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Thread: Hyperspecialization Is Ruining Youth Sports—And The Kids Who Play Them --

  1. #16
    Celebrating the Excellence of #VirtueMoir golden411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mskater93 View Post
    ... younger sibs who are forced to endure countless hours in the rink.
    Quote Originally Posted by skatedreamer View Post
    Do you mean that sibs get stuck @ the rink while bro/sis practices so that the sibs can't do their own stuff? If so, sounds like countless hours of therapy in the making.
    OTOH, another phenomenon is that some elite skaters started taking their very first lessons because they were hanging around the rink anyway as an older sibling trained. And then it turned out that only the younger sib really stuck with the sport and continued on to a notable career.

    Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but IIRC, Jason Brown and his older sister are examples of this scenario. (And I'm sure that I have read/heard of several other examples, although off the top of my head, I don't remember exactly who.)
    I think that Jason also is one of the elite skaters who has said that they were drawn to the ice because they looked up to an older sib and wanted to emulate her/him.

    As always, thx for starting the thread, Mrs. P.

  2. #17
    Landing 3As in my dreams! skatedreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by golden411 View Post
    OTOH, another phenomenon is that some elite skaters started taking their very first lessons because they were hanging around the rink anyway as an older sibling trained. And then it turned out that only the younger sib really stuck with the sport and continued on to a notable career.

    Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but IIRC, Jason Brown and his older sister are examples of this scenario. (And I'm sure that I have read/heard of several other examples, although off the top of my head, I don't remember exactly who.)
    I think that Jason also is one of the elite skaters who has said that they were drawn to the ice because they looked up to an older sib and wanted to emulate her/him.

    As always, thx for starting the thread, Mrs. P.
    But of course! If baby bro or sis ends up loving skating, so much the better! My comment was really about the kids who would rather be playing baseball or chess (trying to think of extremes here ) or doing whatever else. The point being that it's not fair to support one kid's passion at the expense of the other's.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by concorde View Post
    Going to back the injury question - lot of parents (rich or poor) do not listen to the child when the child says a part of the body hurts. So the minor injury continues and builds until a long-term issue.
    Or the coaches.

    If little Jason had said, "Kori, my knees hurt" you can bet Kori would have had him scaled back in a heartbeat.

    If little Joshua had said, "Tom, my knees hurt"...well...we know how that ended.

    Joshua's 2011 ISU bio said he was doing 40 hours a week on the ice. He was sixteen.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatedreamer View Post
    But of course! If baby bro or sis ends up loving skating, so much the better! My comment was really about the kids who would rather be playing baseball or chess (trying to think of extremes here ) or doing whatever else. The point being that it's not fair to support one kid's passion at the expense of the other's.
    And I think that is an important point. Especially if one kid becomes the family "star," that can be difficult for a sibling who also needs attention or even, perhaps, funds for a particular pursuit.

  5. #20
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    karne - I put a lot of the blame on the parents for not listening to their own child. Parents and most coaches have two very different goals. A parent wants the child to be the best person they can be; however, most coaches focus only on the child's skating without regard to development in other areas. As a result, the coach can push a child to injury; a parent should be looking at ways to prevent an injury and once it happens, how to fix it.

    As the parent of one former Olympian skater told me - as a parent, you have to live with the long-term consequence of any injury. The coaches do not. A smart parent questions what a coach says if it does not make sense.

  6. #21
    Celebrating the Excellence of #VirtueMoir golden411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatedreamer View Post
    But of course! If baby bro or sis ends up loving skating, so much the better! My comment was really about the kids who would rather be playing baseball or chess (trying to think of extremes here ) or doing whatever else. The point being that it's not fair to support one kid's passion at the expense of the other's.
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
    And I think that is an important point. Especially if one kid becomes the family "star," that can be difficult for a sibling who also needs attention or even, perhaps, funds for a particular pursuit.
    Could not agree more with the point that the endeavors of all siblings deserve equal support.
    [ I did not mention it in my post above not because it is unimportant, but because I thought it was a matter of "it goes without saying." ]

  7. #22
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    food for thought you keep saying rich parents dont think of cross training but maybe its a time issue too. Our one son plays hockey he is 11 and is very gifted at it, he started late by hockey standards he was 9, but has flown up the ranks and from September to April is on the ice a minimum of 5 times a week. You ask what he is doing when not playing ice hockey? He goes to public skating, plays street hockey or rollerblades all his choice. His sister is in competitve gymnastics and trains 12 hours a week she is 9, and when she isnt at the gym she is doing flips on the grass. Both of these 2 have no interest in joining another team and honestly I dont have time for another team where would I fit it in? and as for the money we struggle to keep them in their sports of choice, I couldnt afford another one. 10 thousand at least a year go out of my wallet every year, if I had money I might push harder for another sport for 2 months in their off season than I do but then again maybe not, kids still need time to just be kids. My only form of cross training is insisting they take 2 months off in the summer.

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