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Thread: Best figure skates? Toe pick questions?

  1. #1
    Rinkside
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    Best figure skates? Toe pick questions?

    Hello all,

    As I am getting a new pair of skates, I want to make sure I get the best ones. What are the best? I need something with good ankle support (of course), and something good for those with slightly wide feet. What are the best options?

    Also, what is the difference between the "curved" toe pick and the classic one? I've been dying to know. Is it just appearance wise or does it help with tricks and agility?

  2. #2
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    You've kind of left out every single one of the important details...

    Like: level? Height? Weight? Highest jump? Current boot? Rate of progress? What you're working on?

  3. #3
    Rinkside
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    Sorry about that, I'm still a bit of a beginner skater. I don't have exact measurements but right now my 6 1/2 boot is too large, I am thinking of a 6 or even a 5 1/2. I'm still in basic 8 and working on crossovers mainly.

    I was asking more about a brand of boot rather than all measurement wise. I don't jump really out of a two-foot hop in place (but I'm working on waltz jumps, bunny hops, etc.).

  4. #4
    Off the ice Buttercup's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSnowQueen2013 View Post
    Sorry about that, I'm still a bit of a beginner skater. I don't have exact measurements but right now my 6 1/2 boot is too large, I am thinking of a 6 or even a 5 1/2. I'm still in basic 8 and working on crossovers mainly.

    I was asking more about a brand of boot rather than all measurement wise. I don't jump really out of a two-foot hop in place (but I'm working on waltz jumps, bunny hops, etc.).
    Unless you're getting custom-made boots, which at beginner level really isn't necessary unless you have orthopedic issues that require it, there is no single best brand - it depends on the shape of your feet and what you're comfortable with.

    If you have wide feet, you should probably stay away from Risport boots, which tend to be on the narrow side. Jacksons or Edeas might be a good fit for you. Another question is how stiff a boot you want; as karne pointed out, that depends on your height/weight as well as what kind of stuff you're working on and the level you want to get to. I would guess moderate stiffness would be enough for what you're aiming at. A stiffer boot will provide better support, which you will need, but it will likely take longer to break in. I've heard Edea skates are synthetic and can be broken in pretty quickly, but I don't think they can be heat-molded.

    And of course, there's the matter of cost. How much are you willing to spend?

    The bottom line is that it would really be best if you could find a decent pro shop and try on some skates. Barring that, you can read up on different skates (Edea not included in that link) and how to measure your feet and try to come up with the best choice based on that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Unless you're getting custom-made boots, which at beginner level really isn't necessary unless you have orthopedic issues that require it, there is no single best brand - it depends on the shape of your feet and what you're comfortable with.

    If you have wide feet, you should probably stay away from Risport boots, which tend to be on the narrow side. Jacksons or Edeas might be a good fit for you. Another question is how stiff a boot you want; as karne pointed out, that depends on your height/weight as well as what kind of stuff you're working on and the level you want to get to. I would guess moderate stiffness would be enough for what you're aiming at. A stiffer boot will provide better support, which you will need, but it will likely take longer to break in. I've heard Edea skates are synthetic and can be broken in pretty quickly, but I don't think they can be heat-molded.

    And of course, there's the matter of cost. How much are you willing to spend?

    The bottom line is that it would really be best if you could find a decent pro shop and try on some skates. Barring that, you can read up on different skates (Edea not included in that link) and how to measure your feet and try to come up with the best choice based on that.

  6. #6
    Rinkside
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    That link really helped! Thank you. So what about the toe picks?

  7. #7
    Custom Title Kitt's Avatar
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    I have a wider foot and love my Riedells. I don't jump, so I have the lower toe pick filed down so I don't trip over it while ice dancing. If you're jumping, that's a different story.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Unless you're getting custom-made boots, which at beginner level really isn't necessary unless you have orthopedic issues that require it, there is no single best brand - it depends on the shape of your feet and what you're comfortable with.

    If you have wide feet, you should probably stay away from Risport boots, which tend to be on the narrow side. Jacksons or Edeas might be a good fit for you. Another question is how stiff a boot you want; as karne pointed out, that depends on your height/weight as well as what kind of stuff you're working on and the level you want to get to. I would guess moderate stiffness would be enough for what you're aiming at. A stiffer boot will provide better support, which you will need, but it will likely take longer to break in. I've heard Edea skates are synthetic and can be broken in pretty quickly, but I don't think they can be heat-molded.

    And of course, there's the matter of cost. How much are you willing to spend?

    The bottom line is that it would really be best if you could find a decent pro shop and try on some skates. Barring that, you can read up on different skates (Edea not included in that link) and how to measure your feet and try to come up with the best choice based on that.
    The OP simply needs to talk to their coach and fitter about equipment. The Fitter will do the measurements and ask you the relevant questions are they know which boots should work well for you.

    Anyone whose feet are done growing should seriously consider custom boots.

  9. #9
    Rinkside
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    So much has to do with your weight, foot arch, height and level of skating. You should go to a good skate shop and fitter and try on different brands. Graf Richmond special might be ok for you. Once you know your preferred skate, that needs to fit you snug not loose, you can order online. And then comes the blade question. You are basically a beginner so might not want to spend the $ for customs. And it depends what country you live in too... Harlick do good custom boots.

  10. #10
    Off the ice Buttercup's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Components View Post
    The OP simply needs to talk to their coach and fitter about equipment. The Fitter will do the measurements and ask you the relevant questions are they know which boots should work well for you.

    Anyone whose feet are done growing should seriously consider custom boots.
    That's all nice and well, but not everyone has access to a fitter, and coaches don't always steer skaters in the direction that is best for them individually. I imagine the OP would not have come here for advice if she had better options at the rink or nearby.

    Custom boots are expensive, and especially for a beginner skater, the expense can be hard to justify. I have friends who are at a much higher level than I am, including some who skate competitively at the adult level, and many people do just fine with the regular product lines. I would suggest the OP start there and see if she can find something that works for her before spending three times as much on a custom boot that might not be needed.

  11. #11
    Rinkside
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    Yeah, sadly my nearest dealer is 3 hours away and I am a minor so I cannot drive myself. I tried to get measurements for my foot, and the ball circumference is 8 inches on the right foot and a little more than 7 1/2 inches on the left. Both feet are 8 inches long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSnowQueen2013 View Post
    Yeah, sadly my nearest dealer is 3 hours away and I am a minor so I cannot drive myself. I tried to get measurements for my foot, and the ball circumference is 8 inches on the right foot and a little more than 7 1/2 inches on the left. Both feet are 8 inches long.
    Most boot manufacturers will send you a sizing kit if you contact them and explain your situation. Sizing is not universal - you might be, for example, a 6 in Riedell but a 7 in Jackson (I don't really know, just giving examples). It would be far more accurate to get your hands on some of these than play guesswork.

  13. #13
    Rinkside
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    Are you in USA? Last time I bought competitive blades and boots for freestyle was 3 years ago, and it was about $1300. You need to talk to a good skate shop because at Basic 8 you don't need that. I seem to think most beginning freestyle skaters used a Reidell silver star with blade pre attached. If you buy boot and blade separately they have to be mounted by a fitter who knows what they are doing. Usually they look at your weight and how you walk, and do a temporary mount, so that when you get on the ice you glide in a straight line. After a week or so they will permanently affix the blade. Those boots need waterproofed. Cover them with SK8 tape across the front at least to stop your blade cutting the leather when you are starting to jump. It just pulls off and leaves the boot looking like new for competition. A bad sharpening by inexperienced person at the rink can wreck your blade in one go. Be wary of used boots as they are usually broken down. Pay for waterproofing when you get blade attached! Boots last longer and they don't repair when water gets up in the sole and heel. Try as many different ones on as you can. The one that is best for you might be the worst for your friend. There are a couple of good online skate shops you can buy from. Trying them on in the local shop does not obligate you to buy. You need a beginning freestyle boot and blade to go through single jumps at basic 8. Not the custom package.

  14. #14
    Rinkside
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    Thank you. What do you know about the toe picks? What is the difference between the classic and the curved?

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    🌸🐱❄🐱❄🐱🌸 jennyanydots's Avatar
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    That's kind of a weird way to classify toepicks so I'm not quite sure what you mean. Beginner toe picks will of course be small. What blade is best is dependent on what your skating goals are. If you plan on sticking with it and progressing to jumps and spins, it's probably worth it to invest in intermediate blades like the MK Professional, Wilson Coronation Ace or Ultima Legacy. However if you don't plan on skating much or if you're feet are still growing, an entry level blade will do just fine. There are two types of toepicks, cross-cut (e.g. MK Professional) and straight (e.g. MK Vision). Which is better depends on personal preference, but the cross-cut picks supposedly grip the ice better. I personally like cross-cut better but some people find them too sticky. There are also two basic profiles, which is a very rough generalization. The MK Professional, MK Gold Star and Wilson Gold Seal have toepicks with small teeth that are angle downward, so I don't know if that is what you mean by curved. The MK Vision, MK Phantom and Wilson Pattern 99 have larger teeth that are angled more outwards. The latter are more of a trip hazard but are supposedly good for jumps. However, toepicks are only part of the story. How the blade is curved (the rocker) and the angle of the lowest (base) pick really have the most effect on your skating.

    Back to boots, it depends on your weight and level. If you're full adult-sized or rather heavy, you can get away with some overbooting for level. But if you're still growing or light, a beginner boot should be adequate. Jackson and Graf are generally recommended for wider feet. Stay away from Risport, very narrow. Customs are probably not worth it unless you have unusual feet. Stock boots are much easier to deal with. However, you may have a bit of a problem since the circumferences of both feet that you measured aren't the same, granted that you measured them correctly.

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