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Thread: Recommend A Book to a GS friend

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LRK View Post
    I've read "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" - the first book; I've got the second sitting in my library-pile at the moment, so am looking forward to reading that. I suppose maybe everyone knows, but I think it's worth mentioning that it is quite humorous.
    It is not really my kind of reading but I have to read the whole series this year, since my daughter got them for her 8th grade reading. She supposed to read only the first book but love it so much so she continued to finished the whole 800+ pages.

    Another book from her reading list I quite enjoy is "The Wrinkle In Time" By Madeleine L'Engle.

    For anyone who enjoy children's books, try "Totto-Chan: The Little Girl at the Window" By Tetsuko Kuroyanagi. I've been reading this book for more than 30 years and always end up in tears every single time.

  2. #17
    Ice is slippery Meoima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BusyMom View Post
    For anyone who enjoy children's books, try "Totto-Chan: The Little Girl at the Window" By Tetsuko Kuroyanagi. I've been reading this book for more than 30 years and always end up in tears every single time.
    I know this book, I read it when I was 12 years old. I wish my schooling were like that. I mean I used to hate school very much.

    Another good read: Promise at Dawn by Romain Gary

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    A Wrinkle in Time is one of my favorite books ever. What an inventive tale! It connects with so many emotions in me whenever I reread it.

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    Size 7 Knife Boots Sam-Skwantch's Avatar
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    I'm so glad this thread is getting attention. I had a feeling there would be some serious readers among us. I'm finishing up a Hemingway right now but will be looking for something new in the next few weeks. I've been on a classics kick lately.

    I really was drawn to books from my sociology classes like Ishmael and Celestine prophecies but am looking to branch out a bit. Love the suggestions.


  5. #20
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    If you're into classics at the moment, then I could go on and on!!! I absolutely love to read whenever the opportunity presents itself. And I enjoy reading a wide range of stories - but fiction is admittedly my favorite. In high school, I read a lot of the classics for fun. Now that I'm busy with higher education, I don't have the right amount of time to read like I used to ... sadly.

    However, some favorites include: Jane Austen (all - some I prefer over others of course), John Steinbeck ("The Pearl" & "Of Mice and Men" were good imo as short stories go), The Count of Monte Cristo, certain Shakespeare, The Scarlett Letter (I appreciated it most the second time around), The Great Gatsby, Gone With the Wind, Tolstoy, etc.

    If you have an open-mind and don't mind reading non-standard English dialects, then I also suggest "The Adventures of Huckelberry Finn" and "Tom Sawyer." They're fun books if you can get past the language and slurs of the time period.

    For modern novels, I of course like "Harry Potter" and Agatha Christie...
    Chick-Lit - Shopaholic series ...I feel like you have to get a few chapters in the first novel to appreciate the humor (if it's your humor of course...I sympathize with her shopping habit) O=)

    I know I'm forgetting some major favorites, but this topic is too hard for me, haha. I LOVE reading....and it's so hard to pick favorites.

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    I love Jane Austen. She was so ahead of her time considering her works has been around for more than 200 years. My favourite is "Emma" though not "Pride and Prejudice". Austen's heroines are so sassy and outspoken even for this modern era where in some parts of the world women still be banned from the rights of education.

    I would like to recommend "The Romance of the Three Kingdoms" by Luo Guanzhong. Might be a bit of a challenge for non-Asian readers since the book involving almost a thousand characters with Chinese names. I even needed to draw a diagram when I was a kid to help me keep up with the story.

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    In nonfiction, I really like Nathaniel Philbrick's books, especially Mayflower, and In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex. I just bought Bunker Hill today.

    The wreck of the Essex is the historical basis of Moby Dick.

  8. #23
    Ice is slippery Meoima's Avatar
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    You could try Watership Down by Richard Adams, excellent writing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meoima View Post
    You could try Watership Down by Richard Adams, excellent writing!
    I remember loving Adams. I couldn't really get through his second book, Shardik, but Watership Down was lovely.

  10. #25
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Amazon lists a large number of resellers who have a copy of the The Blue Hawk, in your choice of paperback or hardbound.

    I will have to get a copy.

  11. #26
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    Thanks, Doris - I will have to look into that.

    Someone upthread mentioned Jane Austen, I think? Love her - of course. A note to anyone who may find the notion of reading a 19th century classic "intimidating" - whether or not it ultimately turns out to be your favourite Jane Austen or not, "Pride and Prejudice" is veeery easy to get into. (My favourites are "Pride and Prejudice" and "Persuasion".)

    To the Jane Austen fan, other classics that may be worth looking into (depending on what it is that appeals to you about her writing):

    Fanny Burney: "Evelina"
    Maria Edgeworth: "Belinda"
    Susan Ferrier: "Marriage"
    Elizabeth Gaskell: "North and South"/"Cranford"
    Margaret Oliphant: "Miss Marjoribanks"

    For the more fun/ny, frothy, fluffy side - but nonetheless very well-written historical novels with, I think, great period feel - there is always... Georgette Heyer. I already know there are fellow Georgette Heyer fans on GS (Hi! - waves). I'm almost convinced that one of the reasons why the Internet had to be invented was to let Georgette Heyer fans know: "You Are Not Alone!" And turn reading her from a guilty pleasure into simply a pleasure - as it ought to be. My personal favourite is "Devil's Cub" - What's Yours?

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    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Waves back

    Sci fi conventions used to have Heyer meetups!

    I think the connection was really good sci fi and Heyer's Regency works all involve fully realized alternate worlds, so complete that you are sure you inhabited them in another life, or perhaps in dreams.

  13. #28
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    I remember loving Adams. I couldn't really get through his second book, Shardik, but Watership Down was lovely.
    I haven't read "Watership Down" - yet - but it is certainly something I want to get to. Did you know that, apparently, there is a sequel? "Tales from Watership Down".

    I've actually read "Traveller" by him, the US Civil War as seen through the eyes of General Lee's horse - that may be more your cup of tea if "Shardik" (which I haven't read) didn't work for you. I really loved a children's book by him, though, "The Bureaucats", which I thought was a great deal of fun. (Note: I'm a cat fanatic, though, so anything with cats in it, and I'm predisposed towards it. )

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by LRK View Post

    For the more fun/ny, frothy, fluffy side - but nonetheless very well-written historical novels with, I think, great period feel - there is always... Georgette Heyer. I already know there are fellow Georgette Heyer fans on GS (Hi! - waves). I'm almost convinced that one of the reasons why the Internet had to be invented was to let Georgette Heyer fans know: "You Are Not Alone!" And turn reading her from a guilty pleasure into simply a pleasure - as it ought to be. My personal favourite is "Devil's Cub" - What's Yours?
    *Waves back to you and Doris*

    Devil's Cub is wonderful indeed. If we're talking strictly Austen-inspired Regency romance, my favorite is probably The Grand Sophy. But really I have to allow for two different sets of faves, because Devil's Cub wasn't a Regency at all. Heyer wrote a bunch of delightful stories set in the eighteenth century, inspired not by Austen but possibly by a now-obscure later author named Jeffery Farnol. Devil's Cub and its prequel, These Old Shades, set a generation earlier even than that, are part of the only series (for want of a better word) that I think Heyer ever wrote. The Regency components of the series are Regency Buck (a classic Regency romance, with the most important plot line being the romance between the two main characters). An Infamous Army is set in the Regency era and features characters from Regency Buck but deals with the far weightier matter of the Battle of Waterloo. Heyer turns out to have been a splendid chronicler of battle scenes, giving a fabulously clear and dynamic picture of troop movements on the battlefield. I highly recommend each book in this varied sequence.

    But for true Regency delight, light and frothy but with substance underneath, I'd say that The Grand Sophy is just about Heyer's best of the breed.

  15. #30
    Ice is slippery Meoima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam-Skwantch View Post
    I'm so glad this thread is getting attention. I had a feeling there would be some serious readers among us. I'm finishing up a Hemingway right now but will be looking for something new in the next few weeks. I've been on a classics kick lately.
    Sam, if you are in the mood for classical, I recommend you Embers by Sándor Márai: http://www.amazon.com/Embers-S%C3%A1.../dp/0375707425
    I love this book very much. The writing is sublime. Here is the summary, but you know, it's impossible to summarise this masterpiece:

    In a secluded woodland castle an old General prepares to receive a rare visitor, a man who was once his closest friend but who he has not seen in forty-one years. Over the ensuing hours host and guest will fight a duel of words and silences, accusations and evasions. They will exhume the memory of their friendship and that of the General’s beautiful, long-dead wife. And they will return to the time the three of them last sat together following a hunt in the nearby forest--a hunt in which no game was taken but during which something was lost forever. Embers is a classic of modern European literature, a work whose poignant evocation of the past also seems like a prophetic glimpse into the moral abyss of the present
    Another one: Narcissus and Goldmund by Hermann Hesse

    First published in 1930, Narcissus and Goldmund is the story of two diametrically opposite men: one, an ascetic monk firm in his religious commitment, and the other, a romantic youth hungry for worldly experience.Hesse was a great writer in precisely the modern sense: complex, subtle, allusive: alive to the importance of play. Narcissus and Goldmund is his very best. What makes this short book so limitlessly vast is the body-and-soul-shaking debate that runs through it, which it has the honesty and courage not to resolve: between the flesh and spirit, art and scientific or religious speculation, action and contemplation.

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