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Thread: Recommend A Book to a GS friend

  1. #91
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    Eleanor H Porter: "Pollyanna" (Re-read) - I really do enjoy reading a feel good book - it makes me feel good, and I enjoy feeling good. Actually, the glad game is harder than one could think - at least I found it so when as a child I was inspired by the book to try it. But then, being quick-tempered and irritable doesn't really help.

    Mrs Snow had lived forty years, and for fifteen of those years she had been too busy wishing things were different to find much time to enjoy things as they were.

    (I miss Olympia. She asked me to tell her what I thought of the book when I'd re-read it. I did reply, and I was pretty right in how I'd feel about it as it turns out - but I'd forgotten how funny it was!)

  2. #92
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    The humor in children's / young adults' books often is more appreciated by the adults in the reading audience.

    I missed half of Marilla's jokes in "Anne of Green Gables" when I first read it as a ten year old.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorispulaski View Post
    The humor in children's / young adults' books often is more appreciated by the adults in the reading audience.

    I missed half of Marilla's jokes in "Anne of Green Gables" when I first read it as a ten year old.
    I know - the same can be true of some children's programs. I used to love a program called "Fablernas värld" (the world of fables) as a child - and then I happened across an episode as an adult and thought... "Wow, this is really great - and funny!" (I now own the DVDs.) I think it's especially irony that tends to pass one by...

  4. #94
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    Thomas Mann: I read the book in Swedish translation "Bergtagen" - the original German title is "Der Zauberberg" - and it has been translated into English as "The Magic Mountain".

    Hans Castorp, feeling a tad under the weather, is sent to a Swiss mountainside sanatorium to recouperate. The visit was supposed to last three weeks - he ended up staying there... seven years.

  5. #95
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    Anthony Trollope: "The Struggles of Brown, Jones and Robinson" - A new-to-me Trollope - one of the few last ones left to me. An ironic tale about how the ill-assorted trio of Brown, Jones and Robinson go into business together - and how it, eventually, all goes to heck in a handbasket. (Scarcely a spoiler, as George Robinson, the youngest member of the firm, tells us as much in the Preface.)

    This is a new age (the 1850s), in which capital is no longer of any consequence - what matters is credit... and advertisement.

    That necessty of having something to sell almost overcame Mr Brown in those days. 'What's the good of puttng down 5,000 Kolinski and Minx boas in the bill if we do not possess one in the shop?' he asked; 'we must have some if they're asked for.' He could not understand that for a first start effect is everything. If customers should want Kolinski Boas, Kolinski Boas would of course be forthcoming - to any number required; either Kolinski boas, or quasi-Kolinski, which in trade is admitted to be the same thing. When a man advertises that he has 40,000 new paletots, he does not mean that he has got that number packed up in a box. If required to do so, he will supply them to that extent - or to any further extent. A long row of figures in trade is but an elegant use of the superlative. If a tradesman can induce a lady to buy a diagonal Osnabruck cashmere shawl by telling her that he has 1,500 of them, who is injured? And if the shawl is not exactly a real diagonal Osnabruck cashmere, what harm is done as long as the lady gets the value for her money? And if she don't get the value for her money, whose fault is that? Isn't it a fair stand-up fight? And when she tries to buy for £4 a shaw that she thinks is worth about £8, isn't she dealing on the same principles hersef? If she be lucky enough to possess credit, the shawl is sent home wthout payment, and three years afterwards fifty percent is perhaps offered for settlement of the bill. It is a fair fight, and the ladies are very well able to take care of themselves.

    A pleasant and amusing read for the already dedicated Trollope aficionado, I'm not sure I'd recommend it as much to someone who is just starting to get acquainted with him. And it probably is not the ideal first Trollope read - seeing how atypical it is to his other work. But, I enjoyed it.

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