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Thread: Bookstore on My Mind.

  1. #31
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    I use a magnifying glass, and am so used to doing so, that I don't like large print books - I'm so used to focusing on that little circle that I don't like not having to use it; I end up reading a bit with, and a bit without, and being annoyed however I do.

    Note: I'm a die-hard traditionalist and read print books ONLY.

    Note2: I've got around 10% of normal eyesight - with glasses - on my right good eye; the left one is worse. Just in case anyone is curious.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by LRK View Post
    I use a magnifying glass, and am so used to doing so, that I don't like large print books - I'm so used to focusing on that little circle that I don't like not having to use it; I end up reading a bit with, and a bit without, and being annoyed however I do.

    Note: I'm a die-hard traditionalist and read print books ONLY.

    Note2: I've got around 10% of normal eyesight - with glasses - on my right good eye; the left one is worse. Just in case anyone is curious.
    LRK, you are a truly determined bookworm! I'm glad you've found a way to surmount your challenge.

  3. #33
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    LRK, you are a truly determined bookworm! I'm glad you've found a way to surmount your challenge.
    Thank you, Olympia. One of the most cherished compliments of my life was when an optician (who worked with visually disabled people like me) told me he'd never seen anyone with my level of eyesight read so quickly - I was so pleased! Everyone is good at something - even me. And goodness knows this is somthing I should be good at, the amount of time I've spent on it - and, as they say, practice makes perfect.

  4. #34
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    LRK, the other thing you get to enjoy with real books is their feel, the texture of the pages and the covers, as well as the aroma of fresh ink versus the mustiness of old books. None of these can be reproduced on a Kindle, though they have other advantages! One company here that used to publish a paperback line of fantasy literature had a particular scent of ink, which I would always want to smell as I opened the book for the first time.

  5. #35
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    Real books can last for centuries.

    Unfortunately, computer documents, including virtual books, are unlikely to last more than 10 or 20 years. The hardware improves. That drives software to become less and less backward compatible. My Office 2003 documents already yield warnings from Office 2010 that editing them might damage my computer.

  6. #36
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    It's all so very... transient, isn't it? I'm thinking of all those old letter collections - and we with our emails... (I actually do print out some of my correspondence - not that I know who will care, but for myself if nothing else.) I just wonder what will remain of us, and of our conversations, and the fun we have had here on GS for instance, when we're gone? Will it all just... disappear?

  7. #37
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
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    It's a sobering thought. I have family letters and documents that go back to the early 1800's. In my mother's family, there are two diaries that cover the lives of an average farm family in the 1600's from this part of Connecticut. These diaries are in the state archives now, but they have been published in hard copy, and are on the internet as well.

    Our lives in this century leave almost as few permanent traces as if we were illiterate hunter-gatherers; indeed less, since most of us produce nothing for ourselves. We make no spear points or hand axes or cave paintings. The artifacts of our lives here in the US are now made in Asia. Most of us will not even leave our bones, if we choose to be cremated.

    Meanwhile, nearly everything that documents my existence is virtual-emails, digital photos, and so forth. I have started to send occasional real letters to my grandkids, because I would like them to have some personal communications from me that they could save, if that were something they wanted to do. Good times to write a real letter are when we are travelling or when the grandkids are at summer camp.

    "All we are is dust in the wind," or 0's and 1's in cyberspace.
    Last edited by dorispulaski; 05-31-2014 at 10:52 AM.

  8. #38
    Custom Title LRK's Avatar
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    Sadly, I must very much agree with you, Doris...

  9. #39
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    That's true, Doris. Funny that we hear that all our plastic trash will never break down, whereas the handprints of our lives might all but vanish.

    I have a copy of my grandfather's citizenship papers from early in the last century, and holding it is like standing in a time machine. His wife and all the children born up to that time, including Mom, are listed. Nothing replaces the feel of a real artifact, though of course online resources make many documents more widely accessible.

  10. #40
    Size 7 Knife Boots Sam-Skwantch's Avatar
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    When I first starting reading outside of just school assignments I would immediately give anything I finished to someone I thought would enjoy it. The notion was one of spreading the joy of reading and finding someone to swap interpretations with. Now I'm just refusing to even lend books out if I'm at all skeptical of ever getting it back I've become obsessed with growing my collection. The irony is I'm guilty of keeping others books they lent me so I guess it takes one to know one

    I've already purchased another copy of Watership Down to give away once I'm done. I still want to share the books but not at the expense of my library

  11. #41
    Landing 3As in my dreams! skatedreamer's Avatar
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    If you love mysteries, this store is definitely worth a visit in NYC. Sadly, it's the last of its kind here. There used to be one in my neighborhood called "Murder Ink" that I loved, not just for the books but also for its 2 kitties-in-residence, one of whom was a huge handsome longhair named Clouseau!

    http://www.mysteriousbookshop.com/

  12. #42
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    A mystery bookstore! How lovely. I feel a special obligation toward independent bookstores. Nowadays I even feel obligated to buy at Barnes & Noble, because even they are endangered by Amazon and other online enterprises. Look what happened to Borders.

  13. #43
    Size 7 Knife Boots Sam-Skwantch's Avatar
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    not just for the books but also for its 2 kitties-in-residence
    I love the sleeping kitties at Bleeker Street Records. Every time I'm in New York I intend to visit two places, the Village Vanguard and those kitties at BSR. The one below is always sleeping it seems :toocute:

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MUeoTbN0E0...0/P1100488.jpg

    I agree with Olympia in regards to Barnes and Noble almost being as volatile as a mom and pops store. I only buy books in bookstores and I always will although I see the benefits of online shopping. Doesn't mean I have to like it.

  14. #44
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    I have bought only a few things online. One was a DVD I couldn't get anywhere--a lovely little TV production called Who Am I This Time, a from a short story about a small town theater group with a very young Christopher Walken and Susan Sarandon, and one was an obscure Ellis Peters mystery from her earliest writing years, with a modern setting (not a Brother Cadfael). I might someday also order the movie Agatha, which I have on videocassette only. It's a splendid little story based on a real-life incident in Agatha Christie's life, where she disappeared for about a week and then turned up with no explanation. Vanessa Redgrave is splendid as Agatha, and Dustin Hoffman and Timothy Dalton costar.

    But everything else seems to come to me in time in real bookstores, if I'm patient and just keep looking.

  15. #45
    Landing 3As in my dreams! skatedreamer's Avatar
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    My big adventure today was a visit to Bleecker Street Records -- thanks for the tip, S-S! Music stores (CDs/vinyl/sheet music) are also dying in NYC, just like bookstores, so it was wonderful to be able to walk in and browse. I came home with 2 treasures: a Bill Evans CD called Piano Player and a collection of some of Odetta's greatest hits, including my personal favorite, All the Pretty Little Horses. Listening to Bill right now w/ Odetta cued up and ready to go.

    Also got to meet your kitty friend, who was dozing per usual. She gave my hand a casual lick but also allowed me to rub her tummy.

    I'm sure this was just the first of many visits. Thanks again!

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