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Thread: Which country will be the next to have a gold in history in each skating discipline

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    Which country will be the next to have a gold in history in each skating discipline

    Now that Russia is officialy the first country to ever win an Olympic gold in each skating discipline which country will be the next? Right now the U.S lacks only pairs. Canada lacks only men. France I believe lack only ladies. Germany lacks only dance I believe. Britian lacks only the pairs. Austria lacks only the ice dancing gold. So that is atleast 6 countries with 3 out of 4. So who will be next, and how far into the future might it be.

    Also should we now add needing the team gold to complete that set.

    I think it will be a long time, perhaps atleast 20 years, before any country joins the club. I dont see a pairs gold for the U.S on the horizon. Canada could win a mens gold with someone like Nguyen or another up and comer, but not sure it will happen. We do still have a strong mens program going though. So Canada is probably the most likely. France does not look likely to do it in ladies anytime soon. The other countries seem out of gold contention in any event for the moment, other than possibly Germany in pairs.

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    I'll vote for Canada, none of the others have a shot imo because the discipline they each lack doesn't seem to be very popular or promising in the lacking country. I think it may be a while, if ever, for Canada though. Also, who were the french pair to win gold?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Risa View Post
    I'll vote for Canada, none of the others have a shot imo because the discipline they each lack doesn't seem to be very popular or promising in the lacking country. I think it may be a while, if ever, for Canada though. Also, who were the french pair to win gold?
    Pierre Brunet and his wife Andrée Joly-Brunet, double Olympic champions back in 1928 and 1932. No Frenchman nor Frenchwoman has ever won in Men's or Ladies' singles, though: the best achievements are a silver medal (Alain Calmat 1964) and a bronze medal (Jacqueline du Bief 1952)

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    I say the US. We already have golds in Ladies, Men's and Dance. The only Olympic Gold missing is Pairs. Though I don't know how soon it will come. I don't really follow pairs anymore, but as I understand the US pairs field is not that deep right now and probably won't be anytime soon.

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    Yeah, Canada is probably going to do it next, and it may be Nguyen. I think Nguyen has a better chance of winning gold in 2018 than any of the current US pairs. It would take some team really shooting up the ranks or a totally new team blowing everyone out of the water for the US to get a pairs gold. Britain doesn't even have any pairs in which both partners are currently citizens, Meite won't win gold in 2018, and Z/G won't either, if they even continue that long. I can't even remember the current top Austrian dance team! ETA: According to Euros results, it's Silna/Kurakin. Wouldn't have known.

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    All countries had to wait for Russia's fail, because with current rules I can't see them to lost Olympic Team Gold Medal. Canada close with team and mens gold. I can't see USA getting team gold over both Russia and Canada.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    I would have thought Canada would have a men's gold by now, with so many wonderful candidates for that first medal over the years-can Canada learn not to put so much pressure on their next gold medal worthy man? If so, they will be the next.


    So many countries are lacking the pairs or dance medal, but I wonder whether the existence of the team medal will change the entire landscape in pairs and dance. Countries that never seemed to have a pairs or dance program will now have one. The extra competition will make it harder for all the countries, but ultimately will promote the rise of new stars, too. In pairs or dance, it seems to require a much larger national support system than singles for a winning team to arise, favoring richer federations.

    Already Japan has a pair or two when previously it had none at all, and has one or two more senior dancers than before. US pairs routinely break up before they reach top levels, but perhaps that will happen less often. Not only is there a chance for a team medal for a middle level team, the countries/federations may actually give more support to teams than they have in the past because they want a shot at a team medal.

    If Canada doesn't manage the feat next, Japan might get all its 2 missing medals first. There is a lot of support and a lot of great skaters there. It took Igor Shpilband what, about 20 years, to build a dance program that could yield a first gold medal, so I would guess it is 15 or twenty years away. The same kind of timeline, I would think, to develop a good pairs program (cf. Yao Bin). OTOH, a phenomenal single skater could arise any time. So if not Canada, then 16 years and the answer is Japan.
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 04-20-2014 at 05:03 AM.

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    a cat watching figure skating alebi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    I would have thought Canada would have a men's gold by now, with so many wonderful candidates for that first medal over the years-can Canada learn not to put so much pressure on their next gold medal worthy man? If so, they will be the next.


    So many countries are lacking the pairs or dance medal, but I wonder whether the existence of the team medal will change the entire landscape in pairs and dance. Countries that never seemed to have a pairs or dance program will now have one. The extra competition will make it harder for all the countries, but ultimately will promote the rise of new stars, too. In pairs or dance, it seems to require a much larger national support system than singles for a winning team to arise, favoring richer federations.

    Already Japan has a pair or two when previously it had none at all, and has one or two more senior dancers than before. US pairs routinely break up before they reach top levels, but perhaps that will happen less often. Not only is there a chance for a team medal for a middle level team, the countries/federations may actually give more support to teams than they have in the past because they want a shot at a team medal.

    If Canada doesn't manage the feat next, Japan might get all its 2 missing medals first. There is a lot of support and a lot of great skaters there. It took Igor Shpilband what, about 20 years, to build a dance program that could yield a first gold medal, so I would guess it is 15 or twenty years away. The same kind of timeline, I would think, to develop a good pairs program (cf. Yao Bin). OTOH, a phenomenal single skater could arise any time. So if not Canada, then 16 years and the answer is Japan.
    The problem is IF Japan FED wants to develop the two missing disciplines and honestly I still don't see this will. They should bring foreign teachers and "relocate" a good amount of their young skaters (who won't emerge in a so deep field) to see the first results... Just a couple of two done in emergency (T/K) isn't the right way to create a strong base (especially if they still "import" foreign skaters who will never get the naturalization)

    Canada is the next for sure for tradition and deep field

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    I was going to put Ukraine on the list, because of Baiul and Petrenko, but then I realized that Petrenko still represented the USSR. So they have just one of the four. Ironically, the two top pairs going into this Olympics, V/T and S/S, had Ukrainian women as one of the partners.

    I pin my hopes on Canada. They have had so many great men's singles champions through the years, and it's just heartbreaking that none of these guys have made that final step up to the top of the podium. There are those who believe that Orser really should have been the winner in 1984, and he would have been except that school figures scores were weighted so heavily in the calculations; or that Stojko should have been preferred over Urmanov in 1994. Which is all to say that they already have the potential to have a men's Olympic champion; they don't have to wait ten or twenty years while a new program develops a generation of top skaters, as the U.S. might need to do with pairs or Japan with pairs and ice dance. Maybe SkateCanada could just hire a wizard or a shaman to break the Canadian Curse.

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    Gadfly and Bon Vivant Mafke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I was going to put Ukraine on the list, because of Baiul and Petrenko, but then I realized that Petrenko still represented the USSR. So they have just one of the four. Ironically, the two top pairs going into this Olympics, V/T and S/S, had Ukrainian women as one of the partners.
    Technically Petrenko won gold as a member of the "unified team" under the flag of the IOC (since the USSR had dissolved by the beginning of the games)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified...inter_Olympics

    It's not clear at all if Ukraine will ever have a winter olympic team again, given Russia's territorial ambitions there.

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    Oh, thanks, Mafke--I forgot that this was the year of the Unified Team.

    Yes, your comment about the Ukraine at present is agonizingly accurate, but I have to hope for their future. After all, did we ever expect countries such as Georgia and Azerbaijan to have their own Olympic representation in our lifetimes? And yet they do.

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    No its actually Russophobic nonsense.

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    Canada has been strong in the men's competition for decades now. We've had titans in the discipline almost nonstop for quite a while. It's only a matter of time before we actually end up snagging the gold. Nguyen is young. He's 15. We can't tell how he will do four years from now - he will be a LOT different. The kid doesn't even have a quad yet. For now, I see promise. A lot of promise. I won't be so silly as to consider him a gold medal contender yet, but I have my eye on him. Who was the junior world champion four years ago? Yeah... Yuzuru Hanyu.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kresslia View Post
    Nguyen is young. He's 15. We can't tell how he will do four years from now - he will be a LOT different. The kid doesn't even have a quad yet. For now, I see promise. A lot of promise. I won't be so silly as to consider him a gold medal contender yet, but I have my eye on him. Who was the junior world champion four years ago? Yeah... Yuzuru Hanyu.
    And who was the ladies world junior champ four years ago? Kanako Murakami.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kresslia View Post
    Canada has been strong in the men's competition for decades now. We've had titans in the discipline almost nonstop for quite a while. It's only a matter of time before we actually end up snagging the gold.
    That's the thing about Canadian men. They have not just been out there. More often than not, they've been among the class of the field. Toller Cranston was one of the most important landmark skaters of modern times. Kurt Browning was and is one of the best skaters ever in so many aspects of skating, from technical quality to musical expression to versatility. Orser was in the top two for several Olympic cycles, as was Stojko. Buttle and Chan have been world champions. Well, all of the aforementioned men except for Cranston have been world champions. So whatever it is that leads to excellence in a discipline, the Canadians have had it since at least the 1970s in an almost unbroken line. There has to be an OGM in their future at some point soon!

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