Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Results 91 to 102 of 102

Thread: Recommend A Book to a GS friend

  1. #91
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Eleanor H Porter: "Pollyanna" (Re-read) - I really do enjoy reading a feel good book - it makes me feel good, and I enjoy feeling good. Actually, the glad game is harder than one could think - at least I found it so when as a child I was inspired by the book to try it. But then, being quick-tempered and irritable doesn't really help.

    Mrs Snow had lived forty years, and for fifteen of those years she had been too busy wishing things were different to find much time to enjoy things as they were.

    (I miss Olympia. She asked me to tell her what I thought of the book when I'd re-read it. I did reply, and I was pretty right in how I'd feel about it as it turns out - but I'd forgotten how funny it was!)

  2. #92
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Staring at the ocean and smiling.
    Posts
    22,871

    0 Not allowed!
    The humor in children's / young adults' books often is more appreciated by the adults in the reading audience.

    I missed half of Marilla's jokes in "Anne of Green Gables" when I first read it as a ten year old.

  3. #93
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    The humor in children's / young adults' books often is more appreciated by the adults in the reading audience.

    I missed half of Marilla's jokes in "Anne of Green Gables" when I first read it as a ten year old.
    I know - the same can be true of some children's programs. I used to love a program called "Fablernas värld" (the world of fables) as a child - and then I happened across an episode as an adult and thought... "Wow, this is really great - and funny!" (I now own the DVDs.) I think it's especially irony that tends to pass one by...

  4. #94
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Thomas Mann: I read the book in Swedish translation "Bergtagen" - the original German title is "Der Zauberberg" - and it has been translated into English as "The Magic Mountain".

    Hans Castorp, feeling a tad under the weather, is sent to a Swiss mountainside sanatorium to recouperate. The visit was supposed to last three weeks - he ended up staying there... seven years.

  5. #95
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Anthony Trollope: "The Struggles of Brown, Jones and Robinson" - A new-to-me Trollope - one of the few last ones left to me. An ironic tale about how the ill-assorted trio of Brown, Jones and Robinson go into business together - and how it, eventually, all goes to heck in a handbasket. (Scarcely a spoiler, as George Robinson, the youngest member of the firm, tells us as much in the Preface.)

    This is a new age (the 1850s), in which capital is no longer of any consequence - what matters is credit... and advertisement.

    That necessty of having something to sell almost overcame Mr Brown in those days. 'What's the good of puttng down 5,000 Kolinski and Minx boas in the bill if we do not possess one in the shop?' he asked; 'we must have some if they're asked for.' He could not understand that for a first start effect is everything. If customers should want Kolinski Boas, Kolinski Boas would of course be forthcoming - to any number required; either Kolinski boas, or quasi-Kolinski, which in trade is admitted to be the same thing. When a man advertises that he has 40,000 new paletots, he does not mean that he has got that number packed up in a box. If required to do so, he will supply them to that extent - or to any further extent. A long row of figures in trade is but an elegant use of the superlative. If a tradesman can induce a lady to buy a diagonal Osnabruck cashmere shawl by telling her that he has 1,500 of them, who is injured? And if the shawl is not exactly a real diagonal Osnabruck cashmere, what harm is done as long as the lady gets the value for her money? And if she don't get the value for her money, whose fault is that? Isn't it a fair stand-up fight? And when she tries to buy for £4 a shaw that she thinks is worth about £8, isn't she dealing on the same principles hersef? If she be lucky enough to possess credit, the shawl is sent home wthout payment, and three years afterwards fifty percent is perhaps offered for settlement of the bill. It is a fair fight, and the ladies are very well able to take care of themselves.

    A pleasant and amusing read for the already dedicated Trollope aficionado, I'm not sure I'd recommend it as much to someone who is just starting to get acquainted with him. And it probably is not the ideal first Trollope read - seeing how atypical it is to his other work. But, I enjoyed it.

  6. #96
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    David Almond: "The Boy Who Swam with Piranhas"

    Here's a question. How would you like it if someone in your house - your Uncle Ernie, for instance - decided to turn it into a fish-canning factory? How would you like it if there were buckets of pilchards and tubs of mackerel everywhere you looked? What if a shoal of sardines was swimming in the bath? What if your Uncle Ernie kept making more and more machines - machines for chopping the heads off, cutting the tails off, getting the guts out; machines for cleaning them, and boiling them and squashing them into cans? Can you imagine the racket? Can you picture the mess? And just think about the stink!
    What if your Uncle Ernie's machines grew so big that they took over every room - your bedroom, for instance, so that you had to sleep in a cupboard? What if your Uncle Ernie said you couldn't go to school any more but had to stay at home to can the fish? Sounds good? Ah, but what if instead of going to school you had to start work every morning at six o'clock on the dot? And you got no holidays? And you never saw your old pals? Would you like that? Would you heck! Well, neither did Stanley Potts.

  7. #97
    Tripping on the Podium Kitt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    616

    0 Not allowed!
    I just discovered Joyce Maynard. All I knew about her before is that when she was young she was the paramour of J. D. Salinger.

    I read The Good Daughters and really liked it, so I might get her memoir and some of her other novels.

  8. #98
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Charlotte Brontë: "Jane Eyre" (Re-read) - This is one of my Absolute Favourites, and this was probably my fifth or sixth re-read (it would be more, doubtless, were it not for my very strict Reading Rules). This time my re-read was very leisurely, and I took my time through the book, savouring it. I loved doing doing so; but one character did not fare well from it. I was never a St John Rivers fan - but this time he managed to really get up my nose!

  9. #99
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    1 Not allowed!
    Elizabeth von Arnim: "The Enchanted April" - Delightful, joyous, and happy-making.

  10. #100
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Wilkie Collins: "Miss or Mrs?" (re-read) - Victorian "sensation" fiction. This (Oxford University Press) edition includes three novellas: 'Miss or Mrs?', 'The Haunted Hotel' and 'The Guilty River'.

  11. #101
    On the Ice elbkup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    New Hampshire USA
    Posts
    165

    0 Not allowed!
    Canadian writer Robertson Davies has long been one of my favorite authors. Am now rereading "The Cunning Man", about Dr. Jonathan Hullah who combines traditional medicine, spiritual healing with folk remedies in his practice of psychosomatic medicine. The story begins with a mystery: how did Father Hobbes die? But it's not a whodunit in the strict sense... More like a journey or exploration into cause and effect of human nature.
    Other favorites from Davies include "The Rebel Angels", "The Manticore" and "The Lyre of Orpheus" which follows the development of an artist.

    Rebel Angels has a note of apology that is truly memorable and wickedly funny:

    "When I arrived at Hollier's outer room the following morning there was a note for me placed beside a bouquet of flowers - salvia- which had too obviously been culled from the garden outside the rector's lodging. The note read:

    Dearest and Most Understanding of Created Beings:
    Sorry about last night. Some time since I had a really good swig at anything. Shall I say it will never happen again? Not with any degree of sincerity. But I must make reparation! So ask me to dinner again soon and I shall tell you The Story of My Life which is well worth whatever it may cost you.
    Your crawling slave ... P"
    Last edited by elbkup; 11-01-2015 at 07:42 PM.

  12. #102
    Bona Fide Member LRK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    4,600

    0 Not allowed!
    Margaret Oliphant: "Hester" - Victorian "domestic" (that is, realist) fiction. Especially recommended, I'd say, to fans of Anthony Trollope and Elizabeth Gaskell.

    From the (Oxford Univeristy Press) Introduction:

    To turn around Hester is to see the painful story of Catherine Vernon: a 65-year-old unmarried woman, denied love in youth, who finds compensation, most unusually, in the power acquired by her role as the head of the family bank. Around her she gathers a whole family of dependants, both old and young, many of them exploitative, gossipy, and ungratefully resentful. Among the aged is the malicious Mr Mildmay Vernon and the carping spinsters, the Vernon-Ridgeways, as well as the more benign Captain Morgan and his wife. The young include the two young relatives whom Catherine puts in charge of the bank - the dull, conventional Harry and Edward, her trusted favourite - as well as Harry's fashion-loving sister Ellen, and the Morgans' grandchildren Roland and Emma, both of whom are on the lookout to make their way in life.
    Into their midst arrive a sparky 14-year-old Hester, uncomfortably too much like a younger version of Catherine herself, together with her widowed mother Mrs John, the simple, pretty woman whom John Vernon long ago chose in preference to his cousin Catherine. Ironically, it was from John Vernon's disastrous management that Catherine had to rescue the bank. Now, after his death in exile in France, his destitute wife and daughter, ignorant of his culpability, return to England at Catherine's invitation. Supporting all these people who have either hurt her in the past or who challenge and resent her in the present, Catherine half-magnanimously, half-ruefully 'tolerated everything, and smiled at it; she became indulgent and contemptuous. What did it matter what they said or felt?' But it does matter, in one case above all. Together with the rebellious Hester herself, the beloved Edward is, in the increasing power struggle of youth and age, Catherine's weak spot.


    Note: In this case I'd also highly recommend the Introduction, as I think it offers great insight into the novel and also Margaret Oliphant herself.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •