helped to usher in the era of more expressive skating. Cranston shares that distinction with his almost exact contemporary, John Curry, and Lynn probably can be thought of in conjunction with Peggy Fleming.

    For the ice dancers, I'll leave it to better informed people (or just more emphatic people!) to argue, except to say that Torvill and Dean most assuredly do belong on this list.
    Absolutely right to those who have mentioned these three. Many of the skaters argued about here simply have not been skating long enough to "revolutionize the sport". That needs the long view.

    Janet Lynn: how many of you have watched skaters tracing figure eights on the rink as part of Olympic competition? You haven't? I have, and you have Janet Lynn to thank for the fact that you do not. *That* is revolutionary, not a step sequence or a spin or a jump. Changing the way we watch figure skating.

    Toller Cranston: every male figure skater who has skated since owes a debt to Cranston. Either they incorporated (or tried) artistry and wonder and innovation into their skating, or, as a backlash, they tried athleticism. Cranston was a skater who made you watch, and not because he was going to do a jump with a bunch of letters and initials. He was compelling.

    Torvill and Dean: Also compelling. They tried a new concept, and they succeeded. Almost entirely due to Torvill and Dean, ice dancing became respected.

    There is no way to say that about skaters who are still skating. They may revolutionize; they may not, time will tell. But if you don't know about Lynn, Cranston or Torvill and Dean, I am afraid to say you probably don't know enough to say.

  7. #67
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    4,960
    Weakankles/skaterboy, that's a perfect assessment. Buttle without a quad started a push for all around skating and utilizing the system that way. Then Chan with his quads did the same and blew everyone out of the water and dominated. And now Hanyu has followed suit and is in the process of taking it to a new level. I'd say Fernandez is also to be commended for his 3 quad skates that still sell a program and incorporate intricate content and character, while still being technically ambitious.

  8. #68
    Keeper of the Kweens OGM. MK's Winter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    718
    Trixie Schuba should also be added. She was the Master of figures.

  9. #69
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,864
    Quote Originally Posted by el henry View Post
    Absolutely right to those who have mentioned these three. Many of the skaters argued about here simply have not been skating long enough to "revolutionize the sport". That needs the long view.

    Janet Lynn: how many of you have watched skaters tracing figure eights on the rink as part of Olympic competition? You haven't? I have, and you have Janet Lynn to thank for the fact that you do not. *That* is revolutionary, not a step sequence or a spin or a jump. Changing the way we watch figure skating.

    Toller Cranston: every male figure skater who has skated since owes a debt to Cranston. Either they incorporated (or tried) artistry and wonder and innovation into their skating, or, as a backlash, they tried athleticism. Cranston was a skater who made you watch, and not because he was going to do a jump with a bunch of letters and initials. He was compelling.

    Torvill and Dean: Also compelling. They tried a new concept, and they succeeded. Almost entirely due to Torvill and Dean, ice dancing became respected.

    There is no way to say that about skaters who are still skating. They may revolutionize; they may not, time will tell. But if you don't know about Lynn, Cranston or Torvill and Dean, I am afraid to say you probably don't know enough to say.


    I was thinking of pairs and frankly, there really hasn't been any team that could be called revolutionary since the Protopopovs. I mention them because you didn't cover Pairs. But otherwise, spot on.

  10. #70
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    306
    Michelle Kwan is one of the first Asian-American female athletes to be truly embraced by the American public (in a time when Asian-American media and cultural representation was far worse than it is today, and it's still severely lacking), and remains one of the most iconic female minority athletes in US history..she carried the torch that was passed on to her from Kristi Yamaguchi, and to a lesser extent, Tiffany Chin.
    Ultimately, she became beloved by the skating community and general public in a way that her 2 predecessors never had been (although I think she definitely benefited from the inroads they made).

    It speaks volumes that a woman of minority descent became the face of her sport (and during its golden age), especially when skating has had a distinguished legacy in the US going back almost a century.

  11. #71
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    165
    I don't know, but I loved Anisina/Peizerat for wonderful innovations and Philipe Candeloro for bringing theatre on ice...They may not be the best but, I really miss them.

  12. #72
    Shoe Diva
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Detroit, MI - So Glad to be Home!
    Posts
    2,837
    Quote Originally Posted by CezarMart View Post
    Bobek
    touché, pussycat

    Quote Originally Posted by pointyourtoe View Post
    Michelle Kwan is one of the first Asian-American female athletes to be truly embraced by the American public (in a time when Asian-American media and cultural representation was far worse than it is today, and it's still severely lacking), and remains one of the most iconic female minority athletes in US history..she carried the torch that was passed on to her from Kristi Yamaguchi, and to a lesser extent, Tiffany Chin.
    Ultimately, she became beloved by the skating community and general public in a way that her 2 predecessors never had been (although I think she definitely benefited from the inroads they made).

    It speaks volumes that a woman of minority descent became the face of her sport (and during its golden age), especially when skating has had a distinguished legacy in the US going back almost a century.
    I would agree with this and then add Debbie Thomas to the conversation. As a 12 year old, I remember when my coach told my mom that my body had outgrown the sport and that body type was why we'd never have a black female skating champion. Three years later, Debbie Thomas hit the scene and for this black girl that was way impactful... I know she went on to having a great life outside of skating, but I always think what could've been if she'd stayed around another quad...

  13. #73
    On the Ice
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by el henry View Post
    Absolutely right to those who have mentioned these three. Many of the skaters argued about here simply have not been skating long enough to "revolutionize the sport". That needs the long view.

    Janet Lynn: how many of you have watched skaters tracing figure eights on the rink as part of Olympic competition? You haven't? I have, and you have Janet Lynn to thank for the fact that you do not. *That* is revolutionary, not a step sequence or a spin or a jump. Changing the way we watch figure skating.

    Toller Cranston: every male figure skater who has skated since owes a debt to Cranston. Either they incorporated (or tried) artistry and wonder and innovation into their skating, or, as a backlash, they tried athleticism. Cranston was a skater who made you watch, and not because he was going to do a jump with a bunch of letters and initials. He was compelling.

    Torvill and Dean: Also compelling. They tried a new concept, and they succeeded. Almost entirely due to Torvill and Dean, ice dancing became respected.

    There is no way to say that about skaters who are still skating. They may revolutionize; they may not, time will tell. But if you don't know about Lynn, Cranston or Torvill and Dean, I am afraid to say you probably don't know enough to say.
    Well said and add Tai and Randy !

  14. #74
    Custom Title BlackPack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,036
    gracie

  15. #75
    - * - blue_idealist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,770
    Quote Originally Posted by CezarMart View Post
    That's right! She was the first skater ever to pose nude! And that is a HUGE historical breakthrough! lol
    Nobody did it before and very very few after. Tanja Szewczenko was one of them. Actually she might be the only one...
    I read in a skating book that Maria Butyrskaya was in Playboy, although I don't recall if she was nude. She may not have been since I don't think they explicitly said she was, or I'd probably remember.

Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •